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older, wiser?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by JC, Jun 26, 1999.

  1. JC

    JC Junior Member
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    I need advice. I was taking pre-med courses in college but left school because of lack of concentration and thirst for travel. That was 5 years ago. I've since lived in Atlanta and Boston and have returned to my home town of Buffalo. I played in a band, toured the country twice and learned a lot in those years. My desire to be a D.O. is now stronger than ever. My previous grades were semi-poor but I know I can improve since I am older and more focused. Any advice for returning to action?
     
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  3. DO DUDE

    DO DUDE Senior Member
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    Get high grades in whatever prerequisites you have left. Start volunteering in a healthcare environment and seek out a DO to shadow. Start studying and practicing for the MCAT ASAP. Basically you'll need to put as much distance between your past and what you are now capable of as possible. You'll eventually need recommendation letters so make contact with some of those long-lost professors through e-mail or any other method soon.
     
  4. JC

    JC Junior Member
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    I work in a radiology dept at a med center in Buffalo. I work with a DO radiologist. He is young and would be glad to help me. I don't see him that much but I am confident. Thanks for your advice.
     
  5. DO DUDE

    DO DUDE Senior Member
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    Good that you've already been working with a DO. The letter that a DO writes for you can be one of the most important factors. It's often used to determine whether you are truly motivated to become an OSTEOPATHIC physician. I was out of school for almost 9 years before I applied. IMO life experience will help your case as long as you put max. effort into it now in any post-bac. work.
     
  6. Synergy

    Synergy Member
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    During one of my interviews (St. Louis University), I met a guy who's story sounded a lot like yours. He was MS2. He dropped out of college, was a beach bum for a while, played in a band, then returned and got serious about becoming a doctor. He may be an anomoly, but it does happen now and then.
     
  7. OldManDave

    OldManDave Fossil Bouncer Emeritus
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    JC,

    Let me tell you...it is do-able! I'm 32 and just recently completed my first BS. I will be starting KCOM this fall. All of the advice given above is very positive...afterall, I virtually flunked-out of Ugrad school when I was 20. But, I busted my *** to come back.

    Now, I know I will be able to pursue my life's dream to be a physician...it's all about making the necessary sacrifices and being committed and working hard enough to get there.

    Hell, if I can do it, so can you!

    ------------------
    'Old Man Dave'
    KCOM, Class of '03
     
  8. azeri

    azeri Junior Member

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    DO Dude has great advice, let me add my two cents worth. I too, am a sort of comeback kid. I was out of school for 5 yrs before I went back and finished my BS. I, like Old Man Dave, did not do well during my first attempt at college. I think that after 5 yrs, you are not really the same person and admissions committees are aware of this, so unless you were in jail I wouldn't worry about your past. If anything, it will work to your advantage.
    What you must do now is get AWESOME grades, there is no room for srewing up. Get strong MCAT's, talk to everyone you can think of about your interest in medicine and volunteer in a place where you can really get some meaningful experience. I personally think that mentoring youth, teaching people to read, working on a hot-line, anything like that is better than volunteering in a hospital where you just get to watch patients and get in everyone's way. Wherever you go make an impression on people, so when you ask them for a letter, they have something of value to say! Good luck!
     
  9. JC

    JC Junior Member
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    Thank you all for your advice. Much appreciated. As far as MCAT's are concerned, does the Kaplan course help significantly? When I was in Boston, there were ads all over the subways, the radio, etc.
     
  10. DO DUDE

    DO DUDE Senior Member
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    "To take Kaplan or not to take Kaplan..That is the question!"

    Seriously though there are a bunch of threads on this board where that issue is discussed extensively. You can basically boil it down to this: If you've been out of school for awhile it can help you to review in a structured manner and give you tutors/peers to help you with questions. You can also use their practice tests. Some people that are still in school say they did just as well or better in the end studying on their own. My philosophy was since I had been out of school for quite awhile I would rather take Kaplan and wish I hadn't than to not take Kaplan and wish I had after bombing the MCAT.
     
  11. mightymouse

    mightymouse Member
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    Yhe only problem I have with what DO DUDE has to say to your question is his advice to separate yourself from your past/ I understand what he is trying to say here but i think it would be better for you to embrace your past and use it to your advantage. Rather than totally ignoring it and turning over a new leaf, I would imagine med schools looking more favorably on someone who recognized their mistakes, used them to an advantage and overcame themselves. Keep that in mind, this is the stuff personal statements and interviews are made of.
     
  12. JC

    JC Junior Member
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    I don't view my past experiences as mistakes. I learned more moving around and traveling than I did in my first shot at undergrad. I've been supporting myself since I was 17. I hope admissions commitees take into consideration what traveling and living on one's own can do for someone. My time off has done me good. Now I'm ready to get things done.


    [This message has been edited by JC (edited July 12, 1999).]

    [This message has been edited by JC (edited July 12, 1999).]
     
  13. mightymouse

    mightymouse Member
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    Im sure that the committees will take all of those factors into consideration. Play to your strengths and stick to your guns. If you believe in yourself, there's no reason for the schools not to do the same.
     

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