Dismiss Notice
SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

oncology fellowship

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by titan, Dec 27, 2001.

  1. titan

    titan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2001
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have preliminary interests in going into medical oncology. As I understand it you must first do your residency in IM and then do a fellowship in oncology. Am I right in my assumption? If so, is this type of fellowship competitive? Anyone who is experienced in the residency/fellowship requirements of oncologists (preferably all types) and the competiveness of each please tell me what you know. Thanks!
     
  2. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Voxel

    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2001
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    2
    The road to medical oncology is usually through a 3 year internal medicine residency followed by a 3 year hematology/oncology fellowship. That means 6 years of residency training after 4 years of medical school.

    It is competitive but not as competitive as cardiology and GI. Competitiveness is also a function of what internal medicine program you were able to match into, how you did there, your letters of recommendation, who you know, and any research you have done while in an internal medicine residency. There are other factors such as location and reputation. Some of the less known in the heme/onc circles, geographically less desirable programs will be less competitive. (obviously).

    The last thing you should know is that it is not as popular because you constantly deal with dying patients.

    Heme/Onc may seem glorious as a med/pre-med student, but be prepared to deal with terminally ill patients on a daily basis. Try it, before you buy it.
     
  4. Academic Radiation Oncologist

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2001
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    2
    Best programs:

    Memorial Sloan Kettering, NY
    MD Anderson, Texas
    Dana-Farber, Harvard
    Duke, NC
    Yale, CT
    U of Minnesota, MN
    UCSF, CA
    John Hopkins, MD
    NCI, MD
    U of Wisconsin, WI
    U of Washington, WA
    Mayo Clinic, MN
    Stanford, CA
    Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON :p
     
  5. Gregory Gulick

    Gregory Gulick Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 1998
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    2
    I too have an interest in hematology/oncology, and from my research I have found that it is hardly competitive at all. I based this on the fact that, according to the AMA, over 50% of the current fellows in training are from medical schools outside the United States. While this is by no means a direct indicator of how competitive a program is, it may very well be suggestive of the competition. If, for example, you look at surgery (very competitive), only 12% of their spots are held by international medical school graduates.

    In addition, Isserson's book on residencies gives it one star out of five, where five stars is a very hard residency/fellowship to land.

    So it is safe to say that if you are intersted in being an oncologist, you can pretty much plan on doing so. It is a great field. I enjoy working with the population -- the only downside is that when you do new consults in a hospital, your patients are never happy to see you.

    Best of luck.

    G.
     
  6. Voxel

    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2001
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    2
    I agree that it may not be as competitive as GI or cardiology, but if he wants to go to a top program, it will be competitive. Try getting a fellowship at Sloan-Kettering or MD-Anderson, you better be top notch. I'm sure you are happy to get a consult and your patients are not. I think we all know why it is not as competitive as cardiology or GI, even though the compensation is similiar.

    Iserson's book is outdated in terms of competitiveness. Just look at radiology.
     
  7. MS05'

    MS05' Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2001
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does anyone know of any joint programs where for example you would do a three year IM or peds residency then at the same institution do the three 3 year Hem/Onc fellowship? I know they do this for some surgical residencies..ie do PGY1 in gen. surgery then do the next 6 in your specialty, just wondered if it works the same way for Hem/Onc...thanks.
     
  8. Voxel

    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2001
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    2
    Yes, they do combined "research" residencies in IM plus their subspecialties. These are usually available at top academic medical centers. A friend from med school is applying to these programs as well as regular IM programs. However, you had better show some real commitment to research. Either MD/PhD or some significant bench research during medical school. Usually you do 2 years of IM+ 3yrs research in the fellowship area+ 2yrs of clinical fellowship. Atleast 7 years from what I hear and you take call during your research years at some places. You should probably look on an internal medicine residency website for the exact details and contact programs directly.

    If all you want is to practice clinical medicine, I am not sure this is worth it.
     
  9. MS05'

    MS05' Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2001
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    0
    Voxel, thanks for the info. I guess what I'm really looking for is something like a program where you do 2 years of IM (or peds) then do 2 or 3 of hem/onc. I don't think I want to do the research, if I did I'd probably take a year or two off and head to the NIH (bet that looks good on a residency application). Anyway, anyone know of any combined programs like the above?
     
  10. Goofy

    Goofy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2001
    Messages:
    503
    Likes Received:
    2
     
  11. droliver

    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    May 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,552
    Likes Received:
    69
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    FYI: medical oncology is facing a HUGE drop in salary realted to decr. reimbursement for chemotherapy infusions by the feds.
     
  12. titan

    titan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2001
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for all of your input! This is the area of medicine I have been most exposed to, and gained the most experience with. Although very preliminary, I have developed quite an interest in medical oncology. Salary isn't very important to me, but practicing medicine is. I just want to choose the field that best suits me and my strengths while maximizing my potential as a physician. Thanks again for your replies, and I welcome any further input!
     
  13. Voxel

    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2001
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    2
    MS05' Taking a year off and doing research at the NIH/NCI during medical school will look impressive on your CV even if you are going for clinical heme/onc. You will probably be more attractive to top academic centers (if you have similiar numbers as other applicants) when applying for IM. Especially if you followed up on that research at during IM residency, you would be attractive to top heme/onc fellowships which are all academic and love research. These things show a serious committment to the field.
     
  14. AJM

    AJM SDN Moderator
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2001
    Messages:
    1,117
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
     

Share This Page