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Oncology question

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by qwert, Apr 16, 2002.

  1. qwert

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    Hey fellow premeds,
    I was writing one of my final papers and was wondering if anybody can help with this one.
    There are 3 tumors that need to be ranked basing on their malignancy: osteosarcoma, adenocarcinoma (lung) and melanoma. Not just ranked, but using some kind of numerical approach, maybe the number of pereferial metastases after the primary tumor removal?.. not that easy...

    any thoughts appreciated.
     
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  3. Scooby Doo

    Scooby Doo IEatShavedPussyCats
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    Well I believe osteosarcoma is the least common, then adenocarcinoma (lung), and then melanoma being the most common. That being said, melanoma is the most easy to catch but it's numbers are rising drastically. My guess is they are the same as far as malignancy goes...but the first two might be able to be swapped.

    So I am guessing
    1 <--> 2) osteo, adeno
    3) melanoma
     
  4. ckent

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    Not sure if you are looking for how oncologists really do it, but tumors are generally staged based on 3 factors:
    1. Tumor size (T)
    2. Nodal involvement (N)
    3. Metastasis (M)
    Generally, the higher the number, the worse the tumor. So a T3N2M1 adenocarcinoma would have a worse prognosis then a T2N0M0 (no nodal involvement, no metastases).
     
  5. qwert

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    Thanks people.
    I think I need to clarify. What I'm looking for is a _general_ potential of tumors to give metastases. Lets say the conclusion should be:
    -adenocarcinoma (lung) X metastases/100 cases (?)
    -melanoma Y
    -osteosarcoma Z
     
  6. kutastha

    kutastha 2K Member
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    Interesting question with many answers. Melanoma is the one of the deadliest cancers as it is most likely to metastasize. I'd say second is lung since it's pretty close to the vasculature as well, and then osteo since it's within bone, so more difficult to get out into the periphery.

    melanoma, lung, osteo.

    And I had to look up "pereferial metastases" til I realized you were referring to peripheral metastases.
     
  7. Scooby Doo

    Scooby Doo IEatShavedPussyCats
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by kutastha:
    <strong>Interesting question with many answers. Melanoma is the one of the deadliest cancers as it is most likely to metastasize. I'd say second is lung since it's pretty close to the vasculature as well, and then osteo since it's within bone, so more difficult to get out into the periphery.

    melanoma, lung, osteo.

    And I had to look up "pereferial metastases" til I realized you were referring to peripheral metastases.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Hmm...I guess I am off....There are more than one type of melanoma right? Malignant melanoma is by far the worst...damn..i'm all confused...don't listen to me :)
     
  8. AJM

    AJM SDN Moderator
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Scooby Doo:
    <strong>Hmm...I guess I am off....There are more than one type of melanoma right? Malignant melanoma is by far the worst...damn..i'm all confused...don't listen to me :) </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Actually Scoob, there is only one kind of melanoma -- the malignant kind. So melanoma implies malignant. It's kind of confusing since it's one of the only cancers that don't have carcinoma or sarcoma in it's name.

    Melanoma is the worst of the 3 since it metastasizes so frequently. You also see alot of mets with osteosarc as well, but I don't remember if it would be more than lung adeno (lung adeno is also a relatively frequent metastasizer).

    I think your best bet is to go to a medical reference book or website and look up the three cancers -- it should tell you the actual probability of metastases of the 3. If you have a library nearby check out Harrison's textbook of internal medicine, or Cecil's. Both of them should have that info.
     
  9. AJM

    AJM SDN Moderator
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    One more thing -- you may want to pose this question in the allopathic forum. The preclinical med students all have to commit these kinds of factoids to their memory. I 'm sure they would be happy to tell you all they know about these diseases. :)
     
  10. kutastha

    kutastha 2K Member
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    Thds of melanoma. For example, ocular, pulmonary, and the most common one, skin. A malignant melanoma is pretty much a late-stage tumor, i.e. just beginning vertical growth more than radial. You can have congenital nevi, which have the potential to become melanoma, then move on up to primary melanoma, secondary, then malignant. It is by far the most treatable of all cancers, since it's visible, of course. However, 90-95% of untreated melanoma have the ability to metastasize, and that's pretty bad news. The reason is because once the vertical growth phase begins, the tumor is so close to the vasculature that it can easily slough off into the blood stream and hit the liver or lungs. From there, it's pretty bad news.

    Wear sunscreen and get your moles checked.
     
  11. AJM

    AJM SDN Moderator
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by kutastha:
    <strong>There are several different kinds of melanoma. For example, ocular, pulmonary, and the most common one, skin. A malignant melanoma is pretty much a late-stage tumor, i.e. just beginning vertical growth more than radial. You can have congenital nevi, which have the potential to become melanoma, then move on up to primary melanoma, secondary, then malignant. It is by far the most treatable of all cancers, since it's visible, of course. However, 90-95% of untreated melanoma have the ability to metastasize, and that's pretty bad news. The reason is because once the vertical growth phase begins, the tumor is so close to the vasculature that it can easily slough off into the blood stream and hit the liver or lungs. From there, it's pretty bad news.

    Wear sunscreen and get your moles checked.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Hey kutastha,
    I don't mean this to sound insulting -- but I think you are confusing malignant with metastatic. The definition of malignant being the potential to metastasize. Even primary melanoma (melanoma in stages 1 or 2) is malignant, because it has the potential to metastasize, and a relatively high potential at that (although the deeper the lesion gets the higher the potential of metastasis it is). Primary melanoma is just a staging of the cancer, not a different disease or type of melanoma. Even primary melanoma has only a 78% 10-year survival rate, according to Cecil's. The most advanced stage of melanoma is metastatic melanoma (not malignant melanoma, since they are all malignant).

    As far as the different types of cancers you mentioned -- they are all the same tumor, just in different parts of the body. I agree with you about the melanocytic nevus having the potential to become a melanoma, but it is not a melanoma itself.
     
  12. kutastha

    kutastha 2K Member
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    No, you didn't insult me, you just redefined the past five years of my research. :)
     

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