OOS is irrelevant to private med schools!!

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slowbutsteady

slowbutsteady
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When will premeds learn that OOS does not matter to private med schools!!!?? They are not arms of the STATE!!!

There are 2 reasons that there is -- statistically -- often a higher number of instate acceptees at private med schools, and it does not affect your INDIVIDUAL chances of getting accepted:

1. MORE local people apply and, therefore, MORE get in!!!

2. For some schools, they might accept a local just because they think that person is likely to attend because the have ties to the area.

BOTH of these factors should have no affect on your own chances of success at a particular school. Just make sure they know you will come if accepted!

[Note: I know there are a handful of private med schools that, because of some tax deal or other with the state, do give a bit of preference to in state applicants.]

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^^ :laugh: love that pic


the only private places that i can think of that take preference for their states are baylor and miami

but yes, OOS generally does not matter for many private schools.
 
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Pitt and some other PA private schools give money to PA residents
 
^^ :laugh: love that pic


the only private places that i can think of that take preference for their states are baylor and miami

but yes, OOS generally does not matter for many private schools.
Mercer only takes Georgia residents.
 
When will premeds learn that OOS does not matter to private med schools!!!?? They are not arms of the STATE!!!

There are 2 reasons that there is -- statistically -- often a higher number of instate acceptees at private med schools, and it does not affect your INDIVIDUAL chances of getting accepted:

1. MORE local people apply and, therefore, MORE get in!!!

2. For some schools, they might accept a local just because they think that person is likely to attend because the have ties to the area.

BOTH of these factors should have no affect on your own chances of success at a particular school. Just make sure they know you will come if accepted!

[Note: I know there are a handful of private med schools that, because of some tax deal or other with the state, do give a bit of preference to in state applicants.]


I don't know about everywhere else, but I think this probably doesn't apply in, at the very least, Florida, because the state pays the schools like $20,000 for every resident accepted.
 
Rush is private and they definitely have a preference for IL residents.
 
I know....I was gonna apply there until I found that out....:(
they are pretty intense about it too...I had to get a judge to sign a paper stating that I live in Georgia lol
MCG just asked me to type my address in (a million times!)
 
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[Note: I know there are a handful of private med schools that, because of some tax deal or other with the state, do give a bit of preference to in state applicants.]

Here is where I might disagree slightly with you - I think it is more than a mere "handful" of private med schools that have some fiduciary linkage with the states where they are located that favors instate applicants - often it is tied to the hospitals where the clinicals are done, and the amount of state funding involved, requiring a certain percentage of state residents getting admitted to the school.

Nonetheless, the best advice for anyone is to apply broadly and see how it works out.
 
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then why does NYU have 40% ny residents?
 
then why does NYU have 40% ny residents?

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OP said:
1. MORE local people apply and, therefore, MORE get in!!!

Also, some self selection is going on. For example, if I applied to and was accepted at NYU and somewhere closer to home, I would most likely not go to NYU. If someone is from NY and gets into NYU, they are much more likely to choose to attend.
 
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Also, some self selection is going on. For example, if I applied to and was accepted at NYU and somewhere closer to home, I would most likely not go to NYU. If someone is from NY and gets into NYU, they are much more likely to choose to attend.

With all due respect, these medical schools get THOUSANDS of applicants from everywhere. They could pick classes with not a single NY resident if they wanted. I would think 40% from any one state would be a bit more than self-selection.

Anyone else want to opine?
 
With all due respect, these medical schools get THOUSANDS of applicants from everywhere. They could pick classes with not a single NY resident if they wanted. I would think 40% from any one state would be a bit more than self-selection.

Anyone else want to opine?

It only makes sense that private schools would want local students.

The more firmly entrenched the students' roots are, the more likely it is that they'll stay in the area and serve the local population after they're done with school.
 
With all due respect, these medical schools get THOUSANDS of applicants from everywhere. They could pick classes with not a single NY resident if they wanted. I would think 40% from any one state would be a bit more than self-selection.

Anyone else want to opine?

That means none. :laugh:

In all seriousness, it probably works both ways. Think of a positive feedback cycle; over the years, admissions people at NYU (or any other private school) get an idea of what most applicants will do. Say, for every 10 OR residents who interview and are accepted, only 1 has ever matriculated. Eventually, I have to believe that while this may not affect your chances of getting an interview (although it could), it is probably going to affect your final decision. If you made it clear in the interview that you have legitimate reasons for wanting to attend, that's one thing, but that can be tough to do if you really want to stay close to home. So, IMO it's a good deal of self-selection and maybe some educated guessing the the school's part based on self-selection that has occurred in the past.
 
That means none. :laugh:

In all seriousness, it probably works both ways. Think of a positive feedback cycle; over the years, admissions people at NYU (or any other private school) get an idea of what most applicants will do. Say, for every 10 OR residents who interview and are accepted, only 1 has ever matriculated. Eventually, I have to believe that while this may not affect your chances of getting an interview (although it could), it is probably going to affect your final decision. If you made it clear in the interview that you have legitimate reasons for wanting to attend, that's one thing, but that can be tough to do if you really want to stay close to home. So, IMO it's a good deal of self-selection and maybe some educated guessing the the school's part based on self-selection that has occurred in the past.

Actually, that makes a lot of sense. But I don't know why the percentage would be so high.

And, I did mean with respect. I respect you! :roflcopter:
 
[Note: I know there are a handful of private med schools that, because of some tax deal or other with the state, do give a bit of preference to in state applicants.]
It's more than a handful, so your thread title is misleading. I applied to Rush, thinking it was just like other private schools, but it's not.
 
According to the admissions office here there is no preference for in staters, but I suspect a significant number of privates do have some preference. It might just boil down to this or that program that is designed to allow pre-meds easier access to a given medical school and also tends to be mostly in state students.
 
I do believe Texas residents are slightly looked down upon as OOS applicants. I feel like a lot of schools know how cheap in-state tuition is in Texas and have had students pulled away simply by lower costs. Why pay $30,000 for a top OOS school when you can pay $10,000 for a couple of top IS schools?
 
Actually, that makes a lot of sense. But I don't know why the percentage would be so high.

And, I did mean with respect. I respect you! :roflcopter:

:D

I do believe Texas residents are slightly looked down upon as OOS applicants. I feel like a lot of schools know how cheap in-state tuition is in Texas and have had students pulled away simply by lower costs. Why pay $30,000 for a top OOS school when you can pay $10,000 for a couple of top IS schools?

Man, I wish I lived in Texas.
 
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