Weider

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I'm in the process of applying/interviewing to schools right now, and just wanted to get some info from people that are already in medical school about OMM. I only really know what I've read, but I was wondering what specifically you are taught in OMM lab, and how you guys like it. From what I know so far about it. ... I think it sounds really interesting, but if anyone can give me some more information on OMM then I'd greatly appreciate it.
 

OSUdoc08

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Weider said:
I'm in the process of applying/interviewing to schools right now, and just wanted to get some info from people that are already in medical school about OMM. I only really know what I've read, but I was wondering what specifically you are taught in OMM lab, and how you guys like it. From what I know so far about it. ... I think it sounds really interesting, but if anyone can give me some more information on OMM then I'd greatly appreciate it.
First of all, the amount of palpatory skills you gain in OMM will make you a very successful medical student and physician. For example, when doing a lumbar puncture, you will be proficient in palpating the sacrum quickly and finding the necessary landmarks. In another example, injuries to muscles, joints, and bones are much more easily assessed for injuries/deformities/restrictions if you spent much time examining the "normal" findings on your classmates.

Of course the actual OMM techniques used will alleviate strain/restriction in muscles, articulations, and other areas of they body. Many people visit physical therapists, massage therapists, and chiropractors on a daily basis to alleviate these very injuries.
 

aphasia

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So after having these procedures done on you all the time during labs, do you feel like a much healthier person? Just curious
 

raptor5

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No b/c it seems to be luck that my problem is always in a different area or requires a different technique than we are doing. Articular vs. Soft Tissue or leg vs neck. The chair of OMM has strict rules against treating people in lab. I say if someone has a somatic dysfunction have everyone gather round and see an abnormal get fixed instead of looking at normals all day.
 

OSUdoc08

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raptor5 said:
No b/c it seems to be luck that my problem is always in a different area or requires a different technique than we are doing. Articular vs. Soft Tissue or leg vs neck. The chair of OMM has strict rules against treating people in lab. I say if someone has a somatic dysfunction have everyone gather round and see an abnormal get fixed instead of looking at normals all day.
That sucks for you. We get treated by students and teachers in lab all the time. All you have to do is mention a possible problem, and they go right to it, even in the middle of something completely different. Even the chair of the OMM department will come over and do it herself.

It worked out well having flag football the night before OMM, since it's the only exercise I got last semester. You can imagine the muscle strains one would endure.
 

CA2008DO

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I really enjoy OMM. I think it is a tremendous asset and certainly makes me more comfortable when working with actual patients since it is a tool I can utilize and see good results with right away. Is OMM for everything or everyone? Certainly not. However, when viewed properly, as one of our many treatment options, I find you can achieve some fantastic results. As far as being treated in OMM lab, we do that all the time. The instructors and fellows are always glad to help out. I particularly like HVLA and Strain/Counterstrain. I get really good results with Muscle Energy with many patients as well.
 

mfrederi

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There are parts of OMM that are pretty cool. There are also parts that IMHO are down right bizarre and unscientific. That is not to say I have totally discounted it all, because in many ways being a Christian is bizarre and unscientific, yet I don't have a problem with that. However, you should see if you can find a way to talk to some second years at your prospective school or go to a second year OMM lab at some point. You should see some of the stuff we do, it really is crazy. If I would have known about cranial or some of these pelvic diaphragm releases, etc, I would have had a more complete view of what OMM is all about. The philosophy of OMM is one thing, seeing some of the actual stuff is another. I think it would help you to make an informed decision.
 

indebt

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OMM is a great class to teach in any school, granted only Osteopathic students have the luxury. Then again, I think Harvard just incorporated manipulative medicine in their curriculum.
Heres the pros- OMM allows you to diagnose more effectively and efficiently. Many symptoms patients present can be palpated by hand and treatment is not delayed waiting for a x-ray. OMM helps a lot in anatomy and vice versa, while learning how to treat structures you also learn the attachments and functions of these muscles. Knowing how to palpate for structure through skin makes finding and identifying structures also easier. From my experiences with my own class it seems that the student physicians learn to communicate a lot more effectively. In allopathic schools, most student won't have contact to patients until at least the 2nd year, while in osteopathic schools you have patient contact the first day (granted these are your colleagues, but we all have some kind of musckoskelatal problem). Students develop comfort talking about health as well as palpating and touching their patients from day one.
Cons- It is an extra class and if you want to stay proficient you need to take the time out to do it. If you have a partner that has no clue what he/she is doing you'll get hurt, something will spasm, and you will be sore. There are non-believers of OMM so that only makes your treatment and life harder.
Good Luck! Given the choice I'd pick OMM
 

raptor5

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That sucks for you. We get treated by students and teachers in lab all the time. All you have to do is mention a possible problem, and they go right to it, even in the middle of something completely different. Even the chair of the OMM department will come over and do it herself.
Part of the reason I think they won't treat in lab is b/c they rather have you come to the OMM office where they can charge your insurance and make some money. It is that or the fact they are trying to impress upon us the sad reality that we are in a very litigious society and we should not be practicing medicine w/o first obtaining a history before we do say HVLA on someone who has a degenerative spinal disease. Or it could just be the OMM chair is a powerfreak b/c I did see him break his own rule.
 

Echinoidea

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Personally, I don't really like OMM. It doesn't interest me in the slightest and I certainly do not look forward to lab. I learn it well enough to pass the tests and the boards, but thats it. I just happen to suck at it, and I can't help feeling a little sheepish when everyone claims to feel somatic dysfunction in someone and I can't feel a damn thing. I refuse to lie and say that I feel it as well. I have the utmost in respect and admiration for those who are gifted in it, but that aint me. Now, before someone jumps all over me for abandoning my osteopathic heritage, let me say that there is more to being a DO than OMT.

We don't expect everyone to love pathology, but we teach it anyway. In my eyes, OMM is the same.
 

futuredo32

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Echinoidea said:
Personally, I don't really like OMM. It doesn't interest me in the slightest and I certainly do not look forward to lab. I learn it well enough to pass the tests and the boards, but thats it. I just happen to suck at it, and I can't help feeling a little sheepish when everyone claims to feel somatic dysfunction in someone and I can't feel a damn thing. I refuse to lie and say that I feel it as well. I have the utmost in respect and admiration for those who are gifted in it, but that aint me. Now, before someone jumps all over me for abandoning my osteopathic heritage, let me say that there is more to being a DO than OMT.

We don't expect everyone to love pathology, but we teach it anyway. In my eyes, OMM is the same.
I am really not too skilled at OMM either. I just really don't have the palpatory abilities. But, I always end up with OMM partners who are great at it, so at least I walk out of lab feeling a lot better:)
 

raptor5

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I wish we would have spent more time on diagnostic skills b/c I still can not do intersegmental ROM to save my life, except for cervical, but maybe it is b/c all I see are normal young people who are not in any type of distress.
Just had a counterstrain practical today and can say I am glad that is over with. I don't get tenderpoints. They are not always there in SD but are often there without SD but any point will hurt if you push hard enough. Before med school I called then pressure points. Mostly my dissatisfaction comes from my questions not being answered and the uncertainty of it all. Maybe things will get better as my training progresses so I will try to keep an open mind.