OberynMartell

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I was wondering if those with some career experience behind them could comment on the opportunities for work in the ED. I have heard of family docs who have gone exclusively into ED work, but I know that some of them are older men and women who have been grandfather'd in. What opportunities have you had, and are these in smaller/rural areas or have you had opportunities in larger communities? How easily have you been able to transition to more or less ED, clinic, inpatient, etc. when it suits you?

I really enjoy ED work but don't know that I'd want to do it exclusively for a residency, and really have a passion for the variety of family med. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

azhrei

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Bumping this thread. I would love to hear from Docs out there doing this.
 
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cabinbuilder

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I have done it all: rural/frontier ER, nursing home, urgent care, hospitalist, and FP clinic. The big thing now is you need to be able to show your hours logged in the ER. Plus most midsized/large ER's are requiring ATLS, PALS, and ACLS before you are even considered.
 

LUCPM

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I have done it all: rural/frontier ER, nursing home, urgent care, hospitalist, and FP clinic. The big thing now is you need to be able to show your hours logged in the ER. Plus most midsized/large ER's are requiring ATLS, PALS, and ACLS before you are even considered.

Could you explain how one can keep logs in the ER? Is this done during residency (eg, take more EM electives or moonlight in the ER)? In general, how many hours are required to be considered for ER work? Thank you.
 

cabinbuilder

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Could you explain how one can keep logs in the ER? Is this done during residency (eg, take more EM electives or moonlight in the ER)? In general, how many hours are required to be considered for ER work? Thank you.
Well, I just got into the habit (during residency since it's required) of keeping track of every patient I see in a spiral notebook. I then transfer the info into a spreadsheet with pt initials, age, sex, diagnosis, procedure. It's also how I keep track of which charts I have dictated and done the charges on since I jump around to different clinics I differentiate my different spreadsheets into clinic/hospital/ER.

It may seem tedious but if you really want to work ER as an FM doc and you can produce logs, almost always will get the job.
 
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cabinbuilder

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George85

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You can still find ER jobs with FM training but it's a chicken and egg scenario - they want you to have experience. There are several one year fellowships in EM which will enable you to move into EM but they are not recognized. There continues to be a push towards using only ABEM docs in the ER. Even grandfathered ER docs are being pushed out - you'll notice that many jobs now state that applicant must be residency trained in EM. The bottom line - there will continue to be ER jobs for non ABEM docs but those will reduce over the coming years.

I am ABFM with EM training in the UK. Since residency I have worked ER full time. Prior ED medical director, currently Chief of Medicine.
 
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styphon

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Lots of the grandfathered ER docs were given chance to challenge the EM boards, but that chance is now long gone. FM working the ER now will not get the chance to challenge the EM boards.

You will likely not get to work trauma centers, major city hospitals, or very desirable locations - as these will specifically say "EM boarded only".

Instead if you want to do ER you will be practicing in places that EM board doctors do not want to go. For example, poor urban hospitals, rural hospitals in undesirable areas, Indian Health service hospitals.
 
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