BOHICA-FIGMO

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Since it looks like there will be no deferments in 2009 and my specialty of choice (EM) "requires" a GMO tour anyway, what are my options? Does anyone have a recent list of GMO billets? Someone posted a list a few years back, but the link has expired. Thanks!
 

Gastrapathy

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Since it looks like there will be no deferments in 2009 and my specialty of choice (EM) "requires" a GMO tour anyway, what are my options? Does anyone have a recent list of GMO billets? Someone posted a list a few years back, but the link has expired. Thanks!

There no longer is a posted list (hasn't been for a couple of years at least). In general there are:
10-15 Marine billets at Lejeune and Pendleton, fewer at 29 Palms and Oki
2-6 ship billets in San Diego and Norfolk with a few others scattered around CONUS and overseas
a few clinic billets here and there (fewer as time passes)
FS and UMO billets in a wide variety of places

Your first decision is whether you want flight or dive. This adds a year to your time as a GMO in exchange for a job people find more fun (which can make it easier to decide to bolt since you only have to extend a year to finish the typical obligation). If you want to get back to training after 2 years, the ship or greenside are all that do that. There may be 1 year GMO billets with the marines overseas but I heard they were going away a few years back. Ship billets can also be highly sought-after.
 

orbitsurgMD

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There no longer is a posted list (hasn't been for a couple of years at least). In general there are:
10-15 Marine billets at Lejeune and Pendleton, fewer at 29 Palms and Oki
2-6 ship billets in San Diego and Norfolk with a few others scattered around CONUS and overseas
a few clinic billets here and there (fewer as time passes)
FS and UMO billets in a wide variety of places

Your first decision is whether you want flight or dive. This adds a year to your time as a GMO in exchange for a job people find more fun (which can make it easier to decide to bolt since you only have to extend a year to finish the typical obligation). If you want to get back to training after 2 years, the ship or greenside are all that do that. There may be 1 year GMO billets with the marines overseas but I heard they were going away a few years back. Ship billets can also be highly sought-after.


Combat platforms are generally more sought after than support platforms, and some of the most combat-focused, like subs, don't have docs.
 
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FutureNavyFP

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Some advice given to me by a Doc: If you know you are going to do a GMO tour, start the conversation with your detailer early and call him/her often to make sure you can grab the "good" billets as they come available. Is this still good advice?
 

Gastrapathy

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Some advice given to me by a Doc: If you know you are going to do a GMO tour, start the conversation with your detailer early and call him/her often to make sure you can grab the "good" billets as they come available. Is this still good advice?

Use email. Its harder to lose. Also, don't expect any useful conversation before Jan (thats when returning GMOs have to accept/decline GME training from the Nov GMESB. Its worth getting your name in front of the detailer before that but don't expect it to have much impact.
 

navdoc47

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the best deal if you want to get back in residency fast is to do the 1 yr unaccompanied tour in Okinawa. It's the best kept secret of Navy GMO land.

You can bring a spouse, but he/she won't have all the SOFA privileges (like getting a drivers license) unless you can get the CG (commanding general) to sign her paperwork (i heard it's do-able). If you do an accompanied Okinawa tour, that's 3 yrs which I don't recommend.

the great thing with okinawa is if you only do 1 yr, then if you do a military residency, you'll probably not do more than your 4 yr commitment. Whereas if you did a 2-yr GMO tour most anywhere else, you might find yourself spending 5 yrs of total obligated service (assuming a residency that lasts 3 yrs, not including internship).

if you want to get out after 4 yrs to do a civilian residency, then I'd recommend flight surgery, if only for the fact that it's better to wear a flight suit than to be out in the field. downside is you get to learn the aviation medicine bureaucracy.
 

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I believe there are only 1 or 2 of these left. Most have been converted to 3y orders. And every PD in the Navy tells their interns to request it.

I believe Diego Garcia, Bahrain, and Korea all have 1-2 spots for 1 year hardship tours. I thought they switched Oki to 2 year hardship tours. Cool if they didn't.
 

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I believe Diego Garcia, Bahrain, and Korea all have 1-2 spots for 1 year hardship tours. I thought they switched Oki to 2 year hardship tours. Cool if they didn't.
Oki isn't a hardship tour, its a scuba diving tour. If you love to swim with the Fishes then Oki is the place for you
 

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I'm a bit surprised from what I've read in this thread. I was under the impression that most Navy GMO's were 6mo on/6 mo off a ship for 2 years. It seems I'm mistaken. Further the selection for where you're going to be sounds extremely random.

If someone who knows wouldn't mind, could you point me to a good resource to learn more about GMO's (accessible to civilians)? Or give a summary of the GMO for someone who only has been informed by a recruiter.
 

NavyFP

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I'm a bit surprised from what I've read in this thread. I was under the impression that most Navy GMO's were 6mo on/6 mo off a ship for 2 years. It seems I'm mistaken. Further the selection for where you're going to be sounds extremely random.

If someone who knows wouldn't mind, could you point me to a good resource to learn more about GMO's (accessible to civilians)? Or give a summary of the GMO for someone who only has been informed by a recruiter.

The Reader's Digest explanation of the General Medical Officer (GMO)

A GMO is typically a physician who has completed one year of post graduate medical training (internship) and is assigned to work as an independant provider. They provide primary care for mostly active duty members, but will occasionally be called upon to see family members. More often than not these positions are with units that have a military unique function and are not inherently medical. While not deployed responsiblities include daily sick call, routine physicals, and making sure all members of the battalion are fit to deploy. (shots, tracking illness and injuries, etc.) When deployed, you are responsible for the preventative medicine needs of the unit as well as taking care of routine illnesses. You make recommendations for members as to fitness to remain or be sent home if they have a more serious injury or illness.

For the Navy there are 6 basic types of GMO.

1) Marine Corps - GMOs are typically assigned as Battalion Surgeons and are responsible for the running of the Battalion Aid Station. If deployed to a hot zone, you may have trauma responsibilties.

2) Flight Surgeon - A GMO "specialty" if you will. These members are sent for 6 months of additional training in aviation medicine. They are run through much of the basic flight course and learn to fly. After that, you are assigned to a squadron and go where they go.

3) Undersea/Dive Medicine - Another GMO "specialty. These members are sent for 6 months of dive training and become certified Navy Divers. Probably the most physically demanding option for Navy docs. There are no doctors assigned to submarines proper. UMOs are assigned to sub squadrons, special warfare (SEALs), dive units and sub tenders.

4) SeaBees - A small, often over looked group. Each SeaBee group has a GMO. They attend Field Medical Service School along with the Marine GMOs. Again, you go where they go.

5) Ships - The larger amphips and carriers all have docs assigned. These are suprisingly sought after. I have often heard docs don't want to join the Navy because they don't want to go on ships. The truth is that if you don't want to, you won't.

6) Clinic based GMOs. Almost all of these are gone. With the transition to an all board eligible force, these are the very low hanging fruit. Historically, if a GMO wanted/needed to do a second tour as a GMO, they would be assigned to a clinic. These days are essentially gone.

Where the spots are is based on where the units are. If you look at a map of Navy/Marine bases. That's where they will be. The larger the number of units, the more opportunities.
 

SeminoleFan3

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The Reader's Digest explanation of the General Medical Officer (GMO)

A GMO is typically a physician who has completed one year of post graduate medical training (internship) and is assigned to work as an independant provider. They provide primary care for mostly active duty members, but will occasionally be called upon to see family members. More often than not these positions are with units that have a military unique function and are not inherently medical. While not deployed responsiblities include daily sick call, routine physicals, and making sure all members of the battalion are fit to deploy. (shots, tracking illness and injuries, etc.) When deployed, you are responsible for the preventative medicine needs of the unit as well as taking care of routine illnesses. You make recommendations for members as to fitness to remain or be sent home if they have a more serious injury or illness.

For the Navy there are 6 basic types of GMO.

1) Marine Corps - GMOs are typically assigned as Battalion Surgeons and are responsible for the running of the Battalion Aid Station. If deployed to a hot zone, you may have trauma responsibilties.

2) Flight Surgeon - A GMO "specialty" if you will. These members are sent for 6 months of additional training in aviation medicine. They are run through much of the basic flight course and learn to fly. After that, you are assigned to a squadron and go where they go.

3) Undersea/Dive Medicine - Another GMO "specialty. These members are sent for 6 months of dive training and become certified Navy Divers. Probably the most physically demanding option for Navy docs. There are no doctors assigned to submarines proper. UMOs are assigned to sub squadrons, special warfare (SEALs), dive units and sub tenders.

4) SeaBees - A small, often over looked group. Each SeaBee group has a GMO. They attend Field Medical Service School along with the Marine GMOs. Again, you go where they go.

5) Ships - The larger amphips and carriers all have docs assigned. These are suprisingly sought after. I have often heard docs don't want to join the Navy because they don't want to go on ships. The truth is that if you don't want to, you won't.

6) Clinic based GMOs. Almost all of these are gone. With the transition to an all board eligible force, these are the very low hanging fruit. Historically, if a GMO wanted/needed to do a second tour as a GMO, they would be assigned to a clinic. These days are essentially gone.

Where the spots are is based on where the units are. If you look at a map of Navy/Marine bases. That's where they will be. The larger the number of units, the more opportunities.

Are there any restrictions to these spots in terms of gender? Do we see any of them going away faster than others with the Navy's plan to slim down GMO positions staffed by non-residency trained docs?
 

NavyFP

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Are there any restrictions to these spots in terms of gender? Do we see any of them going away faster than others with the Navy's plan to slim down GMO positions staffed by non-residency trained docs?

Some of the Marine billets are restricted to women. Otherwise no. I would expect the UMO/FS billets to go down first. Many of those are less rank conscious. Marines really like their LTs, but most newly graduated FM/IM/Peds are LTs anyway.
 

EMH

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The Reader's Digest explanation of the General Medical Officer (GMO)
......

Thank you for the excellent response NavyFP. Too bad you can't know what your GMO would be before signing up. Say for example, if I didn't want to go to the desert and made that known, what are my chances I would still get sent to the desert? None of these sound bad to me, except for a marine GMO deployed in the middle east.
 

NavyFP

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Thank you for the excellent response NavyFP. Too bad you can't know what your GMO would be before signing up. Say for example, if I didn't want to go to the desert and made that known, what are my chances I would still get sent to the desert? None of these sound bad to me, except for a marine GMO deployed in the middle east.

Apply for UMO or FS and you can pretty well avoid the Marines.
 

orbitsurgMD

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Apply for UMO or FS and you can pretty well avoid the Marines.

Not hardly. All Marine fixed wing and helo squadrons have flight surgeons attached. They are a big part of the flight surgery conmmunity.
 

notdeadyet

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Not hardly. All Marine fixed wing and helo squadrons have flight surgeons attached. They are a big part of the flight surgery conmmunity.
I also thought there were some DMO slots attached to Marines as well. I heard that the Recon units use DMOs as their primary. I'm sure this is a small fraction of the DMO community, though.
 

F14Rio

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The Reader's Digest explanation of the General Medical Officer (GMO)

A GMO is typically a physician who has completed one year of post graduate medical training (internship) and is assigned to work as an independant provider. They provide primary care for mostly active duty members, but will occasionally be called upon to see family members. More often than not these positions are with units that have a military unique function and are not inherently medical. While not deployed responsiblities include daily sick call, routine physicals, and making sure all members of the battalion are fit to deploy. (shots, tracking illness and injuries, etc.) When deployed, you are responsible for the preventative medicine needs of the unit as well as taking care of routine illnesses. You make recommendations for members as to fitness to remain or be sent home if they have a more serious injury or illness.

For the Navy there are 6 basic types of GMO.

1) Marine Corps - GMOs are typically assigned as Battalion Surgeons and are responsible for the running of the Battalion Aid Station. If deployed to a hot zone, you may have trauma responsibilties.

2) Flight Surgeon - A GMO "specialty" if you will. These members are sent for 6 months of additional training in aviation medicine. They are run through much of the basic flight course and learn to fly. After that, you are assigned to a squadron and go where they go.

3) Undersea/Dive Medicine - Another GMO "specialty. These members are sent for 6 months of dive training and become certified Navy Divers. Probably the most physically demanding option for Navy docs. There are no doctors assigned to submarines proper. UMOs are assigned to sub squadrons, special warfare (SEALs), dive units and sub tenders.

4) SeaBees - A small, often over looked group. Each SeaBee group has a GMO. They attend Field Medical Service School along with the Marine GMOs. Again, you go where they go.

5) Ships - The larger amphips and carriers all have docs assigned. These are suprisingly sought after. I have often heard docs don't want to join the Navy because they don't want to go on ships. The truth is that if you don't want to, you won't.

6) Clinic based GMOs. Almost all of these are gone. With the transition to an all board eligible force, these are the very low hanging fruit. Historically, if a GMO wanted/needed to do a second tour as a GMO, they would be assigned to a clinic. These days are essentially gone.

Where the spots are is based on where the units are. If you look at a map of Navy/Marine bases. That's where they will be. The larger the number of units, the more opportunities.

Does anyone have an idea of the number of dual-designator FS billets that are still out there?
 
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