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Optometry school or Medical school for primary care

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Perplexed123, Jul 31, 2015.

  1. Perplexed123

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    Hi folks,

    I am still in college and am on the pre-med track. I am ambiguous about whether I should go for a MD in primary care/internal medicine or just go for optometry school. What is holding me back from medical school is that I am unsure if I am physically and mentally strong enough to endure the many years of sleep deprivation during medical school and residency.
    Now, I am in a top 20 liberal arts college and sometimes feel that my course load is overwhelming and I stand in the top quarter of my class. I know that if I am determined, I would most likely get through medical school but it will cost a good extent of my mental and physical well being as I often get sick from colds during the school year (~3 times; my immune system is kind of weak) and I often experience anxiety (managebale level) and get tired more easily than my friends though I am athletic and enjoy playing many sports. I more interested in pursuing a MD because I am genuinely interested in learning about medicine and I like to practice a variety of medicine with a depth. I enjoy being valued when I consult patients and encourage them.

    Since I have an innate ability for bussiness, when I get my MD, I would like to have my own clinic, settle down and work from 9-5. If I were to have a DO degree, I would like to practice indepently and maybe own a glasses store.

    Questions
    Will optometrists still be desired in the next ten years or that all these big retail stores will drain the profession dry in the future?

    To what extent do you have to sacrifice your health during med school and during residency? i.e. How do your health compared (when you were in undergraduate vs. now after or during your MD training)?

    Any other constructive advice to jelp shed some light on my current situation would also be highly appreciated!

    If you guys don't mind, please share with me a litle bit of the backgrounds where you guys are coming from.
     
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  3. GypsyHummus

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    Optometry is super saturated at this time. Head over to the OD forum and see the doom and gloom projected there.
     
  4. Neuroplasticity

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    Just another option to mention is dentistry. If you have any interest in working with underserved, I shadowed at a free clinic in an underserved area recently and they said that the community is really in need of dental care.
     
    Poit and Spector1 like this.
  5. Perplexed123

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    Yes, I have considered dentistry. But personally, I am not that fond of working my hands in a really tight space. But I will shadow a dentist to make sure.
     
  6. Banco

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    :naughty:
     
    Pusheen, Proteinz, darkeon and 4 others like this.
  7. Spector1

    Spector1 Orbis non Sufficit
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    wouldnt recommend optometry
     
  8. Perplexed123

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    Just found this great read on whether achieving a goal is worth the sacrifices by Lissa Rankin, MD. http://lissarankin.com/is-achieving-a-goal-worth-the-sacrifices
    An expert from her. I think this would benefit many people who are undecided to get into medical school.

    "For four years of college, I sacrificed the “typical” college experience – casual sex, sorority life, keg parties, and late nights doing crazy things – because I was pre-med, had 7am lab classes, and needed to get good grades so I would be accepted into medical school.

    After that, for eight years of medical school and residency, I sacrificed sleep, sanity, my health, my marriage, many of my friendships, and the financial security I would have earned had I gotten a good job straight out of college.

    For two more years after I was a full fledged doctor, I sacrificed vacations and time off and the luxuries I had delayed for so long so I could collect cases for my OB/GYN boards and earn a difficult board certification.

    Finally, at the age of 32, I had done it. I was a well-respected board-certified OB/GYN who had graduated from prestigious universities, and I had earned a full partnership in a group medical practice with a busy patient load and a six-figure salary.

    What I Gave Up
    But when I looked back, at the ripe old age of 33, at what I had sacrificed in the wake of my achievement, I felt sick to my stomach.

    I had married a fellow medical student, but as much as we loved each other, our marriage didn’t survive residency. I had then married a veterinary student – and that marriage hadn’t survived either.

    I had lost four loved ones, but I couldn’t even attend all their funerals, much less fully grieve their loss.

    I had been diagnosed with a whole slew of “chronic,” “incurable” illnesses and was popping seven medications per day to keep my symptoms under control.

    I was unable to take care of myself, much less another living being, so I had to give my beloved dog to my parents.

    My friends and family had essentially written me off as a lost cause. While they understood they couldn’t expect much of me because I was a busy doctor doing important things in the world, I had missed their birthdays, forgotten to return phone calls, said “No” too many times when they had invited me out, and failed to be available when they needed me. Over time, they had put me into the category of “We love her but we can’t count on her.” It’s not exactly a recipe for intimacy."
     
  9. WedgeDawg

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    I think the above is not typical of what you should expect - there are elements of truth in there (I can only speak for the pre-med school parts, so more experience posters will have to comment on the later portions), but they are far away from the average experience.
     
    gyngyn likes this.
  10. gyngyn

    gyngyn Professor
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    One thing I am sure of is that people can manage to make themselves miserable in any profession, however meaningful.

    I am a board examiner in the same specialty as the one quoted. My life has been lived to the fullest and filled with satisfaction. I have been a welcome participant in the lives of thousands of patients, students, residents and colleagues. I have served at every level of government and visited all the inhabited continents.

    It is difficult to know if this profession is right for an individual but expecting happiness as a direct result is a fool's errand.
     
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  11. TikiTorches

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    I guess she missed chlamydia too..
     
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  12. TikiTorches

    Physician Classifieds Approved 7+ Year Member

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    Agreed.
    My college roommate who was having lots of fun in college is now very jealous of me...
     
  13. GypsyHummus

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    Just goes to show you, the grass is always greener
     
  14. WingedOx

    WingedOx Unofficial Froopyland Forum Mod.
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    umm, plenty of us had lots of fun in college. We just studied a lot too.
     
    #13 WingedOx, Jul 31, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2015
  15. gyngyn

    gyngyn Professor
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    I had a boat load of fun!
     
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  16. TikiTorches

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    But were you out the entire week having fun like the rest of the kids who didn't have labs and classes at 8:00 am to contend with? If you did, good for you!
    I needed the sleep!
     
  17. Affiche

    Affiche SDN Gold Donor
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    Whaaaat? I don't feel like I sacrificed anything in college. I studied like crazy but I would have done that regardless of being pre-med or not. That's part of college! But I also went out every weekend, joined the clubs I wanted to join, maintained a relationship, and got involved in a fair amount of mischief! I do have a lot of friends that were also pre-med, but I've found them to be incredibly reliable and supportive people.

    Sometimes when everything seems to be going wrong, you have to isolate the variable. As gyngyn mentioned, it's not necessarily the profession, but may be the professional.

    Edit: I was fortunate enough to never have an 8am lab.
     

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