emoptions

10+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2007
12
0
Status
After visiting the program, I really was convinced that the rumors I had heard about low volume and lack of procedures at OHSU were false. I went and read the reviews at scutwork and found this one posted in 3/2006 that resurrected those fears. Anyone from the program care to respond. Here is the review posted below.

Schedule
This program had a very easy workload. 12-13 eight hour shifts over the month which includes a ride-along with paramedics and a couple hours at the poison control center. Half of your shifts are at OHSU ED and half are at the VA. OHSU has very low patient volume. There were many times when the ED was practically empty and I never saw anybody waiting in the waiting room. I was sent home from several shifts because it was so slow. At OHSU, students aren't allowed to write on charts at all but rather we had to fill out this wierd shadow chart, that was just tedious paperwork, instead. As a student, I had little say in the diagnosis and treatment of "my" patients. Oftentimes, the residents would just fill out labs, etc. without even talking to me. The VA was much, much busier. I had a lot more autonomy and was able to generate a differential diagnosis as well as labs, studies, and treatment plans. The faculty was much more receptive to having students there as opposed to OHSU.
Teaching
Some of the faculty were very into teaching (e.g. Dr. Brian) especially at the VA Medical Center but the majority were not. I felt like a third wheel my entire month. The residents were equally unenthusiastic about teaching and about having students around. There were zero opportunities for procedures the entire month as the ED generally gives EVERY procedure to surgery or transfers patients to the floor that need procedures so that they don't have to do them. I did more procedures on the floor during my medicine sub-I than I did in the Emergency Department and most of those procedures were on patients that had been admitted from the ED! There are formal didatic sessions every Wednesday that run from about 7am-1pm. The first hour is pretty useless as it's trauma conference where the surgery department just belittles their residents and interrupt the presenters. The rest of the lectures are fairly well given and there is free lunch which was generally pretty tasty.
Atmosphere
The residents all got along, but it didn't seem as if they really liked one another or liked spending time together. Attendings and residents got along well but it was definately a very formal relationship. They were certainly not on a first name basis. OHSU and VA EDs are very nice and new. No foreign medical grads...in fact, a resident bragged that everybody in the program was AOA. It showed. During slow times, the residents all quietly read to themselves, completely ignoring the med students and each other. As for life outside of work, the residents all said that they had a good life. I believe it. They have flexible shifts and work schedules. Only perk that I could see about this program.
Conclusion
I really hated my month here. The residents and attendings were just very full of themselves but not in that funny, aggressive, Emergency Medicine way. They were snobby and aloof. They treated all of us med students as if we weren't worthy of their time. This program was my first choice initially, until I spent a month there. I didn't even rank it. I would have rather scrambled than match here. Luckily, I got my first choice in resdiency programs! Other than figuring out that this program stinks, this was a totally wasted month. I learned nothing, was taught nothing, and could hardly wait for my month to be over. It was a miserable experience and the other MSIVs who were on with me agreed. We got together often and shared complaints about this program. It's a competitive program based solely on location. It's the only Emergency Medicine program for a five state area so for people wanting to get back to the Northwest, it's the only option. I opted to forgo a return to the Northwest for now...it just wasn't worth three years of agony and poor training!
 
OP
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emoptions

10+ Year Member
Dec 24, 2007
12
0
Status
i am surprised no one has come to the defense of Oregon. It might be that their residents don't frequent this site; however, it would be encouraging for someone with experience to correct the two negative reviews posted here. I know to take everything on the internet with a grain of salt, but the EM forum is pretty honest and will jump all over you when something is incorrect. All of the other 4 programs I am interested in have not received nearly the negative criticism as Oregon. This program is one of the most competitive in the country, but I keep hearing that this is due to location and not the program itself. I want great training and don't want to sacrifice this for location. When 5 different programs have been sitting in my #1 spot, small things really do matter. I hope to hear otherwise but this program is getting some bad PR.
 

WallowaWanderer

10+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2007
658
1
Denver, CO
Status
Resident [Any Field]
i am surprised no one has come to the defense of Oregon. It might be that their residents don't frequent this site; however, it would be encouraging for someone with experience to correct the two negative reviews posted here. I know to take everything on the internet with a grain of salt, but the EM forum is pretty honest and will jump all over you when something is incorrect. All of the other 4 programs I am interested in have not received nearly the negative criticism as Oregon. This program is one of the most competitive in the country, but I keep hearing that this is due to location and not the program itself. I want great training and don't want to sacrifice this for location. When 5 different programs have been sitting in my #1 spot, small things really do matter. I hope to hear otherwise but this program is getting some bad PR.
Sorry I can't offer you any direct advice. I lived in the northwest for 5 years and would love to get back. But I too had heard of Oregon's low volume, lack of procedures, and consult heavy environment - these things were pretty much deal breakers for me - this is in fact the exact opposite of what I am looking for. Volume isn't everything, but their's is 34,000 and that's pretty much as low as it gets - so the numbers are definitely consistent with what you've heard about low volume, lack of trauma, etc. It's never going to be able to offer you the depth and breadth that a program with a volume of 70,000 will. I think if you're a county person then you'll be miserable, but if you liked other lower volume, highly academic programs at tertiary referral centers then it might be a great fit.

I think the concerns you're talking about are pretty serious ones - it's not like how close the parking is and what the food in the caf is like. Personally, I wouldn't be willing to take that risk. I think if you're still in love with the place and are considering putting it in your top 5 then you should talk with some of the residents on the phone, go for a second look, hang out in the ED for a while, request to look at some procedure logs, etc. It still is the best program in the northwest, and you'll probably have a great alumni network for jobs. I'm sure you know that there are lots of other programs in cool places with access to the mountains, so you must have some reason to need to stay in the northwest.
 

newbie2008

10+ Year Member
Jan 21, 2008
1
0
Status
emoptions,

I also rotated in the ED at OHSU, and must have had a similar experience to your visit... I found it to be busier than stated and the residents/faculty were top-notch and cool. I have to disagree with the review you copied and pasted here on several points:

1) That review was basically a disgruntled review of the MSIV rotation, not of the actual residency program.. the workload was stated to be "light", but the residents work more like 18-20 shifts a month, not the 12 the med students do, the student should have figured that out. I agree that there are some things they could improve with the MSIV rotation regarding charting, roles, etc, but that shouldn't factor in a residency program review

2) Patient volume: though not a swamped LA County hospital with 120 pts. in the waiting room, there were always lines at triage and I was NEVER sent home early as a student due to lack of patient volume, that's ridiculous. I was carrying several patients at all times, the residents were very busy, and things moved. The rumor on the trail is that it's too slow, but almost every department I went in at 10AM on the entire interview process was slow. I think you'd get the volume you need here

3) Teaching: I thought almost every attending I worked with was really great, residents present each case directly to an attending. I never saw residents sitting to themselves reading, so I don't know where that came from. The residents would pitch in with some teaching points on some of my patients, more so when it wasn't as busy. I agree that trauma conference wasn't the greatest, as it's not as directed to the EM residents, but otherwise conferences are good and the faculty were very teaching-oriented.

In summary, I'd disregard that review you posted. The other students who rotated with me enjoyed the month as well, so it's not just me. The residents were laid-back but smart, the faculty was strong, and the volume seemed adequate at least, and better than some other places I interviewed....

Hope that helped...
 

EM doc

10+ Year Member
Mar 8, 2008
1
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I am an intern in the Emergency Medicine Residency at OHSU. I have to say that I read that post on Scutwork.com before I interviewed at OHSU. What I have learned after a year here is that who ever wrote that review is wrong on every count. I rotated at busy inner city programs with 70,000+ volume and trained as a Paramedic in Denver at DG. My opinion is that I see all the patients I can handle in a shift. My friends that are in programs with higher volume then ours don't see more people in a shift than I do either. So I'm not sure that volume is something that simply translates to more experience. The program director at Shands in Jacksonville (130,000+ visits a year) agreed with this. Depending on a person's level of experience you can only safely see so many patients per hour. So it isn't a linear correlation. As far as procedures, I can say that I have talked with my friends at other programs across the country and I have done more central lines, chest tubes, and intubations than many of them. I don't know how anyone can say we don't do enough procedures.
As far as an easy schedule, that is relative. We work 20, 10 hour shifts a month as interns and 20 8-10 hour shifts as 2nd and 3rd years (depending on where you are working.) I would also note that if you think you want to work more than that now, you will change your mind after a year of residency. I think our program is very strong. I would agree that its location adds to it's competitiveness, but overall OHSU is a competitive place to match. I would just end with this, don't read these posts for information about programs. I don't think I ever got any good information from SDN or scutwork. I wish that weren't the case, and here I am posting on the site, but what can you do. I just wanted there to be something out there that was more accurate about OHSU.
 
Aug 2, 2010
13
2
Status
This review is for the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) Emergency Medicine residency. In disclosure, I am an intern at OHSU. Last year I didn't see any reviews on SDN and figured I would post one since I now know much more about the program. As with all reviews mine is an opinion, so buyer beware. I'll start with an overview, detail the three year schedule, talk about the student rotation and interview process, then give some final thoughts at the end.

Overview
OHSU is an academic tertiary care 3-year emergency residency. The emergency program is a full department and well respected and strong within the university. The program is also one of the oldest in the country. 10 residents per year are accepted. The ED is somewhat lower volume than many training programs. This is balanced with the fact that residents rotate among several hospitals in Portland during residency. Also, there are only 2-3 residents and one student on the adult side (covering two pods). Basically, there are plenty of patients to see. It can be slow in the morning (department half full or so), but does get busy in the afternoon and evening. The ED places a large emphasis on customer service which is something you probably won't see at county programs. This means that there is a usually short wait times and rapid patient flow. There's a full capacity protocol to move boarding patients upstairs. Like everywhere boarding is a problem but almost all patients leave within a shift. None of the sign-out to me then I sign-out to you then I get the patient back the next day stuff that you see at some county programs.

The faculty is a mix of recent grads from around the country (almost all fellowship trained) and big-wigs in the field. One of the former presidents of ACEP is on staff as well as authors' of Emergency Ultrasound and Clinical Procedures in EM.

At the University, there's a mix of tertiary care patients (ie neutropenic fever), run of the mill stuff, and the underserved (homeless, drug OD, etc). There is no dedicated county hospital in Portland, unlike many of urban areas in California. There are two adult areas, an obs unit, and a peds area. The ED is certainly one of the nicer ones I visited on the interview trail. Almost all patients have individual rooms at the University. There's a central work station for the nurses and physicians. There's a call center for paging which saves tons of time. Residents have phones so the call center will page for you, then call you back on the portable phone. The VA is a little more old school (open bay) but has a dedicated physician work room and overhead pages you. There is absolutely no scut work like drawingblood cultures, wheeling pts to CT, etc.

Interns spend split their ED time at OHSU, the VA, and community sites. The VA has its own flavor. The patients are predominantly male and have great bread and butter pathology. There is a hallway for non-acute patients (ambulatory, no chest pain) and open bay for the acute side. PAs help with the hallway patients and you usually only see the acute patients. The nurses in the ED are nice and helpful, contrary to what I've heard about other VAs around the country.

Traumas are split with surgery. EM always does the airway. In Oregon, anesthesia does come to Level 1 traumas, but they defer to the ED staff for initial management. The secondary survey is usually done by the surgery team, but EM residents rotate on that service. Contrary to popular belief, there's plenty of trauma in Portland. Sure, it's not inner city Detroit, but residents feel comfortable handling trauma during the 3 years.

In regards to push back from other services, the ED has admitting privileges for internal medicine. You don't have to sell your admission. If they need to come in, it's a done deal. The only hassle I have seen is when a patient has involvement with multiple teams. They might try to push the admission on each other, but all you have to do is get them on the phone with each other.

I've heard negative feedback about perceived procedure opportunities at OHSU. All I can say is that my fellow co-interns have needled chests, intubated, put in chest tubes, given tpa for strokes – all in the first month of residency. I did two LPs in the past two days. Also important to know that interns get to work with sick patients right off the bat. There's no working low acuity for a year and then graduate to the acute side like some programs. In my first month, I've managed a massive PE, burn patient, NSTEMI, hyperkalemia, among others.

Conferences start at 7am on Wednesday with trauma conference. This is put on by the trauma service and reviews a few trauma cases. There's a learning point discussed with an evidence based approach for each one. Sometimes it's mainly surgically focused, other times ED management is the topic. This hour is also optional for ED residents. At 8 am, an EM M&M takes place, usually led by a senior resident. This is interactive and non-confrontational. The 9 to 11 hours are usually lectures put on by attendings and residents. At 12pm, there's usually a grand rounds or joint EM-peds, EM-IM, EM-rad conference. Also, the chief residents meet frequently with the residents to hear feedback/give advice, etc. Once a month, peds is the main topic for the conference day. Also, simulation is frequently done. There's a dedicated sim lab on campus which EM uses frequently. Attendings and nurse practioners (who run fast track) staff the ED during conference so everyone can go.

There's always a concern about autonomy at an academic center - both with EM attendings as well as other services. In my experience, autonomy is graduated at OHSU and as a senior resident you will be running one of the pods on your own in the ED. The attending will see each patient (on their own, after you unless a critical resuscitation where they will probably be in the room) but your plan is put in place. For example, an attending disagreed with my assessment in my first month of residency, but let me do what I felt was right. As an aside, beware of places where attendings are minimally involved. Remember that you are supposed to learn in residency. Trial and error with patients is an outdated model, dangerous for patients, and doesn't offer much learning for you. If that's what you want, skip residency all together after you are licensed and starting earning your own paycheck which will be a lot higher than a resident's salary. As far as other services, I can't comment too much on it since it is so variable. For example, with ortho, the ED team does simple reductions (shoulders, etc), but complex stuff will either go to the OR or the ED staff will run the conscious sedation while ortho does the external fixation/other procedure. You can always ask to be involved and services are pretty collegial with each other.

There are a few recent changes within the program. Ultrasound was added as a two week rotation during the second year. The ultrasound resident works one on one with a u/s fellowship trained faculty and essentially scans everyone in the department during that time. OB will be likely change next year. It's currently at OHSU and there's been some frustration with not getting enough deliveries since FM and OB are on service too. The rotation will likely be switched to a community hospital without other residents. Anesthesia by the way is at a community hospital and there are no residents to compete with. I don't know what the average # of intubations is, but one R2 I talked to said she got 70 tubes, including 15 peds, on her month.

Rotation Schedule:
EM I:
4.5 months at OHSU/VA/Peds ED. 2 additional ED months at community hospitals (Kaiser and Emanuel). 3 ICU months, one at a community hospital, one PICU, and one University MICU. One month wards, 2 weeks OB, 3 weeks Anesthesia (1 is peds only), 1 month Trauma. There's a little variability for each intern, b/c some do an additional Gen Surg night float in lieu of one of the community ED months. Essentially you spend half the year in the ED and half off service. ED shifts are mostly 10 hours as an intern. The VA is staffed mostly with interns so it's fun b/c you're working with classmates, get to see high acuity patients (the vets come in sick!), and have lots of autonomy (no Medicare CMS rules).

EM II: 10 months in the ED. Split between Peds (dedicated month plus intermixed shifts during adult months), OHSU, St. Vincent (community), one month back in the VA ED. Ultrasound and tox are two weeks each. 1 month SICU then you can put your pager away for good. 8 hour ED shifts. As an R2 at OHSU, you run one of the acute sides, splitting traumas with the other acute side usually run by an R3. You start to directly manage traumas and also psych patients (woohoo!) as an R2.

EMIII: 11 months ED (OHSU/Peds/St. Vincent/teaching month), 1 elective. You run Area 1 at the OHSU ED. All 8 hour shifts. R3s also have a dedicated teaching month without clinical responsibility. You help the med students and interns during shifts, give lectures, etc. Don't know too much about the elective, but some residents go overseas, work at mountain clinics at ski resorts, do research…

Notes: EMS is not a dedicated time period. There is a list of tasks to complete each year to fulfill the RRC EMS requirement. This includes some ride alongs, EMS meetings, acting as a paramedic, etc. I don't think there is a dedicated ortho month anymore. My take was that most programs haven't found that very useful since you are usually rounding on ortho pts rather than doing reductions. I'm also not sure about the exact shift schedule each month. I know residents usually get a 3 day weekend during an ED month. It seems most people work between 18-21 shifts a month. Residents get 3 weeks of vacation per year. Interns get an additional week at the end of the academic year. Traditionally, the intern group has done something together during that week (ie rent a house on the coast).

Last comment on rotations: OHSU is an off service light residency. You spend most of your time in the ED, particularly after your intern year. You will get 4 months in ICUs and one ward month. You can put your pager away sometime during your second year. You get to train at several community EDs which is a great strength. You will feel well prepared for the pace of community ED medicine. You will also be the only learner in the department so if something cool comes up, you're on it.



Student rotation:
OHSU takes away students for Adult and Peds rotations. The student rotation does not offer as much autonomy as you might see at county programs. You will split your time at the VA and at OHSU. At the VA you will staff with attendings and sign your chart over to the attending who will likely just co-sign it. You can put in orders as well. At OHSU, you work with a resident which come sometimes be a little frustrating since they are busy and not always interested in or have time for teaching. OHSU has tried to remedy this with a dedicated teaching R3 who does not have clinical responsibilities. This will certainly help the student rotation.
You will have the opportunity to interview for the program if you are doing a rotation. This will save time and money later and give you some interview experience. OHSU is a little quirky about whom they interview. I talked with students interviewing at Harbor, Highland, and other top west coast programs. Some were not offered interviews at OHSU. I don't know why or what the interview committee looks for in particular. My advice would be that if you are really interested, an away rotation is a good way to guarantee an interview spot.

I have one other downside to the mention about the rotation. Since the really sick patients are usually managed directly by residents, students don't get the opportunity to see some of the high acuity pathology that comes in. It's important to know that as residents, you will get this experience even if you don't see it while you are at OHSU as a student. You also don't really get to see the richness of the community sites which is a great strength to the program.

Interview Day:
I interviewed during my rotation, so I can't really comment on the interview day. I know the dinner is usually held at one of the many microbreweries in Portland. I've heard from other interns that OHSU doesn't really sell itself as well as it could. I don't think they play up living in Portland because they want people to come who are interested in the program, not the town. This is contrary to many other programs that do a huge sales job for their geography.
You should know that OHSU does zero follow up after your interview day. They don't call anyone nor expect a call from you. You, of course, are welcome to let the PD know your intent but it won't affect your application.

Resident Life:
The camaraderie among residents is great. Lots of people are outdoor oriented and there's plenty of options in the Portland area for recreation. Attendings and residents are usually on a first name basis (it's hard to call some of the older attendings by their first name, but I don't think they really care). The nursing staff is very helpful. For example, if you're suturing they get everything ready for you.

Interns have an orientation month in July with lectures, reduced shift schedule, and merit badges (ACLS, ATLS, PALS, NRP). We hung out a bunch and got to know each other. There's also a yearly retreat for all residents. Everyone is excused from their clinical responsibilities and every other year the whole group goes rafting.
The group of residents is rather diverse. Some went straight through college to medical school, others have previous residency training. Most have significant others and a few of have kids. Numerous residents have had children while in the program.

I feel there's plenty of life outside the ED. In the summer, there's daylight after 9pm so you can work an am shift (7-3pm) and get a good hike/bike ride/kayak/run/whatever on a work day. Skiing is 1.5 hrs away and lasts year round. If you're a whitewater kayaker, there are world class rivers in every direction. There's plenty of road bike rides and mountain biking is just out of town. The coast is 2 hrs away. Hiking opportunities are fantastic – there are mountain lakes, the Columbia gorge, St. Helens, the coast range, all within an hour or two. It does rain a lot here in the winter but snow in town is infrequent. Portland has plenty of city stuff going on as well (you might be able to tell that I'm not a big city person so I don't know details too well).

My Conclusion:

The standouts for this program include the great teaching faculty, good mix of pathology, and opportunities to work in community EDs. The pediatric experience is also top notch with a brand new Peds ED and Peds fellowship trained faculty (from both EM and Peds background). Living in Portland is also fantastic. It's cheaper than anywhere in California too.

If you want to do academics in the future, plenty of the young faculty are involved in teaching research and have great tips to offer. OHSU offers fellowships in Peds EM (2 yr track), Tox, International, Admin, Education. EMS hasn't been offered in a while, but they are willing to put one together if you are interested (all of Oregon's big wig EMS folks are faculty). Ultrasound is not a fellowship, but is taught in the residency curriculum.

Most residents go into the community, usually in Oregon. Though recent grads have gone to Colorado, Kansas, Minnesota, Idaho, Washington State as well. Working in Portland EDs is an extremely tight market. As an OHSU grad, you will have a super advantage with local connections and also you may very well have rotated in that ED. I don't know of any residents going to super-trauma heavy, very urban EDs. For one, Oregon doesn't have any. Also, while residents feel comfortable at trauma, they are usually not doing it for 6 hours of their 8 hr shift. I personally see this as advantage, because trauma is very algorithm based. If you talk to senior ED staff in the community, they will tell you the elderly are the hardest to take care of. You will see plenty of elderly patients at the VA and OHSU so you will be very versatile after finishing.

You are welcome to contact me if you have questions about the program.
 
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2008 EM Reviews

10+ Year Member
Nov 16, 2007
87
1
Status
Medical Student
Below are my biased short reviews:

Maine Med: +good residents, lots of camaraderie, cushy number of shifts, do lots of stuff in the ED (do not consult as much), lots of ED time as opposed to offservice, lots of outdoor opportunities in area
-not too much pen trauma, fair blunt, cold winters, small program, homogeneous population

U Mass: +good residents, very nice ED, well respected residents, good research, Hawaii elective, awesome helicopter experience, good reputation in area, great ultrasound
-hard to switch shifts, some unhappiness with residents, seemed like residents stay 1-3 hours after shifts for cleanup

Baystate: +work less than allmost anywhere else, good blunt trauma, good patient mix, very little offservice
-residents did not seem strong, faculty I interviewed with seemed disinterested, cramped department, city sucks and lots of residents live far away in nice town, bad ultrasound

OHSU: +very nice hospital, good research, cool city, residents were friendly
-small program, go to lots of different hospitals because primary does not see enough variety, residents did not seem strong

Carolinas: +great teaching, great research, awesome facilities, strong off service, good ICU experience, great reputation, strong residents
-lots of off service months, city not exactly what I expected

ECU:+strong residents, good teaching, nice department, great patient population, good reputation
-electronic records seem poorly implemented, city is very undesirable for some people

Wake Forest: +good teaching, good facilities, strong residents, good US
-Winston-Salem shuts down on Sundays

Christiana: +good residents, huge department, good records, good patient population, great benefits, nice facility, good teaching, very little off service, great ICU experience, great ultrasound
-area may not suit some

U Conn: +nice PD, nice facilities, good relationships with trauma
-area,

Duke: +New PD seems awesome, nice hospital, would be a good area to live in,good teaching
-not enough electives
 

Emergen-C

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Aug 5, 2002
228
1
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Attending Physician
I am happy to elaborate more about the places I interviewed...
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1) Denver: (+): amazing program, amazing location, 4th years blew me away managing ED. (-): almost no elective time
2) Hennepin: (+): very surgery-based program, Pitbosses run the ED 3rd year, critical care emphasis. (-): Minnesota.
3) Highland: (+): autonomous training, great group of people, nice location, self-sufficient residents. (-): unsure about strength of off-service rotations.
4) MGH/BWH: (+): great city, great resources, phenomenal international health program. (-) young program, 1 million potential consultants to be called
5) New Mexico: (+): great program, super nice people, SICK patients, nice outdoor recreation nearby, critical care strong. (-): location seemed a little ghost-townish for me, issues with movement of pts through department & flow
6) UMichigan: (+): huge critical care, no medicine wards, diverse training sites. (-): not a huge fan of the location/weather, worried about the # of consultants that could be called.
7) Bellevue: (+): big time autonomy, self-sufficient residents, reputation. (-) I am a little intimidated about the idea of living in Manhattan .
8) Maine: (+): the most friendly people ever, location. (-) seemed a little cushy for me
9) BMC: (+): location, underserved patient population, lots of trauma. (-): 2-4, PGY2s do ALL procedures in dept.
10) OHSU: (+): location. (-): didn't gel with the people
11) UC Davis: (+): sick pts. (-): nothing really set them apart, location
12) UCSF Fresno: (+): Yosemite, nice people. (-): couldn't really see value of 4th year, living in Fresno.
13) Stanford: (+): Paul Auerbach, lots of resources, bay area. (-): pts not sick enough, a little too academically snooty for me
14) BIDMC: (+): location. (-): unfriendly, extremely academically snooty people
15) Indiana: (+): fantastic program. (-): location

I also interviewed for the UVM Preliminary Medicine Year and the Transitional year at UC San Diego, so feel free to ask me about those...

Please note: the (+) and (-) are only my opinion. I'm sure there are several other people who had totally different experiences and therefore completely opposite opinions (which is why the match works!)
 

pirata

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2006
184
2
Texas
Status
Medical Student
Previous years' ROL threads were a great help to me when I decided where to interview, so here's my part this year.

My list would also be much different were it not for 1) a spouse in the picture and 2) my interest in international EM, so take it with a grain of salt and to echo SuziQ, feel free to PM me with questions regarding any of the programs I interviewed at. Honestly, I'd be thrilled to land anywhere on my list.

1. Vandy Pros: INCREDIBLE faculty, residents, unparalleled teaching, the PD and chair are a dynamic duo that are very involved in resident education. Busy, busy university ED where you see ALL the trauma in a large catchment area, plus all the weird tertiary stuff, and your bread and butter. Great international opportunities with the Guyana residency, New Zealand, ect. Off service rotations are great, peds shifts are mixed into your regular ED months, residents are happy, 10 hr shifts with 1 hr built-in overlap, COL is incredibly low, Nashville has a great live music scene. Cons: Less diversity (in both staff and patient population), you're in a smaller southern city (+/-). Caveat: I rotated here, so I'm bias in that I'd already spent a month getting to know and love the people. But honestly, couldn't find a better program on the interview trail.

2. Brown Pros: this was the program that snuck up on me. I even considered canceling the interview. Like Vandy, a university program with a large single hospital program with a huge catchment area, very busy ED. Happy residents, warm faculty, great peds experience, strong support for international work and opportunities (currently setting up a training program in Nicaragua), 9 hrs shifts all 4 years, Providence has surprisingly low COL for the northeast and is a great little town with amazing food and recreational opportunities. Cons: It's in Rhode Island, 4 yrs > 3yrs.

3. New Mexico Pros: another single-hospital system with a huge catchment area (which I like for the reasons above), incredibly nice PD, down to earth faculty, happy happy residents, strong commitment to underserved care with a large indigent community, great international/wilderness opportunities, one of the best programs for critical care exposure, great reputation, large Spanish-speaking population, only 4 months of call all 3 yrs of residency, 9 hr shifts with 1 hr built-in overlap, you have skiing and hiking less than an hour away. Cons: the city's economy somewhat depressed, less job opportunities for spouse (this program would be my #1 or #2 if not for this), less ethnically diverse.

4. Highland Pros: well-respected program, hard-core county training, in a beautiful part of the country. Great service commitment, residents are happy, strong pedi exposure at CHO, tox at SFGH, 8 hr shifts. Cons: the faculty are quirky (+/-) and somewhat inbred, very weird interviews, draw your own labs as PGY1, ED itself felt a little small, not a Level 1, the cafeteria food (yes, that's picky).

5. OHSU Pros: old, well-respected program with happy residents in a beautiful part of the country, diverse hospital exposure (university, VA, community), faculty very supportive of residents, 1:1 with attending as PGY2.10 hr shifts PGY1, 8 hr shifts PGY 2-3. Cons: low-volume primary ED, only 1 mo elective time, have to drive a lot.

6. Stanford Pros: Dynamic faculty, content residents, 3 hospital system with exposure to university (Stanford), community (Kaiser) and county (Valley), an AMAZING amount of resources for anything you could possibly be interested in, great fellowships, great international and wilderness opportunities, beautiful part of the country to live,time for research/scholarly project built into rotation schedule. Cons: COL (highest of anywhere I interviewed-this was huge for me), low-volume at primary ED (Stanford) which is where you spend 1/3-1/2 of your time, intern year spent with a lot of off-service rotations (including medicine and surgery wards and NICU time), 12 hr shifts, "country club" feel (the catered lunch comes to mind).

7. Carolinas Pros: incredible community program with great training, I loved the PD and faculty I met, residents are very tight and social, 1 hr conferences daily instead of a 5 hr block, single-hospital system, great U/S experience, starting an international fellowship, great COL. Cons: I thought Vandy was a better fit for me when it comes to Southern programs, their int'l focus is in Tanzania (my interest is Latin America), medicine and peds wards months, Charlotte, a very "proud" program.

8. USC Pros: Incredible faculty and residents who obviously enjoy working at LAC, probably the most amazing county training out there (certainly busiest ED in the country). Great diversity in both staff and patients, huge volume ED that probably sees some of the craziest trauma and pathology, residents run their own "pods" and jail ED, commitment to indigent care, in SoCal. Cons: 12 hr shifts all 4 years, maybe a little too autonomous for my taste, can only do international rotations on your vacation time, LA is not my favorite city.

9. BWH Pros: amazing resources for international EM, great U/S program, friendly, well-connected faculty, great opportunities for research and an interesting mix of pathology, shifts are a mix of 8,9, and 12 hrs. Cons: residents were the geekiest bunch of the trail (but seemed very happy!), greater focus on research, Mass Gen's ED felt very cramped, COL in Boston, 4>3 yrs.

10. Emory Pros: great service commitment, huge county program that is also academic, diverse residents and patients, busy ED. Cons: the number of patients I saw in hallway beds!, not as much international support, very county feeling, strange interview.

11. Harbor UCLA Pros: amazing country program in LA, great training, well-respected, good autonomy. Cons: not much international support, LA.

12. Baylor Pros: amazing county hospital with incredible pathology and young, enthusiastic faculty. Shifts 8's on weekdays, 12's on weekends. Cons: too new of a residency program.

13. Duke Pros: Dynamic PD, good mix of faculty, happy residents, time for scholarly track, COL. Cons: not very diverse, Durham, still young residency program, hard PGY1 year with lots of off service rotations, not as many intl opportunities.
 
Aug 2, 2010
13
2
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Hello,
I just posted this reply on another thread and thought it would be appropriate here.
I also posted a review of the OHSU away rotation at:
http://www.scutwork.com/cgi-bin/links/review.cgi?ID=1206&d=1
I’m not sure why OHSU gets such a bad rap on this website. These posts are several years old and seem to get recycled. If you look at the various threads they all seem to stem from one overly negative review from a disgruntled rotating student years ago. Lots of vague, third hand comments have been posted following that review. OHSU traditionally is not an aggressive recruiter for its own program and I think that plays a role into why this vague negative information perpetuates. Also, I met a number of competitive west coast applicants on my interview trail who were denied OHSU interviews. There was a palpable resentment with this rejection and maybe that plays out here. Personally, I had a bad away rotation at a well respected west coast county program that receives rave reviews on SDN. It simply wasn’t a good fit for me. I did not however write a slamming rant about that program. Even though I did rank it last.
I do think there is a strong county program preference on EM SDN. This is fine, just remember there are great academic programs out there. As I have mentioned before, be careful getting advice from anonymous peers in a competitive environment because hardly any of the information is verified. I like to give everyone the benefit of the doubt and find SDN to be entertaining reading, but I hope no one is making career decisions from chat rooms.
I would like address a few things brought up on this thread. I can only relate my specific experiences to counter the comments previously posted. I absolutely do not feel the attendings are rude/unapproachable/etc. I think this partially comes from some VA attendings who are a bit crusty. Visiting students spend half their time at the VA and it can be a bit intimidating. The VA staff fits the patient population – hard to explain but you know it when you see it. When I started as a resident, those same attendings were warm and welcoming and have been great teachers. There also is a difference in the involvement and investment of attendings with rotating students who are present for 28 days and residents whom the program has selected and are around for 3 years. I have found attendings to be enthusiastic teachers, provide great insight whether it be regarding patient care or career advice, and give appropriate autonomy. You will literally work side by side with founders of our specialty, including former presidents of ACEP and ABEM. Two of the six authors on the current Tintinalli are teaching attendings. I particularly found the dually trained attendings to be a great resource. Whether it be EM-ID, critical care, toxicology, IM, peds, research, international, administration (to name a few at OHSU) – all offer additional expertise that only one gets from years of experience and training. I’m very happy to be at a program where I don’t have to staff with senior residents. I strongly feel my education is better served coming from decades of experience – not a year or two more than me.
The program has been amazingly supportive of me during my intern year. They completely funded my travel and conference expenses so I could present my first poster. I received leave without question for medical reasons. And other residents stepped up to cover my shifts (and feed my dog) without a second word. We’ve been rafting, had parties for sporting events, and are going on a beach trip together at the end of the year.
In reviewing my procedure log this year, I have almost double the required intubations for the RRC requirement for the 3 years of my residency. I’m 3/4s of the way to the required number of joint reductions, central lines, and LPs. I’m halfway to the number on chest tubes and interns don’t even run traumas. I’m short on deliveries, but my rotation was cut short for personal reasons. I’ve run codes on my own, diagnosed a AAA on ultrasound, managed STEMIs, hypoxic PEs, strokes, you name it. I had a acute type B aortic dissection, severe lithium overdose, and a hypotensive Afib patient – all at the same time at one of the community hospitals. I ultrasound everything I can find and get quality assurance feedback. Like when I thought the colon wall was cholecystitis (heard from the rads resident first when the formal scan was done, then the US attending the next week). This is all during 6 months of ED time of my intern year. For complete disclosure, I included my off-service rotations on my procedure inventory.
I hope this provides some additional perspective. Feel free to contact me if you would like more information.
 
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quicknss

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Nov 17, 2010
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I second the fact that this residency is very selective and I had many highly competitive friends who were not granted interviews. It seems that rotating at OHSU really increases chances of interviewing and matching.
 
Aug 2, 2010
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This post should help clarify the trauma numbers at OHSU. I copied data from the 2009 OHSU trauma report. The link to the original document is below. Trauma activations are significant traumas (indications listed below). These numbers do NOT include ambulance rides for whiplash, etc.

At OHSU there are only two senior residents in the ED at any given time seeing trauma (interns work in the ED but don’t see trauma on their own). Thus, half of what comes in the door on your shift will be yours. For those who are concerned about seeing enough trauma, I encourage you to compare the hard numbers rather than listen to rumors. Remember to consider the number of residents in the ED as well since this will affect how many patients you see. For example, if a program says they get 10 traumas a day but there are 10 residents working that day, that’s only 1 for each resident.

In 2009, the Trauma Service at OHSU treated 2357 patients. This is 97 patients more than in 2008.

1506 (64%) were brought to OHSU directly from the scene of injury.

851 (36%) patients were transferred from another hospital; this is an increase in transfer patients of 25% over 2008.

1546 (66%) of our patients are admitted into the hospital

In 2009, there were 304 children evaluated as trauma system patients (up from 224 in 2008).

8% are level 1 traumas
26% are level 2 traumas
58% are level 3 traumas
8% – direct trauma admits (bypass ED)

Level 1 Criteria:
GCS < 9
Inadequate airway /need for emergent airway control OR presence of a supraglottic airway (KING, combitube, etc)
Systolic BP < 90 (>11 y ears to adult)
Immediate need for Operating Room
Patients receiving blood transfusion to maintain blood pressure >90

Level 2 Criteria:
Intubated patient
Two or more longbone fractures
Crush injury to torso or upper thigh
Amputation proximal to wrist or ankle
Pelvic instability
Paralysis
Flail chest

Level 3 Criteria:
Fall > 20 feet
Rollover motor vehicle crash
Death in same passenger compartment
Ejection from motor vehicle
Auto v s. pedestrian > 5 mph
Paramedic discretion: ATV, bike crash Significant intrusion/impact Hostile environment (cold /heat) Preexisting medical issues Presence of intoxicants Pregnancy

http://www.ohsu.edu/trauma/reports/traumaservicereport2009.pdf
 
Aug 2, 2010
13
2
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Here’s some more hard data about OHSU. Much has been mentioned about low volume. ED residents spend a large portion of time at busy community centers which adds to the number of available patients. The combined volume is over 225,000 patients for thirty residents!

One huge strength of the multiple hospitals is the difference in patient populations. Emanuel is inner city location, lots of crazy walkins; St. Vincent is older – lots of sepsis, codes; Kaiser is nice, working people (though sometimes with real pathology). You get to see all the major EDs in Portland. Fortunately, one can live within 20 minutes of all the hospitals so commute times is not an issue (this isn’t California!).

OHSU
40,268 visits – roughly 15 months of pure clinical (not counting ultrasound, teaching, etc)
http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/ohsu-hospital-6920570

Portland VA
Couldn’t find #s – about 4 months (intern months are mixed VA/OHSU)

Providence St. Vincent Medical Center
86,099 visits – 4 months (peds included)
http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/providence-st.-vincent-medical-center-6920540

Legacy Emanuel Hospital
46,485 visits – 3 months (1 is peds)
http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/legacy-emanuel-hospital-and-health-center-6920003

Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center
52,508 visits - 2 months (peds included)
http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/kaiser-permanente-sunnyside-medical-center-6920045
 
Aug 2, 2010
13
2
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As I’m thinking about wrapping up residency, I had a few random musings about applying for residency, doing well as a resident, and the OHSU Emergency Medicine program. Like all things on SDN, buyer beware.

Applying for residency

First, this sucks. I think it’s worse than applying to med school (at least you know where you have been accepted for med school). EM is more and more competitive and this doesn’t help either. Ask for help. EM attendings, students who just matched, EMRA website tips – whatever. Also, don’t skimp on any steps. One little thing can really hose your application, such as not doing an away rotation. There are lots of tips already out there, I won’t go on and on. There is one thing that I do think is important. When you interview at a location, it’s great to mention your ties to the area but don’t make that your main selling point to the program. I can’t tell you how many applicants have told me how much they loved Portland, grew up here, want to live here, etc. I know this. That is why you are applying to OHSU. Tell me something that you like about our program. Then I know you have done your research and are interested in the residency, not being on a Portlandia episode. Lastly, be ready for match day. Lots of people don’t get their first choices. Think hard about your top three. Fortunately, the statistics say you should wind up in one of these.

Choosing a residency

I think it’s important to think about what you want when to do you for a career when are applying. Do you see yourself practicing in an inner city, underserved, hard core trauma ED for your career? If so, apply to those programs. Are you into academics? Go to a place with good fellowships. Most people stay where they are for fellowship and it’s a great view of the program. If you choose to leave to another fellowship location, you’ll get great tips and recommendations. Are you into something outside of residency? Make sure your locations have this. I would go nuts if I couldn’t go hiking, skiing, or kayaking so I went somewhere where I could do this. If you are a dead set of a location to live in, it helps to do residency there. Most of the local EDs will have grads from your program and networking is that much easier. The best jobs aren’t advertised and you’ll need an “in” to get them. If you have no idea what you want, go with your gut.

Do think about the work ethic of the program. If they have 12 hour shifts, how many do you do a month? Make sure the place won’t grind you into the ground. Everyone stays an hour or two after a shift to finish charting. Six 10 hour days in a row are tough but six 14 hour days in a row will crush you. Finally, know that you will get a great training and love your program no matter where you go. To my knowledge, all EM programs will get you what you need. You will make great friends and have a life changing experience.

In residency

Congratulations. Now you can focus on learning what you want to do. Two recommendations:

Get involved in the program outside of your shifts. Pick a committee, start a project, whatever. Don’t say yes to everything but try and find a niche your intern year. You can always change if you don’t like it. By doing this, you will set up good relationships with a few attendings and expand your EM knowledge outside of clinical work

Second, get your financial life in order. Find a financial planner (one who isn’t tied to a particular insurance company) and take their advice. Usually they are free in residency. They can help you with the tips below.

A couple things to think about:

Consider Income Based Repayment for your loans. I poo-pooed this because I am in a three year program and most EM community practices are not non-profit. What I didn’t realize is that your yearly payment is based off last year’s income. Meaning, during my intern year I would have essentially payed nothing and had one less year of loans to pay off. Your second year will be based off six months of a resident salary. Still a low payment. Since I didn’t do this, I have 10 years of super high monthly payments instead of seven. If you are in a four year program, do a fellowship, or go into academics, you will save even more money.

Get personal disability insurance. You will get a killer rate and likely can set up to increase your coverage before graduating without going through underwriting again. This is a big topic but super important. You are at highest debt load, lowest income, and greatest opportunity for income lost. Don’t let one needle stick prevent you from not qualifying later in residency. This is worth the money/time investment!

Consider life insurance, particularly if you have dependents. Term insurance is cheap, you are young and healthy, and you can lock in a cheap rate for many years.
Set up an emergency fund. If your car breaks down, you’ll need to fix it and don’t want to get stuck with even more credit card debt.

Make a budget. The residency salary only goes so far so don’t push yourself further into debt. It also helps to start saving money for step 3, licenses, etc.

OHSU
In my intern year, I put up several posts to counter the OHSU bashing that I saw on SDN. That’s all pretty much old news at this point but those posts keep on popping up when you search for OHSU. I’ve had a great experience at this program. The program is very receptive to resident input and the program has significantly improved the three years I’ve been here. A few examples:

The peds experience is much improved. An additional dedicated month has been added. Now there are two months of dedicated peds ED and 2-3 shifts during every OHSU EM month. This adds up to about 4 peds ED months plus the PICU month. The RRC requirement is only two months and most programs still sit at that.

Interns now work on only one team in the OHSU ED. They used to spread between two attendings which made staffing kind of a pain. Also you now work closely with the third year resident who can give tips and steer your towards some good procedures.

A few things that OHSU isn’t great at: First, we aren’t a high volume penetrating trauma center. This is probably obvious. You will see enough trauma to feel comfortable. I’ve put in plenty of chest tubes. I think we average about a thoracotomy a month so will see the gory stuff. Next, a problem plaguing all academic residences is competing services. This is mostly an issue with orthopedics. If the patient is a trauma entry or followed by the ortho service we have to give them a call. Sometimes they will let us do the reduction but not always. We still get plenty of ortho procedures – usually at the community sites or the patients that aren’t trauma entries/followed by ortho. Lastly our hospital has a lot of ICU beds. We certainly stabilize the sick patients but they don’t linger in the ED for days. This both a blessing and a curse. It allows us to see more patients but we aren’t doing extended critical care. If you want to be managing pressors and vent settings every ED shift, we aren’t doing that. Some places have ED critical care pods. OHSU is not one of them.

In regards to all the digs about OHSU being low volume. One comment – it doesn’t matter. You’ll see plenty of patients. I’ve had shifts where I have seen over three an hour. We have only two teams and both teams see high acuity patients. One perk is that you won’t get stuck in a fast track or low acuity shift. At those big EDs, you can be darn sure you won’t be working the resusc bay every shift. I like the fact I get a variety of patients every time I go to work. At the community EDs, we only work the high acuity pods and can pretty much cherry pick the sick patients.

Good luck with you career!
 
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Colbert

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Mar 23, 2007
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Second, get your financial life in order. Find a financial planner (one who isn’t tied to a particular insurance company) and take their advice. Usually they are free in residency. They can help you with the tips below.

A couple things to think about:

Consider Income Based Repayment for your loans. I poo-pooed this because I am in a three year program and most EM community practices are not non-profit. What I didn’t realize is that your yearly payment is based off last year’s income. Meaning, during my intern year I would have essentially payed nothing and had one less year of loans to pay off. Your second year will be based off six months of a resident salary. Still a low payment. Since I didn’t do this, I have 10 years of super high monthly payments instead of seven. If you are in a four year program, do a fellowship, or go into academics, you will save even more money.

Get personal disability insurance. You will get a killer rate and likely can set up to increase your coverage before graduating without going through underwriting again. This is a big topic but super important. You are at highest debt load, lowest income, and greatest opportunity for income lost. Don’t let one needle stick prevent you from not qualifying later in residency. This is worth the money/time investment!

Consider life insurance, particularly if you have dependents. Term insurance is cheap, you are young and healthy, and you can lock in a cheap rate for many years.
Set up an emergency fund. If your car breaks down, you’ll need to fix it and don’t want to get stuck with even more credit card debt.

Make a budget. The residency salary only goes so far so don’t push yourself further into debt. It also helps to start saving money for step 3, licenses, etc.
Income based repayment, and it's newer off-shoot program, Pay As You Earn, are something you really shouldn't skip.

In IBR, you pay 15% of your discretionary income for loans each month and never more than your 10 year loan rate. So for me personally, I paid twelve payments of $0 because my first year was based off med school. My second 12 payments are about $13/month. So my first 24 qualifying payments will be a grand total of about $150.

If you combine IBR with a Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, which will forgive you of all your loans after 120 qualifying payments, you can easily get yourself forgiven for >$100,000 in debt.

This will free you up to put some money into an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) while you're young and have the enormous advantage of time and compounding. Your future self will really, really thank your young self for this. You can never get back time, which is an IRA's greatest assest.
 
Sep 26, 2012
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Medical Student
1) General: 3 year program that is one of oldest in the country and very well known. ~47K ED visits yearly at main hospital isn’t the large volume you get at other places’ however, you do rotate at other local hospitals throughout your training and are exposed to different patient populations and larger numbers. They did stress that they have less residents working every shift and therefore the patient per resident numbers are actually normal/higher than most residency programs. OHSU is only level 1 trauma in town which is beneficial for training. Trauma bays are nice and run smoothly and ED is fairly nice and new with mainly private rooms. Portland as a city is killer if you are into that sort of thing. Lots of outdoor activity and very laid back/friendly people. Great place to live but definitely not for everyone. Residents say that PD and faculty are very receptive to changing things if requested.

2) Curriculum: Medicine ward month still present here which is lame but not a big deal. Ultrasound is integrated throughout education which is nice. Weekly didactics seem well attended and were pretty well liked. Residents say that they have recently been changed to focus less on powerpoints and more interactive. Peds training is also integrated throughout all 3 years which is a bonus.

3) Pre-interview dinner: Held at local brew pub place and was really well attended by residents, from all 3 classes. Residents were super chill and easy to chat with. Seemed like great people and fun loving when not working. Very relaxed atmosphere and nice way to see a part of Portland if not familiar. Pizza was delicious as well!

4) Interview: Started at 9am with orientation from PD, she seems incredibly laid back and nice. Very friendly and easy going and seems to have great interaction with residents. 3 individual interviews for 15 minutes each and then two “group interview” sessions for 45 minutes each. Individual interviews again were laid back, no tough questions asked. Definitely more of a conversation than interview. Group interviews were also laid back, more applicants asking questions than being pimped. Tour of hospital and lunch with residents to conclude day. All in all the day was easy going and pretty straight forward.

5) Summary: Great program that has been around forever and is one of the top in the country and the city is awesome if you’re into outdoor/northwest vibe. Training will be great here and you will graduate with a very strong name behind you which doesn’t suck. Residents seemed very happy and content here, everyone I meet was enthusiastic and excited to be at OHSU. They all seemed very intelligent yet looking to have a good time outside of the medical world as well. Definitely believed in balancing work/play time. My one concern was low volume compared to other locations but seems like this is a non-issue because patients per resident numbers are actually quite high. I really don’t have much to say, everything is so positive about this place and will definitely be in my top few choices.
 

gutonc

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It is factually inaccurate to state OHSU is the only Level 1 trauma center. Legacy Health Emmanuel Hospital across the river is also a Level 1, and probably gets most of the penetrating trauma in the city. Emmanuel also has the only burn center in Oregon.
FWIW, OHSU EM residents rotate there as well.
 
Sep 26, 2012
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It is factually inaccurate to state OHSU is the only Level 1 trauma center. Legacy Health Emmanuel Hospital across the river is also a Level 1, and probably gets most of the penetrating trauma in the city. Emmanuel also has the only burn center in Oregon.
You are correct and I total agree that Emmanual does tend get more of the trauma than OHSU. By no means is trauma a selling point of OHSU. I would argue you will be well trained in this area, but this is not their specialty so I wouldn't recommend going there if this is something you have to have. Personally for me I feel that you would get adequate trauma experience at OHSU and Emmanuel and that there are many other selling points for this program that make up for this area they are "less strong" in.
 
Oct 15, 2016
9
2
Hey all, I used these threads (for better or worse), so figured I'd return the favor.

So for the elephant in the room, I interviewed with a few people who rotated at OHSU, and they also did not feel like their rotation was the best experience, mostly because they didn't do as much as they would've liked. That being said, they ALL agreed that this did not reflect the residency itself. So I agree with many posters that it seems the medical students rotator view does not reflect the program.

The low volume is simply a nonissue, the residents have high pt/hr ratios and that's the number that matters.

Pro: it's Portland (Like it or not, geography is the #1 factor people use when ranking programs). Residents were a lot of fun and relaxed. Well established, well respected, and competitive program. Pretty academic, and with that they have strong research/ultrasound/toxicology. Longitudinal ultrasound is a plus. The PD was one of my favorites on the trail. Faculty I met were very nice. They've been establishing a rural emergency elective that the residents were raving about. Residents all seemed very well rounded. I felt that for an academic program the community experience seemed quite good. I think the "junior attending" block at the VA third year would be helpful for preparing for attending life.

Con:
trauma is not the biggest thing here...if you need a wild knife and gun club this won't be it (I think people overestimate the importance of trauma, it's pretty algorithmic and you're gonna get enough no matter where you go, but that's another story). wilderness medicine not a big deal here yet. Not as much ICU time as other programs (3-4 blocks). A fair amount of commuting to make it to all the different hospitals at which they rotate.

I can't speak to the demographics frankly as I don't remember at this point, but since they rotate at a variety of hospitals I would imagine an equal variety in the patient population.
 

oshanimalia

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Aug 12, 2015
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I wonder how much of this has to do with racism. There's been a lot of research showing that, thanks to discriminatory media of Asian males, ppl tend to be very disgruntled when They workv under an Asian man due to performed stereotypes of them being "controlling", "misogynistic", etc, all of which come from selective stereotyping based on race and gender, whereas if the higher up was a white man, it would be lauded as "firm but fair", etc. Kind of like how q white woman taking charge is considered bossy, but a white man is being assertive, etc.
Any more recent updates on OHSU from folks who rotated there this year? Or are current residents?

Looks like the PD stepped down a few months ago (Exclusive: OHSU's Head Of Emergency Medicine Stepping Down Following Investigation | The Lund Report)
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medic86

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I wonder how much of this has to do with racism. There's been a lot of research showing that, thanks to discriminatory media of Asian males, ppl tend to be very disgruntled when They workv under an Asian man due to performed stereotypes of them being "controlling", "misogynistic", etc, all of which come from selective stereotyping based on race and gender, whereas if the higher up was a white man, it would be lauded as "firm but fair", etc. Kind of like how q white woman taking charge is considered bossy, but a white man is being assertive, etc.

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nick-young-confused-face-300x256-nqlyaa.jpg
 

oshanimalia

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Being cognizant of the factors of race and the effects it has on a demographics professional, social, and personal life =/= "race obsessed"

I get the whole anti SJW vibe that got popular after trump was elected, but that doesn't suddenly make everything 'race obsessed' whatever that actually means.
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Edit: I guess he removed his message, and now it looks like I'm talking to myself lol. Oh well
 
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oshanimalia

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I also want to take a moment to mention how ironic it is that we emphasize subconscious racism in healthcare so much in med school, that I'm frankly surprised that there's such a desperate need to drown my thoughts with pewdiepie level memes.

There's literally research done in washington indicating this specific discriminatory reality.

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Feb 9, 2019
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I wonder how much of this has to do with racism.

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From the linked article on this guy...

Multiple sources told The Lund Report that OHSU’s human resources department conducted a months-long query into Ma’s conduct that included an email he fired off to staff last July, announcing an educational event on ultrasound at Lucky Labrador Beer Hall in Northwest Portland. It said “if you are PC and easily offended, please consider skipping this event,” adding that it would contain graphic language, violence, brief nudity and a Guatemalan.

“Food and beer will be served,” the email said. “The ultrasound probes will not be the only things well lubricated.”

A physician told The Lund Report that the email “managed to offend every minority group in the department.”
 

oshanimalia

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Thanks for pointing it out!
From the linked article on this guy...

Multiple sources told The Lund Report that OHSU’s human resources department conducted a months-long query into Ma’s conduct that included an email he fired off to staff last July, announcing an educational event on ultrasound at Lucky Labrador Beer Hall in Northwest Portland. It said “if you are PC and easily offended, please consider skipping this event,” adding that it would contain graphic language, violence, brief nudity and a Guatemalan.

“Food and beer will be served,” the email said. “The ultrasound probes will not be the only things well lubricated.”

A physician told The Lund Report that the email “managed to offend every minority group in the department.”
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Listen2Savage

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Jul 29, 2016
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151
From the linked article on this guy...

Multiple sources told The Lund Report that OHSU’s human resources department conducted a months-long query into Ma’s conduct that included an email he fired off to staff last July, announcing an educational event on ultrasound at Lucky Labrador Beer Hall in Northwest Portland. It said “if you are PC and easily offended, please consider skipping this event,” adding that it would contain graphic language, violence, brief nudity and a Guatemalan.

“Food and beer will be served,” the email said. “The ultrasound probes will not be the only things well lubricated.”

A physician told The Lund Report that the email “managed to offend every minority group in the department.”
lol