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out-of-state tuition decreasing to state tuition after applying for resident status

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by basha, Feb 4, 2002.

  1. basha

    basha Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 19, 2001
    Does anyone know if this is true - If you go to a state school outside of your state (my state being NY), you don't need to pay out-of-state tuition for more than a year (cuz in a year you can apply for resident status). I think only a few certain state schools do this, and if they do, they do it for financially disadvantaged students only. Can someone tell me their thoughts on this.
     
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  3. mpp

    mpp SDN Moderator Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Jan 17, 2001
    Portland, OR
    Different schools have different residency requirements. Different schools offer different types of financial aid for disadvantaged students. Check with each school individually.
     
  4. yigit

    yigit Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Jan 31, 2001
    all around
    I'm a Michigan resident at UNC. I am really hoping that I will be able to become a resident since the difference is about 22 grand per year. You basically have to convince them that you are in the state to stay and not just going to get your education and go somewhere else. That is harder than it sounds. In fact there are lawyers here in Chapel Hill that deal with this. From what I've heard most people are successful by the second try...so second semester second year or third year.
     
  5. basha

    basha Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 19, 2001
    Can it be any sooner. You've no intention of practicing there do you?
     
  6. edmadison

    edmadison 1K Member 10+ Year Member

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    Feb 27, 2001
    Lactate > 15
    These determinations are based on the law of the state that you are moving to. States generally have different rules for determining who qualifies for instate tuition vs. who is resident for other purposes. Some states are draconian about their rules. If I remember correctly, in Virginia you cannot get instate tuition unless you have lived and worked in the state for a full year WITHOUT attending school.

    These rules have nothing to do with the financial situation of the students.

    If you provide some more information (i.e. what state the medical school is in), we may be able to provide more information.

    Ed
     
  7. basha

    basha Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 19, 2001
    Well thanks so far. As for the state the medical schools are in, mostly state schools in NJ, CA, FL, MA. And I'm a NY resident.
     
  8. basha

    basha Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 19, 2001
    Well thanks so far. As for the state the medical schools are in, mostly state schools in NJ, CA, FL, MA. And I'm a NY resident.
     
  9. USeF

    USeF sunny L.A. 10+ Year Member

    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by basha:
    <strong>Well thanks so far. As for the state the medical schools are in, mostly state schools in NJ, CA, FL, MA. And I'm a NY resident.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">From what I hear, neither USF nor UF has accepted more than a student or two in the past 5 years that was NOT a FL resident. There's just too many of us for them to need to go out of state, I guess.
     

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