Framecontrol

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Aug 1, 2007
158
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Optometry Student
Hey,

I was speaking with another member on this forum who is attending NOVA and we are confused about Out of state tuition at NOVA.

I have e-mailed Fran at admissions twice and I have gotten no response so I am not really sure what to do.

Question:
I live in New York, but I want to move to Florida for OPT school at NOVA.
Do you know if students would pay out of state for 1 year only, and then after becoming a resident (usually after 1 year) they can pay in state tuition?

I was told that this is not the case and that out of state students pay out of state for all 4 years.


Any info would be great.


-Matt
 

JMU07

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 16, 2006
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Optometrist
I looked at Nova too, and you're right. Their website says that if you are out of state at time of matriculation you have to remain out of state for all 4 years.
 

tbiv81

Go Gators!!!
10+ Year Member
Apr 8, 2008
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Philly, PA
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Optometry Student
That's correct. I just interviewed May 2, and I'm not sure why they told me (I'm a Florida Resident) but she told me I would pay the in-state amount all 4 years as what you come in (res or non res) is what you remain. NOVA is very expensive as the paper they gave me for the break down said in-state tuition plus books/supplies/room and board would be 49,500 per year. They also have no endowment, so no school help either. Out of state at PCO is estimated around 50k. Fran is probably too busy to return emails, so definitely call her. Changing residency as a Florida resident is very difficult. I actually moved to Florida to attend UF from NC and out of the 2.5 years I applied (after having changed everything, drivers license, bank accounts, registering to vote, bills, etc.) I did not receive a change in residency until my last semester......Now I might get screwed over if I attend PCO because NC pays 12,000 a year for NC (now I'm a Fl. resident) residents that attend PCO.....

Hope this helps, but I definitely recommend going to the school you like the best overall no matter what you have to do to obtain it. Just remember though, that being a Florida resident isn't really saving you a lot compared to the total cost.
 

fonziefonz

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Dec 3, 2006
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The estimates Nova gives are GROSSLY higher than they should be. Just keep that in mind.
 

jc812

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Apr 11, 2006
241
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Optometry Student
It's like this for MOST of the Optometry schools. I think I read somewhere that you CAN obtain residency at some school (I just don't remember it!).

I was thinking the same thing. As a resident for GA, I only have two options.

1)move and waste a year
2) pay loads more.

Right? Except, I don't even want to move and waste a year because it won't be guarenteed that I'll be accepted into the school of my choice!! Then I'd have wasted a year of living expenses, time, and pride.


Bottom line: you'll be forced to pay all 4 years out of state tuition. (unless SUNY, as you stated) So think about that when making choices for what school you go to!
 

eyepoker

10+ Year Member
Jan 29, 2008
115
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Optometry Student
I applied to 4 schools this year: SUNY, NOVA, PCO, UAB

SUNY is the only school that's friendly toward out of state students, I was making my decisions between SUNY and NOVA, and I called the dean at NOVA, he said because it's a private school and they have no money from the state of Florida, so it would be difficult for them to give residency to out of state students. Also from what I understand, NOVA also has very little/or no scholarship money from the school itself (I think there might be money from diff CL company---correct me if I am wrong), and the reason for no money is again bc of the private school/no funding, and they are also a relatively new school, so not many alumni donations like PCO or other schools have.

PCO is another private institution, but they have contract seats with the neighboring states--NC, MD and 3 or 4 other states, if you are from these states, they give you tuition reductions, it's usually a good amount of money. But the thing is they are space limited and first come first served, and so far probably all of the state contract seats are filled, so if you are from one of the participating states, you will have to wait for somebody who has the contract seat to give up/ or to wait for 4th year student that are on the contract to graduate.

UAB--they are also very rigid about their residency, so once out of state, always out of state for the entire 4 years.

SUNY--you can change certain things like switching your driver's license to NY and open a bank account, after you meet certain criteria, I heard it's not that difficult to obtain in state tuition--meaning you pay half of what the out of state students pay (26k vs 13k). So this is definitely an appealing reason for SUNY besides their good program and the NYC night life :D
 

gochi

10+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2006
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All this instate/outstate tuition discrepancy is quite unfair.

It seems to me as if NOVA would let in an appplicant with lower stats who is a non-resident just so they could benifit by the doubled tuition.

In the long run, how many of you think it would be wise to sacrifice a year rather then get into more debt ?

I really think that an out-of-state applicant with a definte GPA who could have gotten accepted with his/her out-of-state status, would not get in after getting in-state status.
 

AVkidd

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Apr 9, 2007
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The estimates Nova gives are GROSSLY higher than they should be. Just keep that in mind.

I was wondering how much the Average student pays at NOVA per year? It does seem that NOVA's estimates are quite high.
 

SarahNC

10+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2007
188
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Philadelphia, PA
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Optometry Student
How about this: How much money do you think you are going to earn when you graduate? Take 1 year salary: is that any less than the amount you would save by waiting a year and being in state? Probably not.
 

gochi

10+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2006
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How about this: How much money do you think you are going to earn when you graduate? Take 1 year salary: is that any less than the amount you would save by waiting a year and being in state? Probably not.
Depends where you work and your living expenses etc.