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DrSal

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What is the percentage of out-of-staters that Texas medical schools accept generally?

Can one apply for state residency after the first year or something like that?

Is their curriculum focused on producing primary care physicians.. b/c that's the feeling i get from the little blurb summaries that are available on TPR website.

thanks!
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by DrSal
What is the percentage of out-of-staters that Texas medical schools accept generally?

Can one apply for state residency after the first year or something like that?

Is their curriculum focused on producing primary care physicians.. b/c that's the feeling i get from the little blurb summaries that are available on TPR website.

thanks!

10% for all schools in TX except for Baylor which is around 25%.

Baylor and UTSW are generally considered the research schools, though there are DEFINITELY good research opportunities at all the TX schools. But I think all the TX schools, including Baylor and UTSW, emphasize primary care greatly.
 

DrSal

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ok, so "primary-care-focused" does that mean that their clinicals are not varied... or that their students don't get into like specialty residencies..or what?
 
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G_Eagle

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Students from Texas medical schools get into all ranges of residencies. All this means is that the schools might have more incentives for you to do primary care due to the shortage of doctors in many Texas counties. Do not think that your training at a Texas medical school would be altered to force you into primary care or prevent you from specializing. If this were the case, student morale would be low. Therefore, don't imagine that going to a Texas school means you will be the country doctor in the middle of nowhere if you don't want this. You can still be whatever you want. The clinics allow you to see all ranges of procedures and care.
 

Bad Mojo

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As an out-of-stater for undergraduate in Texas and now medical school in Texas, Texas residency is pretty hard to get. There are different ways to get it. In a nutshell (to the best of my understanding), you can work in Texas for a year w/o ANY schooling. You can buy property in Texas while in school and get it after 1 year. You can marry a Texan and go to school and get it after 1 year. Some Texas schools (UTSW for sure) grant out-of-staters an automatic $1000 scholarship that automatically waives out-of-state tuition. Thank you Southwestern. Hope that helps in some way.
 

jwright76

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Originally posted by Bad Mojo
Some Texas schools (UTSW for sure) grant out-of-staters an automatic $1000 scholarship that automatically waives out-of-state tuition. Thank you Southwestern. Hope that helps in some way.

Texas Tech also does this. Totally sweet.:horns:
 

XCanadianRagwee

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Originally posted by Bad Mojo
As an out-of-stater for undergraduate in Texas and now medical school in Texas, Texas residency is pretty hard to get. There are different ways to get it. In a nutshell (to the best of my understanding), you can work in Texas for a year w/o ANY schooling. You can buy property in Texas while in school and get it after 1 year. You can marry a Texan and go to school and get it after 1 year. Some Texas schools (UTSW for sure) grant out-of-staters an automatic $1000 scholarship that automatically waives out-of-state tuition. Thank you Southwestern. Hope that helps in some way.

Are you sure about the marry a Texan? I don't think that's right...everythign else is.
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by DrSal
ok, so "primary-care-focused" does that mean that their clinicals are not varied... or that their students don't get into like specialty residencies..or what?

No, students do whatever they want, there is no limitation or anything like that. But if you look at state schools in general, they tend to produce more primary care physicians. Likely has little to do with being forced to do it, moreso that its just the interest of the students there (and perhaps might be emphasized in curricula, but its by no means limits specialization)
 

OrthoFixation

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Since Texas schools are partially state funded, the maximum out of staters is 10%. Most stats show it is less, around 6-8% or so, with the possible exception of UTSW and Baylor.

Just out of curiosity, how is Baylor not public but receives public funding? Semi-private?
 

ms. a

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Originally posted by OrthoFixation
Just out of curiosity, how is Baylor not public but receives public funding? Semi-private?

I think that part of the reason is that Baylor agrees to cap the number of out-of-staters admitted. It is higher than the public schools, but I think it's still only about 20%.
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by OrthoFixation
Since Texas schools are partially state funded, the maximum out of staters is 10%. Most stats show it is less, around 6-8% or so, with the possible exception of UTSW and Baylor.

Just out of curiosity, how is Baylor not public but receives public funding? Semi-private?

There's a really long history, but basically Baylor COM moved from Dallas to Houston, and as part of that move, it agreed to get public funding in exchange for capping out-of-staters at around 25%.

There had been talk about Baylor losing state funding due to budget cuts, but the charter had ensured that Baylor's funding is tied to funding at all other TX public medical schools, so any change in tuition policy would have to be statewide.
 
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