Overall 2010 Overall Match Rate for Osteopathic Grads

wheatbar

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I couldn't find the overall match rate for osteopathic medical school graduates, but I found a way to calculate it for those that were curious (i.e. NRMP + AOA).

1444 matches for NRMP residency programs
1691 matches for AOA residency programs
218 for military programs

4106 total graduates

overall match rate: 81.66%

So what do the other 18.34% of people do that don't match? Are there that many people that need to reapply or find another career (after all of that debt and 4 years of medical school) since they can't get residency? The match rate for US MD applicants is 93.3%.

Source:

http://www.nrmp.org/data/resultsanddata2010.pdf
http://www.natmatch.com/aoairp/stats/2010sklstats.htm
 
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I couldn't find the overall match rate for osteopathic medical school graduates, but I found a way to calculate it for those that were curious (i.e. NRMP + AOA).

1444 matches for NRMP residency programs
1691 matches for AOA residency programs
218 for military programs

4106 total graduates

overall match rate: 81.66%

So what do the other 18.34% of people do that don't match? Are there that many people that need to reapply or find another career (after all of that debt and 4 years of medical school) since they can't get residency? The match rate for US MD applicants is 93.3%.

Source:

http://www.nrmp.org/data/resultsanddata2010.pdf
http://www.natmatch.com/aoairp/stats/2010sklstats.htm
You're forgetting the people who match into allopathic aren't you?

Edit: ohh i see what you did.. people don't usually call it that lol
 
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StayOnTop

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Wow, apparently a lot of people fail to match in the AOA match.
 

PunkmedGirl

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What is the total number of DO students going into the match?
 
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wheatbar

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Actually, the overall match rate is actually LOWER than that. The military matches were actually included. The match rate should be 76.35%. Please correct my math if it's wrong (the links are listed). That's much worse than I thought.
 

painmd87

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Interesting. I wonder if all grads reported entered the match. I wonder how many (if any) didn't enter for personal reasons, i.e. pregnancy, family issues, burnout, etc.

There also appear to be nearly 1,000 unfilled AOA spots.

Do these stats include pre-match and Scramble positions?
 

PunkmedGirl

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I read the numbers wrong....
 
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StayOnTop

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Interesting. I wonder if all grads reported entered the match. I wonder how many (if any) didn't enter for personal reasons, i.e. pregnancy, family issues, burnout, etc.

There also appear to be nearly 1,000 unfilled AOA spots.

Do these stats include pre-match and Scramble positions?
Yeah, there are a bunch of unfilled positions.
 

Kevin Baker

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Don't a fair amount of students end up doing a transitional year or taking time off to beef up the app? I'm surprised the match would be that high, assuming the transitional year people aren't counted.
 

StayOnTop

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Don't a fair amount of students end up doing a transitional year or taking time off to beef up the app? I'm surprised the match would be that high, assuming the transitional year people aren't counted.
What? transitional year people aren't counted?
 

StayOnTop

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These numbers clearly don't include the scramble if there are that many unfilled positions still available. I'm thinking that maybe people who apply to both AOA and ACGME tend to aim for much more competitive specialties in the AOA, and lesser ones in ACGME. It would make sense, then, if they don't match AOA, and have so many unfilled positions left.
 

TriagePreMed

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Could this be that 18% include those that a) didn't apply, or b) applied to only crazy hard specialties?
 

Kalu123

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Does this number include the number of people who match to dually accredited ACGME/AOA residencies? Or is this only accounting for ACGME-only + AOA-only residencies?
 

InTheMaking

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Could this be that 18% include those that a) didn't apply, or b) applied to only crazy hard specialties?
a) After medical school you don't just "not apply" to the match.
b) Many students don't match and they subsequently go into a scramble, where they try to find a residency program. After scramble most students have found a residency spot. It is rare that a student does not go on to a residency after medical school (alot of people call this "career suicide")
 

ShyRem

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It was quite surprising to me that about 10% of my class chose not to enter the match. They did either research, international work, or time off.
 

NYEMMED

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Many schools also have scholars/ fellows programs where some students stay at the school for an additional year and teach while earning a masters degree and the school pays of most of their student debt. It is a scholarship type program at many schools. They wouldn't have gone into the match until the next year....
 

JaggerPlate

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I'm a bit confused by the numbers here ... this is still above my pay grade, but I think that somehow, these calculations aren't taking into consideration the applicants who applied AOA and ACGME, and were automatically withdrawn from one (which probably counts as 'entered but did not match') when matched the other.

I hope some of the residents, 3/4th years, etc, come in and help!
 

StayOnTop

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I'm a bit confused by the numbers here ... this is still above my pay grade, but I think that somehow, these calculations aren't taking into consideration the applicants who applied AOA and ACGME, and were automatically withdrawn from one (which probably counts as 'entered but did not match') when matched the other.

I hope some of the residents, 3/4th years, etc, come in and help!
I don't think it has to do with that. It looks like he just counted the number of people who matched into AOA, and matched into ACGME, then added that figure and divided by the total number of DO graduates. Although, this doesn't count scramble figure, as close to 1000 AOA residency positions were left unfilled after the DO match.
 

JaggerPlate

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I don't think it has to do with that. It looks like he just counted the number of people who matched into AOA, and matched into ACGME, then added that figure and divided by the total number of DO graduates. Although, this doesn't count scramble figure, as close to 1000 AOA residency positions were left unfilled after the DO match.
Maybe ... something seems goofy with the numbers though. Unfortunately, I'm too damn busy to spend any significant amount of time figuring it out though. Hopefully someone smarter can do it quicker!
 
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Do unfilled AOA residencies with a few remaining spots purposely not pick certain candidates that weren't up to their standards leaving open spots, or were there simply not enough applicants to those programs? I'm speaking specifically for some of the surgical ones, as opposed to the FP and IM ones with a huge excess of unfilled.

EDIT: I wanted to add: Are they intentionally leaving it unfilled so that they could possibly have someone transfer in to the program if that person was unhappy with their primary residency choice?
 
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Do unfilled AOA residencies with a few remaining spots purposely not pick certain candidates that weren't up to their standards leaving open spots, or were there simply not enough applicants to those programs? I'm speaking specifically for some of the surgical ones, as opposed to the FP and IM ones with a huge excess of unfilled.

EDIT: I wanted to add: Are they intentionally leaving it unfilled so that they could possibly have someone transfer in to the program if that person was unhappy with their primary residency choice?

It looks bad for programs to leave open spots.


Also, the AOA figure shows current grads and previous grads, and the calculation was using both those figures. If the match is ~80% overall, then I don't think it's that bad. MD match is ~93% for MD's, so I think the 13% difference is not all that bad. You get people in both fields who decide to take time off, do post docs, work for pharmaceutical companies, etc..


I also think those match numbers include the scramble.
 

StayOnTop

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It looks bad for programs to leave open spots.


Also, the AOA figure shows current grads and previous grads, and the calculation was using both those figures. If the match is ~80% overall, then I don't think it's that bad. MD match is ~93% for MD's, so I think the 13% difference is not all that bad. You get people in both fields who decide to take time off, do post docs, work for pharmaceutical companies, etc..


I also think those match numbers include the scramble.
I don't think so. The AOA website seems to generalize things into pre-match and post-match. It gives the number of applicants who matched (post-match), but it also states how many positions were left unfilled after the match. Those positions could stay unfilled for a very long time, and I doubt that they are continuously updating their post-match numbers, everytime an unfilled position becomes filled.
 
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I don't think so. The AOA website seems to generalize things into pre-match and post-match. It gives the number of applicants who matched (post-match), but it also states how many positions were left unfilled after the match. Those positions could stay unfilled for a very long time, and I doubt that they are continuously updating their post-match numbers, everytime an unfilled position becomes filled.

They are match numbers. They publish them at the end of the season. This includes the scramble.
 

StayOnTop

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They are match numbers. They publish them at the end of the season. This includes the scramble.
I don't think so, look at the numbers.

There were 1473 filled positions, 970 unfilled positions "post match".

Then, there are a reported 1691 (including 218 who matched through the military) matched graduates. (1691-218=1473)

Unless there are still 970 AOA positions unfilled after the match, these numbers don't include the scramble.
 
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I don't think so, look at the numbers.

There were 1473 filled positions, 970 unfilled positions "post match".

Then, there are a reported 1691 (including 218 who matched through the military) matched graduates. (1691-218=1473)

Unless there are still 970 AOA positions unfilled after the match, these numbers don't include the scramble.
Just because they have a lot of available positions doesn't mean that they don't include the scramble, but after doing some quick looking, I think you might be right.

Here is a quote from an AOA publication from 2008:

http://www.do-online.org/pdf/sir_commatch.pdf

AOA Pub said:
What are the current Match statistics for osteopathic medical students?

In 2008, 82 % of the students participating in the AOA Match program
matched into their first choice. According to AOA 2008 Match data, there
were 3,600 potential osteopathic participants (3,462 students graduating and
138 previous AOA graduates). A total of 1,626 participated in the AOA Match
and 1,870 osteopathic medical students participated in the NRMP Match or
both, of which 531 did not successfully match. Eventually, after the scramble
process, our trend data shows a little more than 50% of graduating osteopathic
medical students will contract with AOA training programs.
So, it sounds like the data does not include scramble numbers, at least according to this.
 

StayOnTop

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Just because they have a lot of available positions doesn't mean that they don't include the scramble, but after doing some quick looking, I think you might be right.

Here is a quote from an AOA publication from 2008:

http://www.do-online.org/pdf/sir_commatch.pdf



So, it sounds like the data does not include scramble numbers, at least according to this.
Those numbers also help solve a lot of questions. OK, doing the math. PRE-SCRAMBLE: 85% of DO graduates (who participated in the match) matched into something (AOA+NRMP) in 2008.

I'm not too sure what that number would be after the scramble, but it should bump up the figure past 90%. Since DO numbers have actually gotten better in the NRMP match since then, and more spots have been added in the AOA match, I've going to assume that match results should either stay consistent or have improved since then.
 

MLT2MT2DO

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Another thing that hasn't been mentioned yet. DO's have the option of pre-matching into ACGME residiencies. I'm sure it is not a huge % that do this but I'm sure it is probably enough to note.
 
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Another thing that hasn't been mentioned yet. DO's have the option of pre-matching into ACGME residiencies. I'm sure it is not a huge % that do this but I'm sure it is probably enough to note.
how does one prematch into an acgme residency? do they have to use their 4th year elective rotations to go through acgme programs?
 

JaggerPlate

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how does one prematch into an acgme residency? do they have to use their 4th year elective rotations to go through acgme programs?
It has to do with the fact that DOs are independent candidates, so ACGME programs can kind of make deals with them before the match officially starts. An audition rotation is just a rotation you use to show off at a program where you would like to match. Technically an audition rotation could theoretically help you gain a spot, but I don't see any further correlation between the two.
 
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It has to do with the fact that DOs are independent candidates, so ACGME programs can kind of make deals with them before the match officially starts. An audition rotation is just a rotation you use to show off at a program where you would like to match. Technically an audition rotation could theoretically help you gain a spot, but I don't see any further correlation between the two.
OK that's fair, but wouldn't you need the audition rotation to even have a chance of pre-matching? How else would the program even know you exist?

ie. you go to a DO school and you want to match in your home town with an ACGME residency. How else would you get on their radar for a pre-match offer other than an audition rotation?
 

Everglide

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These are numbers from Diane Burkhart, Director of the Department of Education at the AOA, from the recent AOA confrence in San Fran... Copied and pasted from a report:

"-In 2010, 51% of osteopathic students matched into AOA residencies. 36% of the 51 was by an actual match and 15% was through the scramble process.

-In 2010 there was an 84% fill rate for funded AOA residencies. This percentage has increased over the past five years. This is concerning because approximately 10% of AOA residencies are considered "undesirable" due to their location or particular specialty.

-In 2010, 51% of students matched into AOA positions, 43.4% into ACGME, and 5.3% went into the military."


tbh I'm not quite sure what to make of those numbers but there you go. Maybe it could help fill in some gaps.
 

JaggerPlate

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OK that's fair, but wouldn't you need the audition rotation to even have a chance of pre-matching? How else would the program even know you exist?

ie. you go to a DO school and you want to match in your home town with an ACGME residency. How else would you get on their radar for a pre-match offer other than an audition rotation?
Probably. Audition rotations are bigger in the AOA world though. If it's a pre-match offer, they would probably need to know you well, which would probably happen via an audition rotation. If you're just trying to get an interview at a certain ACGME program, it's my understanding that stats go further than audition (which isn't necessarily true in the AOA world).
 

MLT2MT2DO

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OK that's fair, but wouldn't you need the audition rotation to even have a chance of pre-matching? How else would the program even know you exist?

ie. you go to a DO school and you want to match in your home town with an ACGME residency. How else would you get on their radar for a pre-match offer other than an audition rotation?

You still apply for the match and go to interview at places. It is usually after the interview but before the match that pre-match offers are given. If one accepts a pre-match, they then must withdraw from the match process.
 

scpod

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....How else would you get on their radar for a pre-match offer other than an audition rotation?
Pre-match offers are given to quite a few people after just interviewing for the program.
 

naus

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These are numbers from Diane Burkhart, Director of the Department of Education at the AOA, from the recent AOA confrence in San Fran... Copied and pasted from a report:

"-In 2010, 51% of osteopathic students matched into AOA residencies. 36% of the 51 was by an actual match and 15% was through the scramble process.

-In 2010 there was an 84% fill rate for funded AOA residencies. This percentage has increased over the past five years. This is concerning because approximately 10% of AOA residencies are considered "undesirable" due to their location or particular specialty.

-In 2010, 51% of students matched into AOA positions, 43.4% into ACGME, and 5.3% went into the military."


tbh I'm not quite sure what to make of those numbers but there you go. Maybe it could help fill in some gaps.
What I first thought from your information was: 36% of osteopathic students matched AOA before the scramble + 43.4% of DOs matched ACGME = 79.4% total who matched pre-scramble, and then add 15% who later scrambled, plus 5.3% military for a total match rate of 99.7%. But 99.7% of osteopathic students matching is not a believable number considering MD schools are around 95%. 99.7% is a rounding error from 100%.

So I conclude that these percentages from Diane Burkhart include only DOs who matched at AOA, ACGME or military, and not DOs who didn't match at all. It's fudged like law school median salary reports.

So what is the actual match rate for DOs? I think the OP's original number might be the closer number.
 
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StayOnTop

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What I first thought from your information was: 36% of osteopathic students matched AOA before the scramble + 43.4% of DOs matched ACGME = 79.4% total who matched pre-scramble, and then add 15% who later scrambled, plus 5.3% military for a total match rate of 99.7%. But 99.7% of osteopathic students matching is not a believable number considering MD schools are around 95%. 99.7% is a rounding error from 100%.

So I conclude that these percentages from Diane Burkhart include only DOs who matched at AOA, ACGME or military, and not DOs who didn't match at all. It's fudged like law school median salary reports.

So what is the actual match rate for DOs? I think the OP's original number might be the closer number.
Is that number for MD pre-scramble or post? I think having a near 100% match rate for DO students WHO participated in the match, post-scramble, isn't that far fetched, if nearly 1000 AOA positions are open pre-scramble, and 84% of AOA positions fill up overall.
 

MLT2MT2DO

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What I first thought from your information was: 36% of osteopathic students matched AOA before the scramble + 43.4% of DOs matched ACGME = 79.4% total who matched pre-scramble, and then add 15% who later scrambled, plus 5.3% military for a total match rate of 99.7%. But 99.7% of osteopathic students matching is not a believable number considering MD schools are around 95%. 99.7% is a rounding error from 100%.

So I conclude that these percentages from Diane Burkhart include only DOs who matched at AOA, ACGME or military, and not DOs who didn't match at all. It's fudged like law school median salary reports.

So what is the actual match rate for DOs? I think the OP's original number might be the closer number.

I'm more likely to believe the 99.7% than the "1 out of every 5 students don't match" statistic
 

Everglide

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DO student don't have a higher match rate than MD student, take that 99.7 with a grain of salt.
Given how many AOA spots go unfilled, it wouldn't surprise me if DOs actually do have a higher post-scramble fill rate
 

Parts Unknown

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What I first thought from your information was: 36% of osteopathic students matched AOA before the scramble + 43.4% of DOs matched ACGME = 79.4% total who matched pre-scramble, and then add 15% who later scrambled, plus 5.3% military for a total match rate of 99.7%. But 99.7% of osteopathic students matching is not a believable number considering MD schools are around 95%. 99.7% is a rounding error from 100%.

So I conclude that these percentages from Diane Burkhart include only DOs who matched at AOA, ACGME or military, and not DOs who didn't match at all. It's fudged like law school median salary reports.

So what is the actual match rate for DOs? I think the OP's original number might be the closer number.
If you are scrambling then you have, by definition, not matched.

Rounding the numbers above, for every 100 graduating students:
36 to AOA
44 to ACGME
5 to military
15 unmatched (later scrambled)

If you ignore the 5 who got sucked into the military, the match rate would be (36 + 44) / (36 + 44 + 15) = 80/95 = 84.2%.

That's my best guess, although there are other ways to play with the numbers.
 

FutureCTDoc

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The reason that so many go unmatched is that they go ACGME with AOA as a fallback. ACGME residencies tend to be better as they include University hospitals. Consider IM several of the best residencies are MGH, UW, Duke, Hopkins and almost all directly university affiliated programs are good. Many AOA are community based, which regardless of AOA or ACGME tends to be poorer as there are fewer high acuity patients, less qualified attendings, poorer fellowship opportunities and less ability to do research. Most people would rather go ACGME for University or University affiliates and use the AOA as a scramble as opposed to the almost certainty of matching into a middling community program.
 
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The reason that so many go unmatched is that they go ACGME with AOA as a fallback. ACGME residencies tend to be better as they include University hospitals. Consider IM several of the best residencies are MGH, UW, Duke, Hopkins and almost all directly university affiliated programs are good. Many AOA are community based, which regardless of AOA or ACGME tends to be poorer as there are fewer high acuity patients, less qualified attendings, poorer fellowship opportunities and less ability to do research. Most people would rather go ACGME for University or University affiliates and use the AOA as a scramble as opposed to the almost certainty of matching into a middling community program.

I think that is part of the reason, but I also think some people just don't match/scramble.

This is a good incentive to not be in the bottom of the barrel in your class and to do more than just pass your boards.
 

MLT2MT2DO

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Are certain specialties more inclined to give pre match offers than others?
Yes, it is normally the specialities/residencies that know they'll have a hard time getting quality applicants in the match. FP/Psych are the ones that I see most often throwing pre-matches, but to be fair these are the only "physician boards" I frequent.
 

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How successful are DO's in the ACGME match at top hospitals? Do they have to get higher boards on average? (I'm wondering if there is a bias among top hospitals). Please do not start a DO vs MD argument. I was just wondering how many DO's go to places like Northwestern McGraw, Vanderbilt, Pitt, Cleveland Clinic, Emory, etc. Also, does anyone know stats in regards to surgical residencies? I know DO's are, on average, more inclined to go into a primary care specialty.
 

cliquesh

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How successful are DO's in the ACGME match at top hospitals? Do they have to get higher boards on average? (I'm wondering if there is a bias among top hospitals). Please do not start a DO vs MD argument. I was just wondering how many DO's go to places like Northwestern McGraw, Vanderbilt, Pitt, Cleveland Clinic, Emory, etc. Also, does anyone know stats in regards to surgical residencies? I know DO's are, on average, more inclined to go into a primary care specialty.
It depends. It depends not only on the specific hospital, but also which department in that hospital. John's Hopkins, for instance, will take DOs for EM, Gas and IM. DOs are, in fact, currently chief residents in Hopkins' Gas and IM programs. However, you will not see DOs in Hopkins' ob/gyn or surgery residencies. This is true for almost all hospitals. You'll see DOs in certain departments but not others. So what you should do is go check out "current residents" at hospitals you are interested in and see if they take DOs or not.

For ACGME surgery, I doubt you will get a spot at a TOP hospital. It is possible to get a spot at a university program, however. You will need to take the USMLE and do quiet well to achieve this.
 

cliquesh

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How successful are DO's in the ACGME match at top hospitals? Do they have to get higher boards on average? (I'm wondering if there is a bias among top hospitals). Please do not start a DO vs MD argument. I was just wondering how many DO's go to places like Northwestern McGraw, Vanderbilt, Pitt, Cleveland Clinic, Emory, etc. Also, does anyone know stats in regards to surgical residencies? I know DO's are, on average, more inclined to go into a primary care specialty.
It depends. It depends not only on the specific hospital, but also which department in that hospital. John's Hopkins, for instance, will take DOs for EM, Gas and IM. DOs are, in fact, currently chief residents in Hopkins' Gas and IM programs. However, you will not see DOs in Hopkins' ob/gyn or surgery residencies. This is true for almost all hospitals. You'll see DOs in certain departments but not others. So what you should do is go check out "current residents" at hospitals you are interested in and see if they take DOs or not.

For ACGME surgery, I doubt you will get a spot at a TOP hospital. It is possible to get a spot at a university program, however. You will need to take the USMLE and do quiet well to achieve this.
 

Ignatius M.D.

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It depends. It depends not only on the specific hospital, but also which department in that hospital. John's Hopkins, for instance, will take DOs for EM, Gas and IM. DOs are, in fact, currently chief residents in Hopkins' Gas and IM programs. However, you will not see DOs in Hopkins' ob/gyn or surgery residencies. This is true for almost all hospitals. You'll see DOs in certain departments but not others. So what you should do is go check out "current residents" at hospitals you are interested in and see if they take DOs or not.

For ACGME surgery, I doubt you will get a spot at a TOP hospital. It is possible to get a spot at a university program, however. You will need to take the USMLE and do quiet well to achieve this.
Thank you. So, a DO could get into a university program, but would have to do better on USMLE on average? Or were you saying that anyone has to do well to land the a surgical residency period? I know average boards for gen. surgery are 220+.
 

cliquesh

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Thank you. So, a DO could get into a university program, but would have to do better on USMLE on average? Or were you saying that anyone has to do well to land the a surgical residency period? I know average boards for gen. surgery are 220+.
Sorry. When I said better than average, I was referring to ACGME surgery. You don't need to get a 250 or something, but you should really aim for a 230 if you want to do ACGME gen surgery. However, if you want ACGME ortho, NS, ENT, etc, you probably need to do significantly above average.

If you do go to a DO school and you still want to do surgery when you are done, the biggest problem you are going to face is that the AOA match is before the ACGME match. So you might find out you landed an AOA ortho spot and then you would have to decide if you want to give that spot up and gamble in the ACGME match.