studentofsdn

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Feb 28, 2014
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Resident interested in Pain fellowship, but also really enjoy Anesthesia. I'd like to do both if possible, but I've heard people say you eventually need to choose one since both are so different. I've come to terms with the fact that I will have to make this decision later b/c its too hard to make now. My question is though, after coming out of pain fellowship, are your anesthesia skills already atrophied? Or is it easy to go back into doing anesthesia part time (or even full time if it turns out i hate pain)? THanks
 

Tramadeezy

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They will atrophy a little but it comes right back. I would say to moonlight in anesthesia as a fellow if you can. Also studying for oral boards as a pain fellow keeps your anesthesia knowledge sharp.
 
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Agast

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Depends on which skills you're talking about.

I'm confident 6 years out I will still be able to intubate, mask ventilate, place arterial lines. I still pop in the occasional IV.

I do not remember induction doses. But that's easy to look up and re-familiarize if needed.
 
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pastafan

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I do not remember induction doses. But that's easy to look up and re-familiarize if needed.
All of the big syringe and half of the little syringe. It was stressful when we changed from Pentothal to propofol. Went from half of the big syringe to all of the big syringe...
 
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Ferrismonk

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I did weekend trauma call during my pain fellowship and a little after, but largely didn't do any anesthesia for 3 years afterwards. In my new job I do some anesthesia and while I was worried, it's actually not a big deal at all. Thing to remember is most places don't want the pain guy doing hearts/livers/etc anyway. Unless you love the complicated anesthesia (in which case you probably would be talking about a cardiac or peds fellowship anyway), you'll be just fine.
 

dipriMAN

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I moon lite as a pain fellow once a month, actually find it enjoyable to put the occasional tube in .... probably do it just as often as the new grad supervising CRNAs all day.

I’ve heard many years out it gets harder to get back into it.
 

Laryngospasm

Trench Dog
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I have a friend who’s been out almost 10 years. He’s basically said no way he would be able to go back.
 

Monterosso

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Resident interested in Pain fellowship, but also really enjoy Anesthesia. I'd like to do both if possible, but I've heard people say you eventually need to choose one since both are so different. I've come to terms with the fact that I will have to make this decision later b/c its too hard to make now. My question is though, after coming out of pain fellowship, are your anesthesia skills already atrophied? Or is it easy to go back into doing anesthesia part time (or even full time if it turns out i hate pain)? THanks
I'm a firm believer in maintaining anesthesia skills if you can (plus anesthesiology pays well, not infrequently more than pain). Moonlighting as a fellow is a good option. If moonlighting is not available during fellowship, another option is to moonlight / per diem shifts right before and after fellowship. There is often a month or so gap in between residency ending and fellowship starting, and sometimes a gap between fellowship ending and your attending job start date.
 
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