Mar 11, 2010
947
9
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Am I the only person who saw a disconnect in her integrity?

She is counseling end-of-life patients to let go, people who very well may have wanted to fight on.
 

armybound

urologist.
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Jan 1, 2007
4,777
397
281
Uranus
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Am I the only person who saw a disconnect in her integrity?

She is counseling end-of-life patients to let go, people who very well may have wanted to fight on.
I think that's ultimately the lesson to get from this article. You have to remember to put yourself in patients' shoes every once in a while to understand what they might want.
 
Aug 26, 2009
225
0
41
Status
Resident [Any Field]
should a doctor necessarily practice what he/she preaches?
 
May 27, 2009
4,020
5
41
Status
Medical Student
If you haven't already, I recommend reading Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality by Pauline Chen. It helped me realize that there is a very blurred line between exhausting all treatment options and accepting that as humans, we are impermanent. The book definitely makes you look at medicine and your motives for it differently.

End-of-life care in the US still has a long way to go in terms of providing patients adequate resources and the emotional support that they need, so good for you for being interested in it.
 

lord_jeebus

和魂洋才
Moderator
15+ Year Member
Jul 12, 2003
5,823
166
481
GMT+9
Status
Attending Physician
Am I the only person who saw a disconnect in her integrity?

She is counseling end-of-life patients to let go, people who very well may have wanted to fight on.
The role of a palliative care physician is not to convince people to "let go" but to put that option on the table, let the patient decide, and provide resources to ease suffering regardless of what the patient chooses. She was free to choose aggressive therapy, as are any of her patients.

I think the article is written to make people see that kind of disconnect, but I don't think it's there.
 
Mar 11, 2010
947
9
0
Status
Pre-Medical
The role of a palliative care physician is not to convince people to "let go" but to put that option on the table, let the patient decide, and provide resources to ease suffering regardless of what the patient chooses. She was free to choose aggressive therapy, as are any of her patients.

I think the article is written to make people see that kind of disconnect, but I don't think it's there.
I see. Thanks for the clarification.

In a part of the article, the writer suggests the self-conflict and contradiction the physician had, given her own personal choice versus what she had to do in her job. If her patient voluntarily decided to choose the palliative option, I can't see why she should feel conflicted. But that's just the way I roll, I guess.
 

devilpup

10+ Year Member
Jan 22, 2006
324
9
251
CA
restlessmd.blogspot.com
Status
Attending Physician
The role of a palliative care physician is not to convince people to "let go" but to put that option on the table, let the patient decide, and provide resources to ease suffering regardless of what the patient chooses. She was free to choose aggressive therapy, as are any of her patients.
Ditto.

In regards to putting options on the table and letting patients decide, why are we still putting physician-assisted suicide off the table in most States?

Physician-Assisted Suicide or Palliative care- why not both...
 

LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
10+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2005
22,401
29,392
281
Status
Academic Administration
I felt sad knowing that she had such miserable final days due to her refusal to accept the cards dealt her... but 40 is so very young so I can see her desire to fight and fight.

What astonished me about this story was the fact that she was diagnosed abroad in a country with a much different culture (her husband was working there and she went to visit and got a medical check-up in order to apply for a visa to extend her visit) and so it was her husband who was provided the information and who relayed treatment decisions to the doctors who were caring for her. She liked this so much that she insisted that her doctors in the States operate in the same manner. Her husband (who it seems was in finance, not medicine) would tell her only what she needed to know to make the decision immediately before them. It seems very odd. I wonder how much of what was wrong with her was downplayed and if she really had incomplete information on type, stage and prognosis.

It is an article that is very much worth your time.
 
Dec 15, 2010
139
0
0
Texas
Status
Pre-Medical
thanks for the article. i def have a new perspective of death and dying, from both the patient perspective and the physician perspective.