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Pancreatic somatostatin

Discussion in 'MCAT Study Question Q&A' started by gabdolce, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. gabdolce

    5+ Year Member

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    Hi all,

    What exactly is the stimulus for pancreatic somatostatin stimulation? Kaplan is telling me in one instance that high glucose AND high AA induces somatostatin and another instance tells me high glucose OR high AA induces somatostatin.

    Either way, these situations seem dubious because that means that insulin would never be working -- somatostatin would always be around whenever the situations suggest insulin should be around, which means insulin is always shut off (by somatostatin).

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. dancerdoc89

    dancerdoc89 Knowledge is Power

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    Hmmm, I'll give it a shot...

    High glucose should cause somatostatin to be secreted; one major inhibitory function of somatostatin is to inhibit growth hormone (GH). GH acts to increase glucose levels in the blood...if glucose is too high, GH needs to be shut off, and somatostatin does this.

    As for AA (I'm assuming "amino acids"), I don't see the relationship between it and somatostatin (maybe I just don't know!). Does somatostatin inhibit a process that break down pepides/proteins into AA?

    I hope it helped somewhat...I'm trying to make this a learning process for both of us here...:luck:
     
  4. gabdolce

    5+ Year Member

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    But somatostatin inhibits the activity of both glucagon and insulin, no? Isn't this then paradoxical? If high glucose activates both insulin and somatostatin, and somatostatin turns insulin off, won't we always have high glucose and thus, always have high somatostatin?
     

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