irs88

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thanks everyone
 
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TriagePreMed

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Great, another thread about a kid with mommy and daddy issues.

How about instead you grow up and don't prove them anything? Their problem they don't believe, not yours. If I become a DO and a patient comes to me and rejects me for my DO degree, I'll probably be extra happy because he'll get treated by some intern, I'll have more free time, and hopefully that patient will be darwined.
 
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Look up a DO school's residency match. I was looking at Touro's match list and I saw students matching in various fields (Anas, Surgery, Family, Pediatrics, etc) at UCI, UCLA, UCSF, Stanford, Loma Linda, UTSW, USC, etc. If you live on a different coast look up a DO school on that coast, I'm sure the students also matched into comparable programs but at a closer program, which is probably more familiar to your parents, though most people have heard of UCLA, Stanford, and USC.
 

wook

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I actually talked to a DO Pediatric Pulmonologist at Kaiser before I applied.

Off the top of my head some "famous" DOs are:

-Chief of Space Medicine at NASA: http://spacemed.jsc.nasa.gov/
-Dr. Kirby (a well known DO Dermatologist who went to NSU)
-There was a DO on time magazine's cover because of his work at 9/11 (he was credited as an MD on the cover though).
-Several members of the Texas Medical Board are DOs. http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/boards/mbbios.php

Not really famous, but the Director of Travel and Vaccinations in Texas where I grew up was a DO and my DO LOR is the Assistant Residency Director at a relatively large hospital.

Also several public institutions have DO schools: University of North Texas, Michigan State University (MD and DO students take some classes together), West Virginia, OSU, OU, UMDNJ. VCOM is affiliated with Virginia Tech.

And there are also DO board directors at some prestigious universities (can't accurately recall, so I'll let you look it up).
 

wolverinepwns

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Show them a recent residency match list for one of the DO schools!
 

Phlame217

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:troll:
 
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Tell them to take a poll: would you rather be treated by a doctor that was trained in the united states, or one that was trained in grenada?


personally, id rather be treated by a doctor that wasnt afraid to make his/her own decisions....
 
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Come on OP... Unless your parents are paying your tuition, I'd tell them to keep their ill informed opinion regarding osteopaths to themselves. "Thanks Mom & Dad, but I did some research and really think that an osteopathic medical education would be the best starting point for my future career as a physician." Sometimes you have to make your own path, and in the end they may be persuaded by your success as a physician. Honestly your indecision and lack of fortitude regarding something that should be important to you, is the most worrisome aspect of your dilemma. If you need to receive approval to feel good about a decision, medicine may not be right for you.

My best advice is to take them to an open house. After visiting PCOM's open house with my father (allopath from a top 20 school) he was convinced that I would receive more hands-on clinical preparation than allopathics schools would afford me. He now believes that the DO route is superior, if one is trying to work in the field of primary care. Which I am, so he supports my decision 100%.
 
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Great, another thread about a kid with mommy and daddy issues.

How about instead you grow up and don't prove them anything? Their problem they don't believe, not yours. If I become a DO and a patient comes to me and rejects me for my DO degree, I'll probably be extra happy because he'll get treated by some intern, I'll have more free time, and hopefully that patient will be darwined.


How come you always talk down to people? I am new here and even I can see every post you have is rude and condescending. Whether it is about URM candidates, people asking for advice, interview questions you are always inconsiderate and you jump to conclusions. Don't bother replying to me. I am just calling you out as I am sure other people will in the future. It is called class and you don't get it by paying tuition.



As for the MD vs DO perception, my father is an allopathic and very excited I was accepted into an osteopathic program. I have uncles, and cousins who are both allopathics and osteopathics with everyone being very supportive. In fact the institue of practice my father works in is comprised of about 1/3 osteopathic physicians and the care is world class.

They also assured me that an osteopathic school in the USA is a much better idea than going over seas.
 

ProtossCarrier

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How come you always talk down to people? I am new here and even I can see every post you have is rude and condescending. Whether it is about URM candidates, people asking for advice, interview questions you are always inconsiderate and you jump to conclusions. Don't bother replying to me. I am just calling you out as I am sure other people will in the future. It is called class and you don't get it by paying tuition.



As for the MD vs DO perception, my father is an allopathic and very excited I was accepted into an osteopathic program. I have uncles, and cousins who are both allopathics and osteopathics with everyone being very supportive. In fact the institue of practice my father works in is comprised of about 1/3 osteopathic physicians and the care is world class.

They also assured me that an osteopathic school in the USA is a much better idea than going over seas.
you mean he's an MD? "allopathic" is a derogatory remark.
 

JaggerPlate

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Is it? Not any more than osteopathic. I don't allow labels to demean me. I was just using the term as a basis to compare schools of thought.
Carrier has brought this up a few times ... apparently he is personally offended by it, but, as someone pointed out before, institutions such the AAMC use the term themselves ... so. Shrug. No offense to Carrier or anything, I'm just not sure how widely held this believe is.
 

drctother

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OP: Honestly I wouldn't care the least bit about my parents. I love them blah blah but its MY CHOICE AND MY LIFE. What ever happened to the typical good parent going "I will support you son/daughter no matter what you do". If they chose to be unsupportive well so be it. When they see you are a successful doctor, and your initials mean nothing than you can turn to them and tell them "i told u so".

Remember at the end of the day, its YOUR life an YOUR choices. YOU made the choices to get through university and get decent stats. YOU are the one out volunteering your time to the community (i hope and assume). As pre-meds most of us sacrifice so much to get that UGrad degree with a solid resume (some more than others, i enjoy a cold beverage or two or eight from time to time) all to take the next step. You earned your choice you know? I bet i sound like preacher at this point lol

Good luck whatever you do, but its your choice
 

QofQuimica

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Can someone help me out here? Give me a credible website that can show them they are wrong? If not, who can we talk to for them to see its wrong? Official salary reports of DOs vs. MDs? Patient preference surveys that are "official". I dont know how to convince them..
Four years from now when they can tell all their friends, "My son/daughter is a doctor," they'll definitely be convinced. ;)

All kidding aside, OP, there is no significant functional difference between the job that a DO does versus what an MD does. They work together in the same hospitals, and commonly enter the same residency programs. I'm at an allo school, and we have DOs teaching us alongside of MDs. When I have rotated on different services or worked in outpatient offices, the only way I knew whether the preceptor/attending was a DO versus an MD is if I looked at his or her ID tag. My dad and brother in law are both DOs, and they are excellent physicians who are very well-liked by their patients. My dad's career spanned forty years, and there was never even a single incident where a patient didn't want to go to him because he is a DO.

Going to the Caribbean is an extremely risky gamble. Getting into residency is astronomically harder for a Caribbean student compared to American students (MD or DO). Those odds are going to get even worse for IMGs as new med schools continue to open in the US, and established schools continue to expand their class size. By the time you graduate, IMGs will be competing with the largest number of American grads in the history of medical education for a relatively unchanged number of residency slots. You are much better off going through the match as a DO grad, especially since DOs have their own match.

Ultimately, I think you reach a point where you have to thank your parents for their concern, but explain to them that their doctor friends are likely not very familiar with the "brave new world" that is now medical school admissions and training. The whole process is a lot more competitive now than it was even ten years ago, let alone a few decades ago when your parents' friends were applying for med school and residency, and as I said above, this trend is only going to continue. You are making the right decision to apply to DO schools rather than Caribbean schools.

Best of luck to you with your apps. :)
 
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I know exactly how you feel. Others in this thread can be condescending and tell you to man up all they want, but I don't think they could possibly understand if they are not in the same position. A few months back, I posted basically the exact same thing here:
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=762411

At the time, I was totally distraught, and had no idea how to reconcile what my dad thought with what I knew was best for me. I decided to just do what I knew was best, and hopefully my dad would come around. I sent him a few match lists, and even put him in touch with the DO that I got my letter of recommendation from. But the biggest thing, was that I told him what I wanted (to be a doctor) and that I wasn't willing to wait, spend thousands on an MCAT class to MAYBE do better the 3rd time, and to spend a ton of money AGAIN reapplying to allopathic schools, just to maybe not even get in again, who knows? It was the first time I had ever gone against what he thought, as I really value his opinion, and up until now, he has been pretty good about knowing what's best for me. I started the application process and did more research on the different schools I was interested in. I started getting super excited about them, and would call my mom talking about all of the cool things I was learning and what each school had to offer. I think my dad got upset that he was no longer in the loop, and he finally decided to look at some of the stuff I had sent him, as well as open his mind to the DO route. Recently, my dad called me suggesting a DO school for me to apply to, saying he just started mentoring students from there (he is a radiologist) and that they are brilliant, and that he is really impressed with whatever they are doing there to produce such amazing students. He is now totally on board with the idea, and has even helped me edit some essays.

Moral of the story: Know what is best for you, and tell your parents that. You can send them the data, but if they are so blindsided by whatever they think to see the facts, then there is no use. If you are adamant and really show them that this is what you want, and what is going to make you happy, I promise you that they will come around. My dad is one of the most stubborn people I have ever met, and he came around pretty fast. Do your research, and know what you want. Most of the time parents just want the best for their children, and because of their lack of knowledge, they think that the best is an MD. It might take some time for them to start looking at the information that you have compiled for them, but once they see that you are serious about this, I think they will come around.
 
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Dr Oops

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Your parents wont care what data you have. Once you start they'll accept it.

What you can do is tell them that patients dont even know when theyre seeing a nurse vs a physician half the time as long as the person wears a long white coat.

The reason theres less D.O.s at places is because there are simply less of them.

Throw out a bunch of acronyms at them. Like ACGME etc., the more the better. They most likely wont know any of them and realize they dont what theyre talking about.
 

TriagePreMed

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How come you always talk down to people? I am new here and even I can see every post you have is rude and condescending. Whether it is about URM candidates, people asking for advice, interview questions you are always inconsiderate and you jump to conclusions. Don't bother replying to me. I am just calling you out as I am sure other people will in the future. It is called class and you don't get it by paying tuition.
The internet has made me a bitter person, but in regards to the URM, I spoke it like it is.
 

PunkmedGirl

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I side with Phame....stop feeding the troll.:cool:
 

TriagePreMed

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You spoke like somebody who feels they are owed, but noone owes you anything. All you deserve is what you can kill and drag home on your own.
We'll degenerate the thread hopefully for just a second, but no, I don't feel anyone owes me anything. I don't think that's the general vibe of pro-URM people. If you see the thread, most people support it because it will give better representation to minorities AND because they believe there are true health benefits for communities in having minority doctors. Trust me, even as URM, I still am having to kill and drag home, and no, nobody owes me anything; however, that doesn't mean I don't believe in the benefits of recruiting URM and disadvantaged students.
 
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The internet has made me a bitter person, but in regards to the URM, I spoke it like it is.
Sigh. Why? Look, the mission of medical school isn't to accept the highest gpa/mcat combos - it's to improve the health of the community (try reading their mission statements). They do and should give preference to people who are more likely to stay a d practice there as has been supported by research. The same has been true of white students coming from the ghetto (there are just fewer of them and not as easy to point to). Sorry to derail the thread but I'm tired of going to interviews and people assuming crap.
 

TriagePreMed

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Sigh. Why? Look, the mission of medical school isn't to accept the highest gpa/mcat combos - it's to improve the health of the community (try reading their mission statements). They do and should give preference to people who are more likely to stay a d practice there as has been supported by research. The same has been true of white students coming from the ghetto (there are just fewer of them and not as easy to point to). Sorry to derail the thread but I'm tired of going to interviews and people assuming crap.
Seems you're confused. I'm on your side of the debate.
 

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Carrier has brought this up a few times ... apparently he is personally offended by it, but, as someone pointed out before, institutions such the AAMC use the term themselves ... so. Shrug. No offense to Carrier or anything, I'm just not sure how widely held this believe is.
Here is a quote from annals of internal medicine regarding this issue. Just because something is widely used does not mean it's right. I wonder if you would just shrug when someone call you an osteopath.

Allopathic medicine has historically been defined as ordinary medicine [7]. It was, in fact, a term first coined by Samuel Hahnemann, founder of homeopathy [10, 11]. Politically, Hahnemann thus positioned “regular” physicians as merely one type of doctor representing only a single doctrine who practiced curing with agents that produced symptoms or conditions opposite to those of the disease being treated [10-13]. This practice was in sharp contrast to that of homeopaths, who used small doses of agents to produce symptoms similar to those of the disease being treated (a “like cures like” model). This practice was based on the observations of John Hunter, an 18th-century Scottish surgeon [14]. (Hunter hypothesized that an organism cannot be diseased in two ways simultaneously. If a body cannot have two simultaneous fevers, it follows that one illness can drive out the other.) In contrast to “allopathic” practitioners, followers of homeopathy use small doses of preparations based on provings, the results of Hahnemann's experiments on himself and his family, that in higher doses would recreate symptoms similar to those of the patient [10, 11]. The term allopathy, however, is not applicable to the modern practice of “nonhomeopathic” medicine. Whole drug classes, such as antibiotics, do not act in the manner of “opposites.” Furthermore, the botanical schools of the 19th century used allopathy as a disagreeable term of contrast. They claimed the captured warmth and life-sustaining properties of the botanicals that they administered, whereas allopathy carried all of the derogatory implications associated with its use of cold minerals from the dark earth (such as mercurial agents) [10, 15, 16]. This, too, has now lost its applicability in a world that uses agents created by bioengineers and genetic manipulation.
 

painmd87

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Two stories on parental disapproval:

My boss (an MD subspecialist) was "hysterical" (her words) when her daughter said she wanted to apply DO. Then she learned about them. Her daughter took a spot in a DO school that focuses on primary care over an MD school that turns out a lot of specialists.

My father (an MD subspecialist) wasn't too keen on DOs, and his brother had gotten an MD from Guadalejara. Then he learned about them, and had some rotate through his hospital as med students. Now he has two DO residents in each class and a DO fellow.

Some people will never come around to accepting DOs. I've generally found that people who are willing to listen and learn will probably find a reasonable answer.

Not everyone is, though.
 

Cboseak1

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My family doc I've been going to all my life is a DO I've never even noticed a difference and neither has any one else. He's a great doctor.
 

JaggerPlate

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Here is a quote from annals of internal medicine regarding this issue. Just because something is widely used does not mean it's right. I wonder if you would just shrug when someone call you an osteopath.

Allopathic medicine has historically been defined as ordinary medicine [7]. It was, in fact, a term first coined by Samuel Hahnemann, founder of homeopathy [10, 11]. Politically, Hahnemann thus positioned “regular” physicians as merely one type of doctor representing only a single doctrine who practiced curing with agents that produced symptoms or conditions opposite to those of the disease being treated [10-13]. This practice was in sharp contrast to that of homeopaths, who used small doses of agents to produce symptoms similar to those of the disease being treated (a “like cures like” model). This practice was based on the observations of John Hunter, an 18th-century Scottish surgeon [14]. (Hunter hypothesized that an organism cannot be diseased in two ways simultaneously. If a body cannot have two simultaneous fevers, it follows that one illness can drive out the other.) In contrast to “allopathic” practitioners, followers of homeopathy use small doses of preparations based on provings, the results of Hahnemann's experiments on himself and his family, that in higher doses would recreate symptoms similar to those of the patient [10, 11]. The term allopathy, however, is not applicable to the modern practice of “nonhomeopathic” medicine. Whole drug classes, such as antibiotics, do not act in the manner of “opposites.” Furthermore, the botanical schools of the 19th century used allopathy as a disagreeable term of contrast. They claimed the captured warmth and life-sustaining properties of the botanicals that they administered, whereas allopathy carried all of the derogatory implications associated with its use of cold minerals from the dark earth (such as mercurial agents) [10, 15, 16]. This, too, has now lost its applicability in a world that uses agents created by bioengineers and genetic manipulation.

1. I probably would just try to correct the situation and if it wasn't working, I would just shrug.

2. I'm sorry you don't like the term Allopathic, but it seems to be pretty well accepted, even within the organizations that represent your education. For example, the ACGME, AAMC, and even the entire section on SDN refers to MD education in the US as Allopathic. Similarly, the AOA, AACOM, and SDN all refer to DO training as Osteopathic. However, these individuals/bodies don't refer to it as Osteopathy, or DOs as Osteopaths. Honestly, if you have a beef ... take it up with the ACGME, AAMC, higher ups here, etc. However, I really feel like your claims are going to fall on deaf ears.
 

munchymanRX

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Hey guys,

my parents are pretty well educated and by talking to their doctor friends they have come to the conclusion that DO schools are mostly alternative medicine and 2ndry doctors. That I must go to the carribeans because the DO schools are not good.

I have no idea how to show them they are wrong. I tell them they get paid the same amount, but they say back, "if a patient comes into a hosptial, they would never choose a DO doctor." They would always choose a MD. "Most of them don't work in good places like Kaiser."

This is really annoying me and I need to show them some proof. This has to be something legitimate that they will believe in. They say that there aren't that many DO doctors in Kaiser Permanante, so you will not get in. Its better to go through the Caribbeans.

Thanks guys.


I won't play into the usual DO vs. MD debate because there isn't a whole lot to say. Both degrees grant equal practice rights and equal pay. As far as professional prestige and respect, that's largely a function of how competent a physician you are and not what degree you earned. The educations are nearly identical and the vast majority of physicians, whether MD or DO will say the same thing.

Anyhow, as far as Kaiser is concerned, I'm not sure where you're getting the impression that it's necessarily a "good" place to work. It might be attractive for some doctors, but like everything in life it goes deeper than just having the requisite notoriety to be desirable. True, Kaiser provides a relatively normal work schedule and removes much of the stress of disastrous malpractice suits, but what you get in security you pay for in freedom. Your income is fixed, rather than being a function of what you yourself put in, and you won't always have free range to do what you want in terms of patient care. You'll have to refer to someone else for a simple procedure that you could easily do yourself in private practice, for instance.

That being said, Kaiser and other HMO's are attractive to many physicians because let's face it, running your own business and caring for patients concurrently ain't easy. Many docs just opt to go to work for a place where the administrative work is handled for them, and that's perfectly understandable-especially if one has a family or just wants a lower-stress lifestyle.

Troll or not, your parents do not sound very educated about the medical education process and you wouldn't be doing yourself any favors by letting them make big decisions like this for you. Try to help them understand.

Also, Kaiser hires PLENTY of DOs. (see links in an above post)
 

drctother

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I won't play into the usual DO vs. MD debate because there isn't a whole lot to say. Both degrees grant equal practice rights and equal pay. As far as professional prestige and respect, that's largely a function of how competent a physician you are and not what degree you earned. The educations are nearly identical and the vast majority of physicians, whether MD or DO will say the same thing.

Anyhow, as far as Kaiser is concerned, I'm not sure where you're getting the impression that it's necessarily a "good" place to work. It might be attractive for some doctors, but like everything in life it goes deeper than just having the requisite notoriety to be desirable. True, Kaiser provides a relatively normal work schedule and removes much of the stress of disastrous malpractice suits, but what you get in security you pay for in freedom. Your income is fixed, rather than being a function of what you yourself put in, and you won't always have free range to do what you want in terms of patient care. You'll have to refer to someone else for a simple procedure that you could easily do yourself in private practice, for instance.

That being said, Kaiser and other HMO's are attractive to many physicians because let's face it, running your own business and caring for patients concurrently ain't easy. Many docs just opt to go to work for a place where the administrative work is handled for them, and that's perfectly understandable-especially if one has a family or just wants a lower-stress lifestyle.

Troll or not, your parents do not sound very educated about the medical education process and you wouldn't be doing yourself any favors by letting them make big decisions like this for you. Try to help them understand.

Also, Kaiser hires PLENTY of DOs. (see links in an above post)
You should be a lawyer lol best advice/argument on this thread yet. Better than mine included:laugh:

But ya thats actually impressive as a pre-med you know that
 

painmd87

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LOL What?
I'm not sure what part wasn't clear.

She wants to practice primary care and chose a DO school that focuses on teaching those methods rather than an MD school that doesn't do a great job with primary care but does turn out a lot of specialists.

Clear?
 
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irs88

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first of all, Im not trolling. The reason why I want to help them understand and get on my side and their "approval" is because they really helped me out in paying my undergrad bills and they place their self-value on my success. I dont want them to think it was a waste and feel disappointed.

I showed them the data, the pay, the FAQ page on this website. I told them at the orientations, even the Caribbean representatives suggested DO, and that every person on the internet said it. Most importantly, I agree with everything you guys said. I know they are exactly the same. I also said their sources are misinformed.

Its just that it wont get through their head. They made up their mind and are not changing it. All I can do is keep hammering more and more data. They laugh when I even mention my interest in DO despite all of the data. Its just frustrating.

I of course can make my own decision, but I would hate living everyday knowing all my parents think of me is an alternative doctor, even though its based on no actual proof. I would hate myself if they get disappointed in me and worse, disappointed in themselves.

So I will keep showing them data, and see where it goes...
 

PunkmedGirl

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first of all, Im not trolling. The reason why I want to help them understand and get on my side and their "approval" is because they really helped me out in paying my undergrad bills and they place their self-value on my success. I dont want them to think it was a waste and feel disappointed.

I showed them the data, the pay, the FAQ page on this website. I told them at the orientations, even the Caribbean representatives suggested DO, and that every person on the internet said it. Most importantly, I agree with everything you guys said. I know they are exactly the same. I also said their sources are misinformed.

Its just that it wont get through their head. They made up their mind and are not changing it. All I can do is keep hammering more and more data. They laugh when I even mention my interest in DO despite all of the data. Its just frustrating.

I of course can make my own decision, but I would hate living everyday knowing all my parents think of me is an alternative doctor, even though its based on no actual proof. I would hate myself if they get disappointed in me and worse, disappointed in themselves.

So I will keep showing them data, and see where it goes...

So what happens if they don't come around? Are you going to abandon the opportunity of going to a DO school because of what your parents will think of you? I understand that you parents have been there for you and supported you through school, but guess what, that's what parents are SUPPOSE to do. They've raised you and now its time for you to put some grown man/woman pants on and make some decisions about YOUR life without worrying about what THEY will think of it.
 

JaggerPlate

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first of all, Im not trolling. The reason why I want to help them understand and get on my side and their "approval" is because they really helped me out in paying my undergrad bills and they place their self-value on my success. I dont want them to think it was a waste and feel disappointed.

I showed them the data, the pay, the FAQ page on this website. I told them at the orientations, even the Caribbean representatives suggested DO, and that every person on the internet said it. Most importantly, I agree with everything you guys said. I know they are exactly the same. I also said their sources are misinformed.

Its just that it wont get through their head. They made up their mind and are not changing it. All I can do is keep hammering more and more data. They laugh when I even mention my interest in DO despite all of the data. Its just frustrating.

I of course can make my own decision, but I would hate living everyday knowing all my parents think of me is an alternative doctor, even though its based on no actual proof. I would hate myself if they get disappointed in me and worse, disappointed in themselves.

So I will keep showing them data, and see where it goes...
I get what you're saying and I think some people here are brushing off the parental relationship too quickly. Like you're saying, I'm sure they are important to your life, and you want to 'make em proud,' not do anything to put strain on your relationship with them, etc.

Having said that though ... keep a few things in mind:

1. They are wrong
2. You do need to put your own wellbeing and success ahead of your relationship with them. Sounds harsh, but it's 100% true (namely because they are wrong).
3. I'm 99% sure they will come around

Honestly, I think the easiest thing you can do is just keep showing them the high profile, successful DOs - James Polk, DO - the chief of space medicine at NASA who helped save the Chilean miners, the 'Hero MD' DO, people in the media like Will Kirby, etc, etc. Also, you could REALLY gain some leverage if you find out that one of their docs is a DO and they never even knew it. Not sure how great a probability this is, but it would really kind of close that argument.
 

Cheshyre

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1. I probably would just try to correct the situation and if it wasn't working, I would just shrug.
God, that guy is hilarious. Starcraft addict MD student with nothing better to do with what precious little free time they have except to troll the DO forums.

They're gonna have some legendary bedside manner.
 

Bacchus

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Or DO student going to one of the top DO schools...ya know.
 

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God, that guy is hilarious. Starcraft addict MD student with nothing better to do with what precious little free time they have except to troll the DO forums.

They're gonna have some legendary bedside manner.
I am definitely a manner guy, by trolling the board and ask to not have MDs referred as allopath.
 
Aug 5, 2010
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I'm not sure what part wasn't clear.

She wants to practice primary care and chose a DO school that focuses on teaching those methods rather than an MD school that doesn't do a great job with primary care but does turn out a lot of specialists.

Clear?
Oh, it was clear the first time. It's just a very stupid reason. If you know 100% that you want to do primary care, the only difference between the two schools would be that the MD specialist school will likely allow you to do your primary care residency anywhere, from rural community program to high powered academic program.

I don't even know what 'teaching those techniques' means. You mean the elective rotations are better for FM? Somehow I doubt it. Which school was this?


Obviously, if you believe in OMM and things like that, it makes a lot of sense and you should certainly go DO.
 
Oct 17, 2010
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Oh, it was clear the first time. It's just a very stupid reason. If you know 100% that you want to do primary care, the only difference between the two schools would be that the MD specialist school will likely allow you to do your primary care residency anywhere, from rural community program to high powered academic program.

I don't even know what 'teaching those techniques' means. You mean the elective rotations are better for FM? Somehow I doubt it. Which school was this?


Obviously, if you believe in OMM and things like that, it makes a lot of sense and you should certainly go DO.
Its actually well known that many DO schools are better at preparing primary care physicians than highly ranked MD schools.. The whole person philosophy of osteopathic medicine usually is the difference maker... Would you rather a doctor keep you from getting sick through preventative medicine and treat the cause of your symptoms, or would you rather your doctor just make your symptoms go away?
 

csmittyB

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Its actually well known that many DO schools are better at preparing primary care physicians than highly ranked MD schools.. The whole person philosophy of osteopathic medicine usually is the difference maker... Would you rather a doctor keep you from getting sick through preventative medicine and treat the cause of your symptoms, or would you rather your doctor just make your symptoms go away?
You've got an acceptance. You can put the "DO treats the whole patient not just the symptoms" kool-aid down.
 
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Its actually well known that many DO schools are better at preparing primary care physicians than highly ranked MD schools.. The whole person philosophy of osteopathic medicine usually is the difference maker... Would you rather a doctor keep you from getting sick through preventative medicine and treat the cause of your symptoms, or would you rather your doctor just make your symptoms go away?
Um...seriously? I know that's what you said at the interview but....really?
 

JaggerPlate

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I am definitely a manner guy, by trolling the board and ask to not have MDs referred as allopath.
No one here said the word allopath ... they simply used the widely accepted terms allopathic and osteopathic to describe the two types of medical schools in the US.
 
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OP, I know when my mom heard that I was applying to DO schools she told my brother, "Tell him he can't apply there... They are fake doctors..." (we don't talk, hence why she told my brother and not me.)

My good friend and his wife: So, we can't find any good doctor's in this city (they just moved to Philly), all they have are DO's... It took us about 30 minutes to find a real doctor (implying MD).

My PI: So, when do you hear if you get a "real" acceptance? (implying MD programs I interviewed at.)


So, yes, there is a lot of misinformation out there and people who might not understand what a DO is, but you can only educate them to the fact that DO's are physicians just like MD's, it's just a slightly different path. With increasing competitiveness of applicants and an increasing number of applicants I think you will begin to see a large increase in the overall stats of entering DO classes, and as DO schools continue to expand you will see quite a few more DO physicians hitting the market. This means more DO's hitting the mainstream knowledge base. As it stands now DO's comprise a very small number of practicing physicians, so it shouldn't be surprising that not many people know what they are, especially when an MD has been synonymous with a physician for so many years...

In the end, the choice is yours and you will be the one who needs to live with it, not your parents.
 
Oct 17, 2010
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You've got an acceptance. You can put the "DO treats the whole patient not just the symptoms" kool-aid down.
actually its something I truly believe due to my interactions with DOs... My orthopedic surgeon (a DO) made a house call to my house when my brother may have broken his arm and had a wrestling tournament the next day... SORRY I don't know many MD's who make house calls anymore...
 

Dr Oops

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I am definitely a manner guy, by trolling the board and ask to not have MDs referred as allopath.
M.D.s haven't cared about being Called allopaths for ~ 20 yrs now as nearly all the citations from the article you posted are that old. In addition the term is used mostly by people in the healthcare field when differentiating between osteopathic colleges. Or does it offend you to consider MDs colleagues too?

If you called me an osteopath l would not be offended, merely say the term is inaccurate (osteopaths in other places have omm training but not physician education)

On a larger note l find it ridiculous that there all this bickering amongst ourselves when we have much bigger problems from non-physician groups
 
Aug 5, 2010
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actually its something I truly believe due to my interactions with DOs... My orthopedic surgeon (a DO) made a house call to my house when my brother may have broken his arm and had a wrestling tournament the next day... SORRY I don't know many MD's who make house calls anymore...
Your n=1 amuses me.

Also based on your logic, they teach you to make house calls at DO schools but discourage such empathy at MD schools?