1. The SDN iPhone App is back and free through November! Get it today and please post a review on the App Store!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice

Paying Back Loans After Med School

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by zubirix2k, Mar 31, 2004.

  1. zubirix2k

    zubirix2k Junior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2004
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    I guess these questions are directed to those of you already out of med school and in your residencies or jobs.

    First, after you are done with med-school how manageable is your pay back on the loans?

    Second, I have heard that there may be residency programs or hospitals that will pay back some of your loans or all of them if you do their residency program or work for them for a certain amount of time. Is there any truth to this?

    Third, What are your general experiences with loan repayment after medical school?

    Any input would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Vincristine

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2004
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    0
    You may not may not reach many of those people in this forum. Our friendly moderator might move it to someplace better, though.


    Yes, there is truth to this. Our IM residency pays something like $30k toward your loans once you've spent 3 years here. I think this is on the same line that it's also one of the highest paying IM residencies in an effort to attract more poeple (they have marginal success with this). I don't know how many other programs do it. Since I know the IM program here isn't of the greatest calibur, I would have to assume that of other schools with the same practice.

    Well, they send you a bill, and you send them money.... In all honesty, if you are thinking you will have problems making the minimum payments, you have two major options. One is to get your payments graded to your income such that you will likly be paying back much less in the first 5 or so years after graduation than later on. Second option is to consolidate as most consolidations have an extended repayment plan, with many up to 20 years. This cuts your monthly payment in half, but means you'll pay rediculous amounts in interest by the time you are done. However, you can always consolidate, pay the minimum for a while, and then begin sending them more money when you're able to. I've not see any consolidation programs that have early repayment penalties, but it's always something to confirm before signing on the dotted line.

    I guess your question seems awfully vague to me, so you may want to tell us what specifically you are concerned about or more about your situation.
     

Share This Page