Dismiss Notice
Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.

Perhaps a ray of hope?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by Jasminegab, Mar 24, 2004.

  1. Jasminegab

    Jasminegab psych student
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    0
    My concern isn't about GPA or MCAT scores. My concern is being rejected from medical school on account of past issues in my life. I have called the schools of my choice and spoken with Adcoms concerning my past issues and was told that my application would not be tossed in the trash. Yet, deep down inside I feel like this is something that everyone would say since discrimination is illegal. It's like calling a job and asking would they turn me down for past mistakes. Of course they would say "No" over the phone, but once you send in your application, they simply can overlook you.

    When I apply to medical school, I want adcoms to see that I had past issues, yet I have done much work to overcome my shortcomings. I'm not sure about doing a post-bac because I believe that only time will prove that my past is just that, my past. I want Adcoms to see that despite my past, I have graduate from undergaduate school with a 3.5 GPA and (when that time comes) went on to a MBS program and did pretty well on the MCAT. I also have experience in the medical field. I'm a registered medical assistant who has worked in the OR, physician office and even managed a physician office. I have worked as a Peer educator for student on health issues. I worked with Nurses, Nurse Practioners, Physicians Assistants and physicians.

    I understand that I have a past that can't be kept in the closet. I'm braned for life. It will follow me no matter how much good I do. However, what can I do to not let my past shame me for life?
    Perhaps this is not the place to ask this question. I just felt I need to talk about it in hopes that someone out there can relate and offer words of encouragement. Or, perhaps I'm just fooling myself and should think about another career. That's all for now.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. pathstudent

    pathstudent Sound Kapital
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    2,973
    Likes Received:
    67
    Status:
    Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    so what'd you do???
     
  4. Gauss

    Gauss Damnit Jim!
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2002
    Messages:
    1,052
    Likes Received:
    110
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I fail to understand your concern
    Adcoms generally view the entire profile and look for improvement on past mistakes

    just be a good interviewee "yes I want to enter a primary care specialty, I am interested in research and academic medicine, I will study 24/7 and attend all classes, I love scut work, I enjoy looking like an idiot on a daily basis......" and so on

    in all honesty, you're setting yourself up for disappointment - you won't get in and you'll be disappointed or you'll get in and see it's not living up to the pedestal you put it on.
    it's best to be open to all options
     
  5. goobernaculum

    goobernaculum Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2003
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0
    jasmine...

    there's always hope and you should keep trying if medicine is sincerely your dream. however, if schools reject you based on a past record, that is not necessarily discrimination, at least in the general sense we usually think of the term. schools are not allowed to reject you based on attributes you cannot help. for example, it is illegal to reject a student based on color, ethnicity, sex. orientation, ses standing, etc. issues from your life that have been made based on your own volition can be held against you in some cases, which is why some applications ask if you've ever been arrested for some crime. you can see the same sort of thing happen in sports. for example, some athletes will get drafted very late or not at all due to criminal or drug activity (e.g.- randy moss, warren sapp). in the medical school context, the applicant is viewed as an investement because so many resources will be thrown at them to make them into a physician. That student's performance will very much reflect the school's reputation as an educational institution. if a school doesn't want to take that kind of risk in an investment in a student with some "adverse" history, the school is well within its rights to do that.

    with that said, it seems that many schools offer applicants the opportunity to explain their past for a reason: they KNOW people change. in my view that's a very gracious move on the part of medical schools because they really don't have to do anything like that. they are, in a sense, willing to train someone to care for patients despite the possiblity that past activities might show evidence of the contrary. furthermore, there are plenty of other applicants who have not only shown they will not commit such acts, but also that they have been willing to care for patients much like they way you have in working in a hospital setting. if anything, many medical schools are willing to empathize with your situation, and you should totally milk it for all it's worth. swallow your pride, be humble in admitting your own mistakes, don't make excuses, and take it to the adcomms. the opportunity is there. keep trying and good luck.
     
  6. edmadison

    edmadison 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2001
    Messages:
    2,086
    Likes Received:
    70
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Actually, discrimination is not illegal. Certain types of discrimination are, but discrimination is how we make choices. I'm not just being scemantic here. When you choose a physcian, you may descriminate based on experience level.

    In order to present the best light, it is best to show those evaluating you that you have changed -- a proven track record over an extended length of time. This is the same principle as overcomming bad credit. That being said, there are some things that may be so significant that they can't be overcome. I don't care how good a track record a potential baby sitter has, he or she isn't getting near my kid with a past record of child abuse.

    One thing you could do is set up a meeting with an admission's dean and ask him or her what you can do to overcome your past.

    Good luck to you,

    Ed
     
  7. bangaloreuser

    bangaloreuser Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jasmine,

    I think you should definitely follow your dreams and take up medicine as a career. I thought you were going to study at SLSOM in their Pune campus in Fall 2004 ... what happened ??
    Wish you all the best.
     
  8. BTW, you're graduating in around 14-15 months, yet you've already been accepted to med school? How is that?
     
  9. Jasminegab

    Jasminegab psych student
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was was accepted into SLUSOM as 6yr student, which means that if you have at least 90 credits you can go to Pune, India and finish up your pre-med studies then go into the MD portion of the program.

    Since that time, I have talked with my medical advisor who recommended that since I graduate next May (it would have been in Dec 2004 if I had not dropped some courses) that I should stay and finish up my degree here in the US. I also was having some concerns if I should do a post-bac to better my chances of getting into a US medical school. However, after many talkes with my medical advisor, I have arrived at the decision to go to SLUSOM.

    Someone mentioned how I got accepted so early? Again, I was accepted into a 6yr international medical program. Not a US medical school which is only 4yrs. Since I'm doing my pre-med's now, I don't need to do the 6yr medical program anymore. Now I can do the 4yr medical program thus my undecisiveness on what direction I should go. However, my medical advisor advised me that since I have already been accepted ( I post dated my acceptance), I should stay with the school I was accepted to unless there was other matters which would prohibit me from attending.

    Many have read my previous post which I mention my pass background and that possing a problem for me. Well, here is a medical school which knows about my pass background and is willing to overlook my past and give me a shot. Should I decline it and see if any other medical schools out there would give me a shot? I have spent many countless nights going back and forth. Yet, why should I when the added stress is not called for. I'm happy to say that I'm going to an International medical school willing to accept me and give me a chance rather than burn my bridges and hope that some US medical school will accept me and over look my past.

    Hopes this clears up some of the confusion.
     

Share This Page