Personal Statement q?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Fossa9, Oct 31, 2001.

  1. Fossa9

    Fossa9 Junior Member
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    I know there are a few different avenues to take when writing your personal statements, eg. Why I want to be a doctor, or a personal hx, which led me to want to be a doctor, etc.
    I work with an organization, which gives free medical care to the uninsured, poor, and/or homeless. During my time w/ the organization and working w/ the homeless, I have seen many pts w/ extraordinary medical problems, but one stands out. What I would like to write about is a specific case, in which my differential dx of a potentially fatal genetic mutation of the connective tissue (Marfan Syndrome) in a homeless pt, which led this patients PCF-whom I work w/ very closely-to investigate further, and thus, through an echocardiogram, and then surgery, thwarted an aortic dissection. I would obviously elaborate on all follow-ups, and my personal experience with the case. I would like to add that the PCF noted that she had no previous experience w/ Marfan's and thus would not have caught it. Unfortunately this is the case for most previously undiagnosed pts with Marfan's. Marfan's is usually dx in adolescence and is very rare.
    I feel that my ability to catch such an unusual disorder (1 in 10,000 pts is dx w/ Marfan Syndrome) is a testament to my love of medicine and my life goal of becoming a physician.
    I know that the safest avenue is to contact the AMCAS or admissions, but I wouldn't mind any advice from my peers beforehand.
    Thanks
    Steve
     
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  3. Jonny-5

    Jonny-5 Member
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    Didn't ole Abe Lincoln have Marfan's?

    Anyway, the PS is tricky. It is all about achieving the correct balance between bragging and humility. Mostly, it depends on the tone and the kind of language you use. They are not looking for an exposition on a particular disease or a clinical case history. They just want a broader picture of you as an individual. Your committment working in the clinics etc is what they are interested in and especially (they will ask you on interviews) what you took away from the experience.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Fossa9

    Fossa9 Junior Member
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    Yes, it is believed that ol' Abe did have Marfans, although there is no genetic proof of this.
    I'm not saying that I will write an "exposition on a particular disease" as you stated.
    I'm thinking that I could use the experience to my advantage, and thus giving my PS a stand-out-from-the-croud feel. (not many premed students are blessed with such an interesting dx)
    So Jonny, what you are saying is that I could use it to an extent, but not to write from a clinical stand-point and not to just focus on one case? Thus keeping the statement "personal"? (This is what I hope to do in the long run.)
    BTW.. I am just starting the PS because the case is fresh in my mind. I am a junior and will not be applying until just before graduation. I was told that it would be a good idea to start now and leave good amount of time for revising the statement. I don't want to have to worry about it during MCAT prep.
    Thanks for the advice
    Steve
     
  5. jmejia1

    jmejia1 Senior Member
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    I think a single-case narrative can serve as an excellent PS, meanwhile interjecting your personality into it, BUT I would steer clear from medical jargon or patting yourself on the shoulder. Like the other poster suggested, the PS should a balance between one's confidence and humility. I'm not saying you would sound like you're bragging if you keep consistent with what you wrote above, but make sure you talk about the emotional dimension involved, your compassion toward the patient and so forth.
     

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