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PGSP-Stanford vs Chicago School

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by flounder229, Apr 17, 2007.

  1. flounder229

    flounder229

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    Feb 7, 2007
    I've been accepted to PGSp-Stanford and the Chicago School of Prof Psych and have no idea which one to choose. I'm from the Midwest and love Chicago and have friends and family there. I also liked the facilities and the fact htat we can choose our own internships anywhere in the city. The price was better too (although money is not my deciding factor)
    As for PGSP-Stanford, its an awesome program but I didn't like the facilities, the price, or how far from home it is. I am also interested (but not 100% sure) that I want to go into child psych and they didn't specialize in it. But from what I've heard, this is the better program, which is why this is such a tough decision for me.
    Anyone have any advice? I have to let them know by this Friday
     
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  3. DSMMad

    DSMMad 7+ Year Member

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    It sounds like you want to be in Chicago. Is the school APA certified? That may be important to you eventually. Also, would you end up miserable in CA seeing that your heart is really leaning towards the Chicago school? Just questions to ask yourself. Is being close to family important to you or do you think you would adjust in time?

    You could do research in child psych to help you "specialize" a little.
     
  4. tkj

    tkj 2+ Year Member

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    madison, wisconsin
    ...
     
  5. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    We all have our stumps.

    Jon has a lot more to offer than just his position on how a clinical program should be, so don't get too hung up on his eventual appearance; I kind of picture a Bat Signal of some sort goes up for him.

    :laugh:

    -t
     
  6. NYCPsych

    NYCPsych Clinical Psy.D. 5+ Year Member

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    Wait, it does sound like you have an idea of which one to choose. ;-) At least, you listed a lot of pros for CSPP being a good match for you, and none for PGSP. Also, CSPP has that ABA certification option, which could be a good opportunity given your child psych interest. Good luck & congrats either way!


     
  7. RayneeDeigh

    RayneeDeigh 5+ Year Member

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    I'm pretty sure it's more like a giant dollar sign. :D
     
  8. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    ouch :)


    I admit I do find it almost incomprehensible that people consider programs like this.
     
  9. RayneeDeigh

    RayneeDeigh 5+ Year Member

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    Feb 4, 2007

    Heh. All joking aside, I'm starting to see your point. Having considered PGSP myself (and turning it down in favour of a fully-funded PhD), I'm wondering how so many people rush into huge debt without thinking about their prospects for the future. Sure a small chunk of 'em will find a niche good enough to pay back their loans, but a lot of them won't.

    I also kind of um... resent that people can basically pay for degrees at some schools. I know someone who goes around telling everyone she was accepted to a prestigious PhD program but really it's a PsyD from a school that only rejects 13% of its applicants. And they're the ones bringing the salaries down for the rest of us.

    I'm having an uptight moment, don't mind me. :laugh:
     
  10. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Welcome to the darkside.
     
  11. kojo

    kojo 2+ Year Member

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    I know several PhDs in clinical and other psych fields with debt over 100k, some as high as 150k. When a dissertation drags out for years (which happens frequently) it can be very difficult to find a decent paying job, especially when trying to tie up a dissertation, thus the debt can also add up. Factor in a low paying internship and there you have it.
     
  12. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Right, but one way it's virtually guaranteed and the other, if you screw up and severely mismanage the situation it could happen. You are talking about an exception to the rule vs. the most common outcome.
     
  13. Ollie123

    Ollie123 10+ Year Member

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    Who do you know whose dissertation dragged out that long? What on earth happened?

    Not doubting you, just surprised. I've seen people take an extra year to finish, sometimes even an extra 2. I know ONE person who took 3, but that's because they had a prof who kept them busy with his grants so they were at least fully funded while staying there. Definitely not long enough to accrue 150k debt though, unless your dissertation is a clinical trial and you're trying to fund it yourself! How long were those people working on their dissertations?
     
  14. kojo

    kojo 2+ Year Member

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    I am not going to post any names but this does happen. There are many ABDs out there who for whatever reason cannot get the final dissertation defended and completed. On my internship I knew of one such person (a staff member not intern) whose professor wanted additional data and calculations apparently to support a grant he was working on which threw a curve ball into her timeline. That means extra review board applications, proposals and then conducting the study. You also need to realize that the funding offered is often not enough to live off of and may only include funding for specific time periods for which you are offically registered at the university; so if you are not offically registered anymore but are trying to finish up research, no funding for some; sure it can pay tuition and books but factor in housing and living costs and its going to be rough without additional funding, whether from a loan, a spouse working, or whatever.
     
  15. Ollie123

    Ollie123 10+ Year Member

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    Yipes.
    Here's hoping that doesn't happen to me, I can't imagine making it through 5 years of schooling and not being able to finish the dissertation in a reasonable amount of time. I don't know of anyone whose taken more than an extra year at the school I will be attending, but its still a disturbing thought.

    I recognize the funding is often not ENTIRELY enough to live off of, but it is SOMETHING, and I'd think to accrue 150k in loans one would have to be in a major city, and take at LEAST an extra 3-4 years to finish.
     
  16. amy203

    amy203 5+ Year Member

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    I agree. 74% of graduates from univeristy-based clinical psychology programs leave with less then $30,000 in debt (and that includes undergraduate loans and living expenses). There are exceptions, but most people mangage to get through grad school without huge amounts of debt.
     
  17. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Ok.....time to get back to the PGSP-Stanford v Chicago School discussion.

    :laugh:

    Ya'll are like trying to herd a bunch of cats!!

    -t
     
  18. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    I didn't do it.
     

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