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Pharmacist wanting to become DO residency question

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by flyers0806, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. flyers0806

    2+ Year Member

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    I am a pharmacist, just turned 30 years old. I truly do not see myself doing this career for 30 more years and have always been interested in DO school. Here is my question and issue I'm struggling with. I currently have a likely forever house, pharmacist husband with his ideal job here. I am interested in applying to DO school close to here, and my stats are very competitive.

    This is my question- I live near a city with many residency opportunities. Is it possible to apply for residency if I am not very relocatable? I can't see moving my husband, leaving my house and family, however there are opportunities here. Is this asking too much and something I should forget about.

    Thanks for any input.
     
  2. Black Coffee 24/7

    Black Coffee 24/7 Membership Revoked
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    The only way that you might stay in the same location for residency is if you're fine with either FM, weak IM programs, or Peds.

    Chances are that you're going to move somewhere for residency if you are not interested in these fields.
     
  3. acapnial

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    In a big city with lots of residencies it could work out, but in my experience a lot of the people with catastrophic failures in the match were people who couldn't/wouldn't compromise on location. And it depends on how nearby. If your residency were an hour away that'd be a less than ideal situation.
     
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  4. libertyyne

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    If there are lots of residencies near by and you are looking towards non competitive fields it is probable, but not 100% guaranteed.
     
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    #4 libertyyne, Feb 11, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
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  5. Dr.Bruh

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    Unfortunately uncertainly and relocation are near guarantees for most medical students (MD and DO). Even more with DO since many are relocated for rotations.
     
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  6. AlbinoHawk DO

    AlbinoHawk DO PeeGeeWai Osteopath
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    This is wrong. If you're not willing to relocate, don't go to medical school. Don't bank on your preferred program (even in FM) being a sure thing. It's as simple as that.
     
  7. Mass Effect

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    What region of the country are you in? If you're talking about NYC or L.A. or Boston, don't bank on getting a residency in those areas, even in FM or IM. You need to be open to the very real possibility of having to move for residency. The good news is, residency is finite and you could keep your home, but pay for an apartment in your new city with the money you're making now before starting med school. If you match locally, just re-invest the money you saved for the apartment somewhere else.
     
  8. Angus Avagadro

    Physician Faculty

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    Dont go to medical school if you have preconditions. It is a setup for disappointment.
     
  9. Wjldenver

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    From an ROI perspective, enrolling in medical school at this point in your career would be a big mistake. Your opportunity cost is over $752K. I saw that you are a pharmacist in Philadelphia currently making $138K per year. Losing that salary alone for four years represents an opportunity cost of $552K. Also consider the 3 or 4 years of a low resident's salary.

    In my view, look into the Executive MBA program at Wharton. You can easily leverage your background as a pharmacist and can transition to an executive role in the pharmaceutical or biotech industry very quickly at a salary which exceeds most physicians. A friend of mine gave her daughter with a somewhat similar background to yours the same advice, and she is now a first year in Harvard's MBA program.
     
  10. anon6134

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    It sounds like you have exactly the life you want and are a little bored with your job. If I was in your boat, I'd look into the MBA as suggested above, pharm clinical residency or clinical work jobs, or something completely different.

    If you are from Philly, I'm assuming you are talking about PCOM. With "very competitive" stats there's also Cooper, Drexel, Jeff, and Temple within a few miles that your competitive stats should be within range. If you don't think you're competitive for them, it is unlikely you are a sure-shot at getting into PCOM first go-around, especially (presumptively) without an MCAT yet.

    If you do get into PCOM, half their class travels around PA for 3rd and 4th year. Some will be in/around Philly but I certainly wouldn't bank on it. Residency is a whole other story as mentioned numerous times above.

    Medical school and training will upend your life in ways that you can't imagine prior to starting. If you have a tolerable career with a solid life trajectory at this point in time, unless it is absolutely your life calling to be a physician, make changes to your current career and life that will fix whatever yearning you currently feel. Take some of that $500k and plan a nice long vacation
     
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  11. Sardonix

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    I can think of few worse ideas for someone who already has their whole life figured out.
     
  12. ortho1119

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    Ouch, are the pharmacy pay cuts getting that bad? I know walgreens started cutting recently and is transitioning to hiring floaters without benefits but dang, this is a big jump
     
  13. SpartanDOnoharm

    Pharmacist Gold Donor Verified Account

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    As a pharmacist in his 30's who is going to medical school I will tell you, it has to be something you want to do, not for money, not for prestige, but because you have a passion for medicine. In the end it will end up costing you around 1.5-2 million dollars once you factor in opportunity costs, tuition, interest, decreased wages during residency. It all adds up. If the only reason you want to go to medical school is because you are unsure about the pharmacy job climate (which I don't blame you) I would start learning to invest, real estate...stocks, something to start making your money work for you.

    As far as your husband and family goes, I think it would be a good conversation to have with them. Medical school is time consuming, even for a pharmacist that has learned about medicine and rounded with physicians daily. Not only is it time consuming, but you have to be willing to make sacrifices: living arrangements, monetary, and lifestyle. It shouldn't be a decision you take lightly. I personally spent about 3-4 years deliberating going back or not before I finally decided to.

    That being said, as a person who made great money, practiced at the top of my pharmacy license, had an amazing schedule, and loved the life I was living...going to medical school has so far been the best decision I have ever made. At times it can be tedious and frustrating (I'm thinking of you Krebs cycle), but still, it was a good decision. I also am single, no kids so that made an easier decision for me. Had I been married, I'm not sure what I would have done.

    If you need more advice or input, feel free to send me a PM.
     
  14. QueenJames

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    Research.

    Go develop some new drug that's super addicting.

    Then develop the ANTIDOTE to that drug.

    Profit.

    Buy any medical school of your choice lol
     
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  15. Ho0v-man

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    You could save yourself a lot of time by just setting a million dollars on fire and hitting yourself in the head with a brick. This plan makes no financial sense.
     
  16. longerlongerlongerdrop

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    I'm an older DO student and agree that you really have to go into it expecting the least desirable scenario. When I applied to schools, I told my long term partner there was a real possibility of me being placed out of state. I have also said flat out that I have no control over over where I am placed for residency, and asked for a commitment for them to move with me no matter what when and if that time comes (and did mention this would be a deal breaker for me). I think you'll have to have a similar conversation with your husband if medicine feels like your true calling. Obviously I am not married and your situation is different, but if he is not willing at all to relocate if needed, I would explore other paths.

    That being said, your experience will make your application much more competitive for many fields. I know of at least two other students that either graduated from pharmacy school, or were practicing before going DO.

    I'd just like to note: Medical school is difficult to get through at any age, but there are times that I feel like it really is harder for older students. The more obvious barriers are if you want to have children/already have children (although many students do have kids), and managing the extreme stress can be harder as you age if you don't take care of yourself. Every dang test I still pull an all nighter, despite trying my hardest to avoid it. When I was 23, I bounced back pretty easily...now I have HTN most days. The less obvious barriers are the difficulties of reverting back to a student role. If you have already worked full-time, giving up the money and respect that can come with those positions is difficult, especially with the uncertainty that follows. It was the right choice for me, but I am not sure that I would have given up a salary that made six figures.
     
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  17. libertyyne

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    A lot of what you said is true, However just wanted to add that there is no reason to ever pull all nighters regularly in medical school.
     
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  18. longerlongerlongerdrop

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    I agree. Please tell my anxiety for me lol
     
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  19. BorntobeDO?

    BorntobeDO? SDN Bronze Donor
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    We have had this discussion before. I also had many all nighters experience, especially with kids, you sometimes need that extra time.
     
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    #19 BorntobeDO?, Mar 14, 2019 at 11:52 PM
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019 at 12:04 AM
  20. longerlongerlongerdrop

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    haha I don't have kids personally. Honestly, I'm just now starting to stay on top of the work load, so hopefully I'll be able to avoid it for the last few. My school had some extra stressors this year though too, so I think overall there were more sleepless faces on test days than previous classes.

    I think I've read a few of your replies on how you balance school with family life though. You're the real MVP.
     
  21. ortnakas

    ortnakas DO PGY-1
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    If you live in a large and DO-friendly city, it’s a possibility, but there are no guarantees. Don’t go down this road if moving (possibly multiple times) is not an option.
     

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