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Pharmacopeoia - Dissapointed

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by Llenroc, Jul 30, 2006.

  1. Llenroc

    Llenroc Bandidos Motorcycle Club
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    I just got the shirt pocket edition of Pharmacopeioa and I'm kind of dissapointed. There's not much in there about the mechanism of action of drugs. I think it's probably more useful as a prescribing or dosing referencing for doctors and pharmacists, than as a tool to look up what drugs do for med students.

    I hear there's also a "Deluxe, Lab Coat" edition of this book. Is that any better?
     
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  3. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Fides et ratio.
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    If you want more information about mechanism, etc., look into Lexi-Comp: http://www.lexi.com/lexistore/marketing/prodinfo/books/BKDIH00140607/index.jsp
     
  4. Llenroc

    Llenroc Bandidos Motorcycle Club
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  5. njbmd

    njbmd Guest
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    Hi there,
    If you are a medical student, your pocket Pharmacopoeia will become more useful as you move along through your clinical rotations. For me, as a surgeon, it's most useful when a patient comes in with a huge list of prescribed meds with no dosages or trade names. I found the PDA program Epocrates pretty good in term of refreshing my memory as to mechanism of action for a pharmaceutical. I even used this program as a second-year student.

    The Deluxe edition of the Pharmacopoeia just has larger print (for the most part). It is still a prescribing guide.

    njbmd :)
     
  6. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Fides et ratio.
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    That's why physicians prefer the Tarascon Pocket Pharmacopoeia.

    If you want to carry something huge like Lexi-Comp around with you, get the PDA version. Pocket reference books went out with the powdered wig, buddy. Welcome to the 21st century. ;)
     
  7. Rpre19

    Rpre19 Member
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    well, i have pdr (free) for my smartphone & I have gotten info quickly that my interns were struggling to find w/ their tarascon. but a couple of residents told me that i should use epocrates for the differential features...think i might get it but it is ~$70 bucks :( so we'll see. I'm attempting to set a record for least $$ spent (that & I like to eat all the way thru next July lol)
     
  8. p53

    p53 ****** for F******
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    I used Pharmacopeioa almost every day of 3rd year. The reason is because I volunteered to write scripts for my residents, and it is very handy to look up trade names to generic names (lopressor/metoprolol).

    As for the MOA, it is assumed that you have some knowledge of this studying for Step 1. If you have to refresh your memory, I recommend Pharmacology for Boards and Wards.

    As for the shelf exams, out of 100 questions in each specialty I had about 2-3 questions in Internal Medicine, Psych, and Peds (on Surgery and OB I had zero questions) on MOA.

    Plus, you will likely know more about MOA of certain drugs than most residents and interns because they are so far removed from 2nd year Pharm. Also, the attendings usually pimp you on your patients, so it is highly unlikely they will pimp you on the MOA of a drug. They would prefer that you know the indication and side effects of the drugs. Lastly, don't worry about the dosages so much.

    Good Luck
     
  9. lynx

    lynx Member
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    No, deluxe edition doesn't have the mechanism either....Like other people said - PDA software, like free epocrates, does have the mechanism of action.
     
  10. Joel Fleischman

    Joel Fleischman Senior Member
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    you can get a basic version for epocrates for free... (the for-fee version has other diagnosis and formulary stuff... probably not as important for a med student) ....

    is epocrates a viable alternative for the Tarscons book ...or is there something missing that I will find I wish i had?
     
  11. Pegsie

    Pegsie Junior Member
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    Our 4th years said to have either Pharmacopoeia or ePocrates, so you probably won't need both.
     
  12. enanareina

    enanareina small but scrappy
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    I used my Pharmacopoeia at the county hospital when I was afraid I'd get my PDA stolen, and I use the free ePocrates now that I can have my stuff with me all the time. There's a lot more information about dosing, drug interactions, and mechanism of action in ePocrates, and it's pretty easy to look up a generic name to get the trade name and vice versa. My only complaint is that I felt it was a little faster to get that info in the pocket book, but there's so much more info in ePocrates that I think it's worth it. I'm also not the quickest draw on the PDA, so take that with a grain of salt.
     

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