PharmDude120k

2+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2017
38
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Pharmacy Student
I didn't match. I'm devastated. Applied to 21 programs, interviewed at 6, got an email early this morning saying I didn't match. Always been an above-average student, 3.9 gpa, involved in school, etc. Been working retail for the past 4 years and it was good, but has exponentially gotten worse and am looking for a way out of this nightmare. Interviews were hit or miss. Some issues that I can't personally prevent. Very likely some immoral individuals and some slander was involved. You can't control others and their subjective perceptions. I live in a competitive area, but applied to many rural sites as well. Most of my interviews were with competitive sites strangely and was turned down by a lot of the less competitive ones out of the way. Working retail full time while doing residency applications, interviews, etc. is rough and exhausting compared to students blissfully on their "off block" unaware of the slaughter that could await them. Obviously going to be not as up to date with my clinical knowledge as some other candidates, but I had plenty of extra credentials that set me apart. Guess no one wanted to take a chance when they have dozens of other fresh graduates. Don't know what to do now. If feels like an uncontrollable lottery. I put a huge amount of effort and time into my application (not to mention the extortion that is the application fee) over the past few months and it seems like for nothing. I want to be optimistic, but seeing the direction the world has gone where a decade+ of hard work and investing in my career leaves me with a horrible, depressing job I hate and can't escape trying to pay off my "debt to the educational system" makes it hard. And pharmacists aren't alone. At least a bunch of academic administrators, shareholders and ACPE have made bank off me and my generation's hard work trying to escape the massive wealth inequality we've been born into. Watch the stock market tumble 5-10% every day crushing my savings after trying to eke out some financial security in the current environment where previous generations have enjoyed rediculous gains.

We'll see about Phase II, but at best I'll have to uproot my life and work for an organization no one wants to be at slaving away for a year for half pay for the luxury of maybe having a job with them when I graduate. The chance of having a job with the excellent organization I mainly applied to after doing any kind of phase II residency is pretty much zero. Back to work I guess. Just one round of hour cuts away from driving for Uber for minimum wage. Working myself to death to pay off social security and pensions for the boomers (which my generation will not have) hoping I'll be able to afford a house and raise a family by the time I retire (if I retire). No raise again this year, more hours cuts. Barely keeping my high deductible benefits.

Wish everyone the best no matter where this career takes you. I know I'm being negative, but sometimes pessimism is correct and warranted. I know I'll find a path forward.
 
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Mar 13, 2020
2
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Pharmacy Student, Pharmacist
Worked retail 2 years and matched at my first choice site 10mins away from my residence. I had 4 interview out of 9 I applied. I think you should try again next year. Work on your interview skills and prepare great and compelling answers for prominent questions.
I know we are at a disadvantage coming out of retail Per public opinion. The goal at your interviews is to make retail an advantage for you at the interviews.

I totally understand your disappointment but don’t give up. Go for it again next year and I’m here as a resource should you need it.
 
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PharmDude120k

2+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2017
38
23
Status
Pharmacy Student
Worked retail 2 years and matched at my first choice site 10mins away from my residence. I had 4 interview out of 9 I applied. I think you should try again next year. Work on your interview skills and prepare great and compelling answers for prominent questions.
I know we are at a disadvantage coming out of retail Per public opinion. The goal at your interviews is to make retail an advantage for you at the interviews.

I totally understand your disappointment but don’t give up. Go for it again next year and I’m here as a resource should you need it.
I already prepared like crazy for the interviews. I had good answers for all the obvious questions that would be asked about my application. I just didn't win the lottery. For whatever reason, all the sites I applied to are ones that put extreme emphasis on clinical questions during the interviews and there's no way to know which sites have what kind of interviews before you apply. Makes no sense to hire people off information they're going to learn during the residency when they've already demonstrated they are very capable on paper and there are much more important things to consider when hiring someone. Was hoping at least one of the programs I applied to would have such a philosophy. I spent a ridiculous amount of time on my applications. I applied to 21 programs and did 6 interviews. I deserved to match. Unfortunately, you will never know why you were ranked the way you were. What I can say is that subjectivity is not fair during any decision-making process and yet it is, unfortunately, a huge part of human interaction. I'm not sinking another 5 months of my life and $1000 in app fees into this next year. I'll assess my options, try to find a job with a better company that doesn't treat their employees like slaves in the meantime and probably maneuver to leave the profession altogether in the long run. What a waste of 8 years of my 20's working myself to death. Why would anyone put up with this profession when I talk to tech workers all the time who have easy, engaging, unstressful jobs with unlimited career potential who don't have preceptors or boomer managers who can extort new grads. I appreciate your input and offer to help, but I was directed down the wrong path by an unhelpful educational system and all my incredible potential I had going into university has now been wasted.

I understand I am being pessimistic, but this is the reality.
 
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Whysoez

OMS-0
Oct 15, 2019
290
393
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Medical Student
Your posts... if that same attitude came through during the interviews, no wonder you didn't match.
Possibly

To OP, you are not the only person working hard/trying their best hoping to match, only thing you can do now is try even harder next year. I wish you the best of luck.
 
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Hels2007

I bite
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10+ Year Member
Jun 30, 2007
1,227
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I would *never* hire someone who sincerely believes "I spent lots of time applying" = "I deserve to match". That's logic for kindergartners, not for supposed adults. The generation that grew up with participation trophies is upon us...
 

Sabril

2+ Year Member
Dec 23, 2017
194
132
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Pharmacist
This is my idiotic comment of the month (I allow myself six per month). Of any year, I don't know if I would envy the incoming class of residents this year. With the economic threat of what is going on, this may not be the most ideal time to get stuck with a year of low paying job. Whether good or bad things coming out of this, I would think the people who have a little more financial mean and flexibility (moving, changing job, or even quit) would fare better.
 
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PharmDude120k

2+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2017
38
23
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Pharmacy Student
I would *never* hire someone who sincerely believes "I spent lots of time applying" = "I deserve to match". That's logic for kindergartners, not for supposed adults. The generation that grew up with participation trophies is upon us...
Thank you to those who had support to offer. Yes, people who work hard to get where they want to go should be rewarded. Sadly, that's not the case. During my interviews I had multiple pharmacists unprompted share their stories about how easy their career path had been. Only applied to one residency and didn't even really take it seriously and got in, got the job without a residency cause they knew a guy, didn't even really know anything about my specialty, but there was an opening and figured it out along the way, heard it all, multiple times. It was obviously a reaction to the fact that virtually everyone knows how ridiculous the process is and honestly the economy in general has become and most have sympathy.

This is my idiotic comment of the month (I allow myself six per month). Of any year, I don't know if I would envy the incoming class of residents this year. With the economic threat of what is going on, this may not be the most ideal time to get stuck with a year of low paying job. Whether good or bad things coming out of this, I would think the people who have a little more financial mean and flexibility (moving, changing job, or even quit) would fare better.
Those in the clinical world have no idea how bad it's gotten in retail. Everyone is either resigning themselves to their fate and running out the clock or abandoning ship at whatever the cost. Having a 40-year career after having half pay for a year infinitely beats working yourself to death and then being laid off in 5-10 years to make way for a cheaper grad. That is all I will say.
 

Hels2007

I bite
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Jun 30, 2007
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Yes, people who work hard to get where they want to go should be rewarded.
If you spend 20 hours a day digging holes and then filling them somewhere in the middle of Wyoming - are you working hard? The issue is that time and effort spent are meaningless if there is no result that's of any use to anyone else. Rewards don't magically drop out of the sky, they are given to you by someone else either in return for or in anticipation of whatever value you have brought/will bring them. Why would hospitals care how much time you spent on your applications or interview preparations if that time didn't translate into anything meaningful? How much time and effort you choose to expend is up to you, only the results matter. Back in my day you learned in elementary school, that it's not how many hours you studied, it's how many questions you got right. Not how many miles you ran on the field, but how many goals you scored. Not how much time you spent cooking dinner but how it tastes.

I don't disagree that it's stiff competition for good jobs out there, but your attitude is not making it easier for you to 'win' this game.
 
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RxEvileye

5+ Year Member
Jun 13, 2013
184
127
California
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Pharmacist
Very likely some immoral individuals and some slander was involved. You can't control others and their subjective perceptions.
:eyebrow:

Your credentials get you the interview, but once you are there, so many things could have led to you not matching that you need to consider. Do you think you were genuine even for the questions you say you prepared a great deal for?

Almost every residency interview can have clinical portions as fair game, and your high GPA will not insulate you from being compared to everyone else who had the same questions. If you think this was your weakest point it is something you can work and reflect on as you keep trying. Did you guess incorrectly? Did you explain your thought processes? Did you backtrack your answers or get frustrated? Sometimes they ask off-the-wall things just to see how you think.
 
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PharmDude120k

2+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2017
38
23
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Pharmacy Student
:eyebrow:

Your credentials get you the interview, but once you are there, so many things could have led to you not matching that you need to consider. Do you think you were genuine even for the questions you say you prepared a great deal for?

Almost every residency interview can have clinical portions as fair game, and your high GPA will not insulate you from being compared to everyone else who had the same questions. If you think this was your weakest point it is something you can work and reflect on as you keep trying. Did you guess incorrectly? Did you explain your thought processes? Did you backtrack your answers or get frustrated? Sometimes they ask off-the-wall things just to see how you think.
Interviews are a horrible way to determine who to hire. Every good hiring manager who knows anything knows this. I'm not just some random 20-something naive graduate. Let's just say without giving identifying info I know what I'm doing. Your ability to answer a brief series of random questions and the subjective interpretation by the person on the other end has almost zero correlation with your ability to be a pharmacist which is a completely different skillset. It's literally 100% a game and a lottery and all you can do is try to buy as many tickets a possible. Organizations do interviews because it's cost-efficient and they honestly don't care too much who gets selected beyond getting someone who meets the requirements/qualifications who can do the job. In a pool of 100 candidates, at least 30 of them are qualified for the job. The interviewer likes sports and you don't? Guess you don't get the job because you don't fit in. You were in a fraternity the interviewer doesn't like? Out of luck. Institutionalized racism is a thing. Physical attractiveness affects your prospects. Many sociological studies to back this up. Said something that's appropriate where you're from, but apparently not to the interviewer? Shame. Miscommunications and misinterpretations happen sometimes and you can't control another's perception of them. You may think you're not biased and don't let these kinds of things affect your decisions, but they do on a subconscious level. The list goes on and on.

If you were forced to work yourself to death for a horrible company who steals from their employees and couldn't care less about med errors and harming/killing customers and you came home physically and mentally exhausted every day watching hours get cut and your career disappear you spent years working for just so you could pay off some educational administrator working a job that shouldn't even exist you too would have depression. Companies who actually care about their employees and want to invest in them long term have job interviews where they do the actual job they'll be doing instead of an interview. Pharmacists are a dime a dozen and organizations simply don't care enough other than to ask some questions and pick a name.
 
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PharmDude120k

2+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2017
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If you spend 20 hours a day digging holes and then filling them somewhere in the middle of Wyoming - are you working hard? The issue is that time and effort spent are meaningless if there is no result that's of any use to anyone else. Rewards don't magically drop out of the sky, they are given to you by someone else either in return for or in anticipation of whatever value you have brought/will bring them. Why would hospitals care how much time you spent on your applications or interview preparations if that time didn't translate into anything meaningful? How much time and effort you choose to expend is up to you, only the results matter. Back in my day you learned in elementary school, that it's not how many hours you studied, it's how many questions you got right. Not how many miles you ran on the field, but how many goals you scored. Not how much time you spent cooking dinner but how it tastes.

I don't disagree that it's stiff competition for good jobs out there, but your attitude is not making it easier for you to 'win' this game.
I'm not a moron and your assumptions show how little you care about others' perspectives. I'm aware outputs are more important on inputs. That's a central premise of productivity and leadership. Are you yourself a manger by chance? Studies show individuals with sociopathic tendencies tend to be very good at getting management positions--more so that people who know how to lead and motivate others. If you want to focus on a single word ("time") and then make things up about me as an argument then go for it. My interviews went fine, a couple of them there were minor issues outside of my control. "My attitude" is an appropriate reaction to a horrible system created by your generation that I'm expressing on this forum. You were on watch when you guys created this mess. And now you think it's appropriate to laugh at and blame the people dealing with the consequences. I've lived in many states and (undiagnosed) depression among young adults is easily over 50% due to the extensive list of real stressors we have to deal with every day. Not having this argument with you. Not going to list all the problems that I haven't caused and all I've done to try to overcome them just to be shafted and told by you that you couldn't care less. "My attitude" also stems from the fact that this is a (theoretically) anonymous web forum where we can share genuine, honest, truthful ideas without having to worry about the consequences of how it affects others' perceptions. Thank you to everyone who had support to offer. Good luck to everyone with their future endeavors.
 
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rxdawg21

7+ Year Member
Jan 19, 2013
375
230
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Pharmacist
I'm not a moron and your assumptions show how little you care about others' perspectives. I'm aware outputs are more important on inputs. That's a central premise of productivity and leadership. Are you yourself a manger by chance? Studies show individuals with sociopathic tendencies tend to be very good at getting management positions--more so that people who know how to lead and motivate others. If you want to focus on a single word ("time") and then make things up about me as an argument then go for it. My interviews went fine, a couple of them there were minor issues outside of my control. "My attitude" is an appropriate reaction to a horrible system created by your generation that I'm expressing on this forum. You were on watch when you guys created this mess. And now you think it's appropriate to laugh at and blame the people dealing with the consequences. I've lived in many states and (undiagnosed) depression among young adults is easily over 50% due to the extensive list of real stressors we have to deal with every day. Not having this argument with you. Not going to list all the problems that I haven't caused and all I've done to try to overcome them just to be shafted and told by you that you couldn't care less. "My attitude" also stems from the fact that this is a (theoretically) anonymous web forum where we can share genuine, honest, truthful ideas without having to worry about the consequences of how it affects others' perceptions. Thank you to everyone who had support to offer. Good luck to everyone with their future endeavors.
While I only have experience with one site for interviews, I will say at least at our site, the paper application is your spot in the door. We have so many highly qualified people on paper. When we interview we are looking at fit and personality. Most everyone we interview we hope would be there intellectually.

In addition, ASHP is weird with how they march and someone that ranks many programs can actually hurt themselves.

I personally know a great applicant a few years back that was one of the best students we had and got 8 interviews everywhere she applied. However, she didn’t match and had to scramble. She ended up staying and working at the place she matched with. I’m not sure why she didn’t match and I agree with you there are a lot of factors outside your control that affect this process.

Advice I have:

stay positive
Focus on Presenting yourself in the best light. Focus on your strengths and show your committed. Tailor your answers to reflect this along with teamwork and grace under difficult situations.
Focus on know basic guidelines.

And new this year, do not take forever to answer a question. This was the first year where a resident continued to elaborate long after sufficiently answering and actually took away from there interview. Most are too brief, this was the opposite
 
Apr 18, 2018
442
544
Status
Pharmacist
All generations are to blame. The boomer generation could possibly have stopped the mandatory pharmD and the trend to up sell excess education when it isn't needed for graduates, like residency programs. They could have worked harder to obtain provider status. But the current generation is not by any means blameless. They are adding to the problem by continuing to apply to pharmacy school and feeding warm bodies into the machine itself. Pharmacy right now is a "no win" proposition for anyone entering the field. I can't figure out why anyone would expect a good outcome from graduating anymore. Yet if you go over to the student forum, you see tons of naive kids who've never been told that they "failed" at anything being set up for a rude introduction to reality. There are plenty of posts on these forums that describe the reality of the profession. Choosing to ignore that reality doesn't change the outcome.
 
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Jbrl

2+ Year Member
May 7, 2015
343
296
Interviews are a horrible way to determine who to hire. Every good hiring manager who knows anything knows this. I'm not just some random 20-something naive graduate. Let's just say without giving identifying info I know what I'm doing. Your ability to answer a brief series of random questions and the subjective interpretation by the person on the other end has almost zero correlation with your ability to be a pharmacist which is a completely different skillset. It's literally 100% a game and a lottery and all you can do is try to buy as many tickets a possible. Organizations do interviews because it's cost-efficient and they honestly don't care too much who gets selected beyond getting someone who meets the requirements/qualifications who can do the job. In a pool of 100 candidates, at least 30 of them are qualified for the job. The interviewer likes sports and you don't? Guess you don't get the job because you don't fit in. You were in a fraternity the interviewer doesn't like? Out of luck. Institutionalized racism is a thing. Physical attractiveness affects your prospects. Many sociological studies to back this up. Said something that's appropriate where you're from, but apparently not to the interviewer? Shame. Miscommunications and misinterpretations happen sometimes and you can't control another's perception of them. You may think you're not biased and don't let these kinds of things affect your decisions, but they do on a subconscious level. The list goes on and on.

If you were forced to work yourself to death for a horrible company who steals from their employees and couldn't care less about med errors and harming/killing customers and you came home physically and mentally exhausted every day watching hours get cut and your career disappear you spent years working for just so you could pay off some educational administrator working a job that shouldn't even exist you too would have depression. Companies who actually care about their employees and want to invest in them long term have job interviews where they do the actual job they'll be doing instead of an interview. Pharmacists are a dime a dozen and organizations simply don't care enough other than to ask some questions and pick a name.
I'm not a moron and your assumptions show how little you care about others' perspectives. I'm aware outputs are more important on inputs. That's a central premise of productivity and leadership. Are you yourself a manger by chance? Studies show individuals with sociopathic tendencies tend to be very good at getting management positions--more so that people who know how to lead and motivate others. If you want to focus on a single word ("time") and then make things up about me as an argument then go for it. My interviews went fine, a couple of them there were minor issues outside of my control. "My attitude" is an appropriate reaction to a horrible system created by your generation that I'm expressing on this forum. You were on watch when you guys created this mess. And now you think it's appropriate to laugh at and blame the people dealing with the consequences. I've lived in many states and (undiagnosed) depression among young adults is easily over 50% due to the extensive list of real stressors we have to deal with every day. Not having this argument with you. Not going to list all the problems that I haven't caused and all I've done to try to overcome them just to be shafted and told by you that you couldn't care less. "My attitude" also stems from the fact that this is a (theoretically) anonymous web forum where we can share genuine, honest, truthful ideas without having to worry about the consequences of how it affects others' perceptions. Thank you to everyone who had support to offer. Good luck to everyone with their future endeavors.
I think some more introspection might be helpful to understand what went wrong and where you can improve. I get that you feel immensely frustrated, but the general tone of your commentary focuses on injustices done by others and by the system, instead of what you could have done better and what you can do now with all that in mind.
 

RxEvileye

5+ Year Member
Jun 13, 2013
184
127
California
Status
Pharmacist
Interviews are a horrible way to determine who to hire. Every good hiring manager who knows anything knows this. I'm not just some random 20-something naive graduate. Let's just say without giving identifying info I know what I'm doing. Your ability to answer a brief series of random questions and the subjective interpretation by the person on the other end has almost zero correlation with your ability to be a pharmacist which is a completely different skillset. It's literally 100% a game and a lottery and all you can do is try to buy as many tickets a possible. Organizations do interviews because it's cost-efficient and they honestly don't care too much who gets selected beyond getting someone who meets the requirements/qualifications who can do the job. In a pool of 100 candidates, at least 30 of them are qualified for the job. The interviewer likes sports and you don't? Guess you don't get the job because you don't fit in. You were in a fraternity the interviewer doesn't like? Out of luck. Institutionalized racism is a thing. Physical attractiveness affects your prospects. Many sociological studies to back this up. Said something that's appropriate where you're from, but apparently not to the interviewer? Shame. Miscommunications and misinterpretations happen sometimes and you can't control another's perception of them. You may think you're not biased and don't let these kinds of things affect your decisions, but they do on a subconscious level. The list goes on and on.

If you were forced to work yourself to death for a horrible company who steals from their employees and couldn't care less about med errors and harming/killing customers and you came home physically and mentally exhausted every day watching hours get cut and your career disappear you spent years working for just so you could pay off some educational administrator working a job that shouldn't even exist you too would have depression. Companies who actually care about their employees and want to invest in them long term have job interviews where they do the actual job they'll be doing instead of an interview. Pharmacists are a dime a dozen and organizations simply don't care enough other than to ask some questions and pick a name.
Rest assured I have interviewed many people in many settings, and am well aware of the issues in the article you sent. I have helped develop and participated in not just interviews, but Multiple Mini Interviews and other formats attempting to (and which have evidence for) controlling for many of these factors and biases for both potential pharmacy students and residents. Yes, there are other factors like subconscious and conscious biases regarding racism, attractiveness etc. but do you really think this applied to your own interviews?

The evidence mentioned in that article does not perfectly apply directly to our profession's interviews in every setting. A preceptor at a residency interview asking you how you would manage a patient case is a direct job skills test. Asking you to take time at home to prepare a presentation is a direct job skills test. Some sites even have separate "regular-style" interviews where some are focused around relevant problem-solving or other skills rather than just standard interview questions. And then maybe a resident separately gave you a tour and saw what you asked about or whether you seemed interested in being there. When the RPD gathers all the groups together and asks about performance from each of them, do you really think that the 15-second judgement kinds of rules applied to every group at every interview in your case? Do you think the process of narrowing at least 100 applicants down to say 20 people and organizing interviews to spend a year or more training someone is just picking people who are a dime a dozen? People who have been on the other side like me see have seen this is not a decision programs take lightly.

I am asking you these questions because I think now is a time for introspection as others have pointed out. Do you think being resentful of your retail position and wanting residency as a way out could have come through or been perceived as a factor in how you were judged? Doubling down and throwing out ideas like fraternity membership or sports just makes me less confident in how you might have handled the various situations or come across. It is not a bad idea to ask RPDs for feedback on how to improve or how you did, and the self-reflection, continuous improvement, and reaching out to maintain a connection is a skill in its own.

I am sorry to hear you say you may have depression and are exhausted, and of course mental health is very important and can affect how you did on these interviews. Residency itself can be a weighty decision because so many residents experience burnout from its many demands. It is not my place to tell you if you need to seek help, but it should be available for you somehow and I hope you feel better. I also hope venting on this forum has helped you in some way.
 
Jan 9, 2019
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If you spend 20 hours a day digging holes and then filling them somewhere in the middle of Wyoming - are you working hard? The issue is that time and effort spent are meaningless if there is no result that's of any use to anyone else. Rewards don't magically drop out of the sky, they are given to you by someone else either in return for or in anticipation of whatever value you have brought/will bring them. Why would hospitals care how much time you spent on your applications or interview preparations if that time didn't translate into anything meaningful? How much time and effort you choose to expend is up to you, only the results matter. Back in my day you learned in elementary school, that it's not how many hours you studied, it's how many questions you got right. Not how many miles you ran on the field, but how many goals you scored. Not how much time you spent cooking dinner but how it tastes.

I don't disagree that it's stiff competition for good jobs out there, but your attitude is not making it easier for you to 'win' this game.
Grief happens in 5 stages: denial, anger, depression, bargaining and acceptance.

OP is probably in step 2 right now so just give it some time and he'll lighten up.
 

wazoodog

7+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2012
61
109
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Pharmacist
Interviews are a weird thing. I recall interviewing a young PharmD who sounded very rehearsed and mechanical. He obviously prepared hard but for some reason, it just didnt come off as genuine. He did not get the job (consensus decision among 6 interviewers). Another young woman was very outgoing and answered questions assertively and intelligently. She got the job but was somewhat entitled and clueless about how to teach and motivate herself. A third had an okay interview - nothing remarkable but intelligent answers. He later admitted he didnt successfully match anywhere when he was looking for clinical residencies but he got the job (industry) and he is an outstanding and valuable addition to the team. Point is, dont get yourself down. Interviews ,unfortunately, are part of the game but if you got the goods it'll work out in the end.
 
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Nov 11, 2019
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Grief happens in 5 stages: denial, anger, depression, bargaining and acceptance.

OP is probably in step 2 right now so just give it some time and he'll lighten up.
I also failed to match with any residency programs during phase 1 (and I'm assuming I'll end up facing the same outcome for phase 2, even though I applied broadly), but surprisingly enough, my psyche seemed to jump straight to the acceptance stage, with me being objective about comparing my strengths/weaknesses to the other applicants.
 
Jan 9, 2019
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I also failed to match with any residency programs during phase 1 (and I'm assuming I'll end up facing the same outcome for phase 2, even though I applied broadly), but surprisingly enough, my psyche seemed to jump straight to the acceptance stage, with me being objective about comparing my strengths/weaknesses to the other applicants.
That's because you weren't in grief to begin with. You were at best "exploring" residency as you only started looking into it P4 year which is way too late by any modern day standard. OP on the other hand seems to have made investments into applying for residency and fell short. When you invest time, energy and trade opportunity costs for the sake of residency and fall short of course it is going to sting. And before you say it, spending time working on apps and writing essays is not what I'm talking about. It's doing the activities and getting the experiences that will score you points on a residency application before you even apply that counts as true sacrifices.

That being said I could possibly be giving OP too much credit since I am only hearing his side of the story. There could be character or personality flaws that were made apparent at interviews, or he could have embellished his experiences in which case I would happily retract my statements. Nobody will really know except OP and the programs OP interviewed with.
 
Nov 11, 2019
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That's because you weren't in grief to begin with. You were at best "exploring" residency as you only started looking into it P4 year which is way too late by any modern day standard. OP on the other hand seems to have made investments into applying for residency and fell short. When you invest time, energy and trade opportunity costs for the sake of residency and fall short of course it is going to sting. And before you say it, spending time working on apps and writing essays is not what I'm talking about. It's doing the activities and getting the experiences that will score you points on a residency application before you even apply that counts as true sacrifices.

That being said I could possibly be giving OP too much credit since I am only hearing his side of the story. There could be character or personality flaws that were made apparent at interviews, or he could have embellished his experiences in which case I would happily retract my statements. Nobody will really know except OP and the programs OP interviewed with.
In a way, I thought that I was engaging myself in at least a few activities (my intern job, serving as president of a campus organization) that would be considered activities that would improve my chances of matching at least somewhere, but I guess the competition really is that formidable these days. I think that might be one factor the OP isn't taking enough into consideration - it's a competitive process, and so his interview performance was compared to the other applicants' interview performance at every site he interviewed at, and so of course it only makes sense that they'd choose to highly rank the most competitive candidates (in terms of interview performance). It's nothing personal at all.
 
Jan 1, 2020
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That's because you weren't in grief to begin with. You were at best "exploring" residency as you only started looking into it P4 year which is way too late by any modern day standard. OP on the other hand seems to have made investments into applying for residency and fell short. When you invest time, energy and trade opportunity costs for the sake of residency and fall short of course it is going to sting. And before you say it, spending time working on apps and writing essays is not what I'm talking about. It's doing the activities and getting the experiences that will score you points on a residency application before you even apply that counts as true sacrifices.

That being said I could possibly be giving OP too much credit since I am only hearing his side of the story. There could be character or personality flaws that were made apparent at interviews, or he could have embellished his experiences in which case I would happily retract my statements. Nobody will really know except OP and the programs OP interviewed with.
all 4 years of hardwork and sacrifice, boom, roasted and all went down the drain :oops:

Instead of calling it residency match, I guess we should call it residency gamble to better fit the narrative lol.
 
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I already prepared like crazy for the interviews. I had good answers for all the obvious questions that would be asked about my application. I just didn't win the lottery. For whatever reason, all the sites I applied to are ones that put extreme emphasis on clinical questions during the interviews and there's no way to know which sites have what kind of interviews before you apply. Makes no sense to hire people off information they're going to learn during the residency when they've already demonstrated they are very capable on paper and there are much more important things to consider when hiring someone. Was hoping at least one of the programs I applied to would have such a philosophy. I spent a ridiculous amount of time on my applications. I applied to 21 programs and did 6 interviews. I deserved to match. Unfortunately, you will never know why you were ranked the way you were. What I can say is that subjectivity is not fair during any decision-making process and yet it is, unfortunately, a huge part of human interaction. I'm not sinking another 5 months of my life and $1000 in app fees into this next year. I'll assess my options, try to find a job with a better company that doesn't treat their employees like slaves in the meantime and probably maneuver to leave the profession altogether in the long run. What a waste of 8 years of my 20's working myself to death. Why would anyone put up with this profession when I talk to tech workers all the time who have easy, engaging, unstressful jobs with unlimited career potential who don't have preceptors or boomer managers who can extort new grads. I appreciate your input and offer to help, but I was directed down the wrong path by an unhelpful educational system and all my incredible potential I had going into university has now been wasted.

I understand I am being pessimistic, but this is the reality.
You should have realized this in your P1 year. But it's still not too late now.
 
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all 4 years of hardwork and sacrifice, boom, roasted and all went down the drain :oops:

Instead of calling it residency match, I guess we should call it residency gamble to better fit the narrative lol.
Calling it a gamble might not be that inaccurate; several of the top students in my class (the people who everyone else basically assumed would match) didn't match anywhere. It will be interesting to see the applicant stats for this year once they're released in a few weeks.
 
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Calling it a gamble might not be that inaccurate; several of the top students in my class (the people who everyone else basically assumed would match) didn't match anywhere. It will be interesting to see the applicant stats for this year once they're released in a few weeks.
stats don't mean anything. it's not like there is a petition process.
 
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Hels2007

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stats don't mean anything. it's not like there is a petition process.
Stats get you an interview, that's what they are meant to do - the program has to somehow pick your 5-10 onsite candidates out of however many applications they received. After the interview, anything on your CV only matters if interviewers need to choose between those they would rather not hire, but have to play the hand they were dealt. If all the candidates are (perceived to be) 'subpar' but they need to fill a position with a warm body, they have to somehow decide who is the 'lesser evil'. Or if there are clear #1 and #2 but they are obviously good and any program that interviews them will want them, so the program has to rank the rest of the field. Stats aren't important if someone 'clicks', but they are when everyone is seen as 'I would rather not, but I have to, so here comes the elimination process'
 
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Part of being good at communicating is not just conveying the message you intend to, but also saying it in such a way that the intended audience interprets it how you want them to interpret it. Very few people are good at that second part.

Interviews are extremely important. I've never been the interviewer, but I always use the interview as an opportunity to see if I like the facility and the people I'd be working with. Out of all the jobs I've worked, I can always tell if I'd enjoy the job/coworkers/management from the interview. I've taken jobs where I felt like I wouldn't like one of those things and I always turned out to be right. If I'm able to tell that much from an interview, I'm sure the interviewers can tell quite a bit about me from those short interactions. Plus when you think about it, if the interviewer decided that they wouldn't like to work with you based on a single comment, is that somewhere you really want to work? You're just gonna be miserable there so why even waste each other's time?

I know it doesn't seem right, but it always comes down to "it's not what you know, it's who you know". That rings true through pharmacy. Work on your connections, and use them to your advantage. The important part of clubs through school wasn't to be in leadership positions, it was to make connections with your classmates/students from other years. I missed the boat on that one, and I regret it now. I missed out on so many connections I could have made through pharmacy school, but I'm working on it now.

Also doing a residency isn't the only way to get out of retail. Look into other options before getting all worked up over this. Have you looked into picking up a prn hospital position? You were willing to take half pay for a year and put yourself through misery, why not still do that but get paid 4x the salary? Keep working full time in retail (while looking for a better retail position, such as independent) and apply to every single prn hospital position in every state you're licensed in. Even if you're only working 1 day a month, and it's a 5 hour drive in BFE, DO IT!!! It'll get your foot in the door, and eventually you'll be able to transition out of retail.
 

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Some issues that I can't personally prevent. Very likely some immoral individuals and some slander was involved.
This statement says a lot - not trying to pile on, but if you are constantly blaming others for what happened in your life, you are going to have a long road ahead of you. I know someone last year that didn't match on phase 1 (for a PGY2), didn't match on phase 2, didn't match on the scramble, but still was able to find a residency in the post scramble. Obviously he wasn't the strongest candidate, but he put the work in, kept a positive attitude, and stuck with it until he found something for him.

I suggest you do the same, if you just have a pity party for yourself, you aren't doing yourself any favors.
 
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Interviews are extremely important. I've never been the interviewer, but I always use the interview as an opportunity to see if I like the facility and the people I'd be working with. Out of all the jobs I've worked, I can always tell if I'd enjoy the job/coworkers/management from the interview. I've taken jobs where I felt like I wouldn't like one of those things and I always turned out to be right. If I'm able to tell that much from an interview, I'm sure the interviewers can tell quite a bit about me from those short interactions.
It takes about 90 seconds to form an opinion, and the rest of the time is spent trying to either confirm or disprove that first impression. I have only once misread someone badly, that was when I was still in pharmacy school and that was one of the first interviews I had...

As an interviewer, half the time when I ask questions, I am not looking for answers but rather for the thought process behind them and for the attitude - how does the candidate handle stress, unpleasant situations, not knowing something and being put on the spot... The questions someone asks me are also very telling, but most telling is the attitude they project and the overall flow of the interview. The worst are when a candidate just regurgitates prepared responses and acts like they are being interrogated. I usually just wrap up early and put them out of my misery and my office.
 
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Part of being good at communicating is not just conveying the message you intend to, but also saying it in such a way that the intended audience interprets it how you want them to interpret it. Very few people are good at that second part.

Interviews are extremely important. I've never been the interviewer, but I always use the interview as an opportunity to see if I like the facility and the people I'd be working with. Out of all the jobs I've worked, I can always tell if I'd enjoy the job/coworkers/management from the interview. I've taken jobs where I felt like I wouldn't like one of those things and I always turned out to be right. If I'm able to tell that much from an interview, I'm sure the interviewers can tell quite a bit about me from those short interactions. Plus when you think about it, if the interviewer decided that they wouldn't like to work with you based on a single comment, is that somewhere you really want to work? You're just gonna be miserable there so why even waste each other's time?

I know it doesn't seem right, but it always comes down to "it's not what you know, it's who you know". That rings true through pharmacy. Work on your connections, and use them to your advantage. The important part of clubs through school wasn't to be in leadership positions, it was to make connections with your classmates/students from other years. I missed the boat on that one, and I regret it now. I missed out on so many connections I could have made through pharmacy school, but I'm working on it now.

Also doing a residency isn't the only way to get out of retail. Look into other options before getting all worked up over this. Have you looked into picking up a prn hospital position? You were willing to take half pay for a year and put yourself through misery, why not still do that but get paid 4x the salary? Keep working full time in retail (while looking for a better retail position, such as independent) and apply to every single prn hospital position in every state you're licensed in. Even if you're only working 1 day a month, and it's a 5 hour drive in BFE, DO IT!!! It'll get your foot in the door, and eventually you'll be able to transition out of retail.
You literally just described sociopathy. See my below linked Wikipedia article and the referenced studies in the article. Also see my below article on interviewing to see why your intuition when the interviewer is wrong.

I'm a genuine person and not a sociopath. I believe in fairness and justice. I stick to my values no matter what. I'm not going to join a fraternity, organization or make new "friends" to play the game and increase my chances of getting a job over someone more deserving. I'll literally leave the profession or start my own business before I allow that to happen. I keep people in my life who mutually care about and positively enable others. Everyone else who wants a "friendship" just to get something from me can take a hike. And believe me there has been no shortage. But there have also been amazing people. I honestly couldn't imagine living my life having sold myself out just to get an easy job.

Ready for the heavy real talk?

"I used to think that the worst thing in life was to end up alone. It's not. The worst thing in life is to end up with people who make you feel alone".
-Robin Williams from World's Greatest Dad

That's because you weren't in grief to begin with. You were at best "exploring" residency as you only started looking into it P4 year which is way too late by any modern day standard. OP on the other hand seems to have made investments into applying for residency and fell short. When you invest time, energy and trade opportunity costs for the sake of residency and fall short of course it is going to sting. And before you say it, spending time working on apps and writing essays is not what I'm talking about. It's doing the activities and getting the experiences that will score you points on a residency application before you even apply that counts as true sacrifices.

That being said I could possibly be giving OP too much credit since I am only hearing his side of the story. There could be character or personality flaws that were made apparent at interviews, or he could have embellished his experiences in which case I would happily retract my statements. Nobody will really know except OP and the programs OP interviewed with.
I honestly appreciate your unbiased view. You don't know me or experienced the situation and aren't making assumptions. I could be right or wrong from your perspective. Funny how people with the "bad attitudes" about pharmacy are often the most reasonable logical people.

This statement says a lot - not trying to pile on, but if you are constantly blaming others for what happened in your life, you are going to have a long road ahead of you. I know someone last year that didn't match on phase 1 (for a PGY2), didn't match on phase 2, didn't match on the scramble, but still was able to find a residency in the post scramble. Obviously he wasn't the strongest candidate, but he put the work in, kept a positive attitude, and stuck with it until he found something for him.

I suggest you do the same, if you just have a pity party for yourself, you aren't doing yourself any favors.
There is no pity party. Time spent on my applications is a sunk cost. To pursue it further is a waste of time when there are better options out there. Again with the assumptions. I've already said the path forward is running the clock out on retail and transitioning into tech. That is my solution to fix a gigantic problem that I never created. I'm obviously not going to cite and discuss slander online and provide identifying information in the process.

It takes about 90 seconds to form an opinion, and the rest of the time is spent trying to either confirm or disprove that first impression. I have only once misread someone badly, that was when I was still in pharmacy school and that was one of the first interviews I had...

As an interviewer, half the time when I ask questions, I am not looking for answers but rather for the thought process behind them and for the attitude - how does the candidate handle stress, unpleasant situations, not knowing something and being put on the spot... The questions someone asks me are also very telling, but most telling is the attitude they project and the overall flow of the interview. The worst are when a candidate just regurgitates prepared responses and acts like they are being interrogated. I usually just wrap up early and put them out of my misery and my office.
Did you really just say you form an opinion on someone's ability to be a pharmacist within 90 seconds? You literally just confirmed the article I cited that talked about how pointless interviews are (cited again here, written by the Senior Vice President of People Operations at Google). They say more about you than the interviewee. You seem to think very highly of your opinion and your ability to judge people, their worth and their fate. I can assure you that managers in non-horrible industries (tech) are already aware subjective interviews are garbage and they focus on real world skill tests instead. You're aware that literally every student you interview is thinking the same thing right? Residency is extortion, there's a lot of arrogant, hypercritical people here (site/person dependent, but very prevalent, there are some unicorn sites that don't have this), but I have to put up with it temporarily to avoid retail hell, etc. You're literally just picking the best sociopath that lies to you when you select the next clinical pharmacist based on "attitude and overall flow." No wonder sociopaths are statistically so good at getting into management positions and ascending the ladder--they're really good at pretending whatever they need to. There's even a Wikipedia article on this that sums up this concept nicely and cites numerous studies.

Again, the "attitude" is an appropriate response to this horrible profession and the extortion that is occurring between generations. I don't have to care about your subjective opinion of me on this thread and so I'm free to have a "real attitude" and accurately express the reality. Your candidates don't have that luxury and so you live in an echo chamber watching candidates nod their head to whatever it is you want.

It's very telling that the people who have benefitted from the system chalk up the failure of others to a "bad attitude" and then they spend their careers judging and hypercriticizing others. Notice the people who have not benefitted on this thread (based on post likes and responses) are in agreement with me. It's also very telling how many views this thread is getting. I'm not the only one thinking about this.
 
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Rx1992

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I didn't match. I'm devastated. Applied to 21 programs, interviewed at 6, got an email early this morning saying I didn't match. Always been an above-average student, 3.9 gpa, involved in school, etc. Been working retail for the past 4 years and it was good, but has exponentially gotten worse and am looking for a way out of this nightmare. Interviews were hit or miss. Some issues that I can't personally prevent. Very likely some immoral individuals and some slander was involved. You can't control others and their subjective perceptions. I live in a competitive area, but applied to many rural sites as well. Most of my interviews were with competitive sites strangely and was turned down by a lot of the less competitive ones out of the way. Working retail full time while doing residency applications, interviews, etc. is rough and exhausting compared to students blissfully on their "off block" unaware of the slaughter that could await them. Obviously going to be not as up to date with my clinical knowledge as some other candidates, but I had plenty of extra credentials that set me apart. Guess no one wanted to take a chance when they have dozens of other fresh graduates. Don't know what to do now. If feels like an uncontrollable lottery. I put a huge amount of effort and time into my application (not to mention the extortion that is the application fee) over the past few months and it seems like for nothing. I want to be optimistic, but seeing the direction the world has gone where a decade+ of hard work and investing in my career leaves me with a horrible, depressing job I hate and can't escape trying to pay off my "debt to the educational system" makes it hard. And pharmacists aren't alone. At least a bunch of academic administrators, shareholders and ACPE have made bank off me and my generation's hard work trying to escape the massive wealth inequality we've been born into. Watch the stock market tumble 5-10% every day crushing my savings after trying to eke out some financial security in the current environment where previous generations have enjoyed rediculous gains.

We'll see about Phase II, but at best I'll have to uproot my life and work for an organization no one wants to be at slaving away for a year for half pay for the luxury of maybe having a job with them when I graduate. The chance of having a job with the excellent organization I mainly applied to after doing any kind of phase II residency is pretty much zero. Back to work I guess. Just one round of hour cuts away from driving for Uber for minimum wage. Working myself to death to pay off social security and pensions for the boomers (which my generation will not have) hoping I'll be able to afford a house and raise a family by the time I retire (if I retire). No raise again this year, more hours cuts. Barely keeping my high deductible benefits.

Wish everyone the best no matter where this career takes you. I know I'm being negative, but sometimes pessimism is correct and warranted. I know I'll find a path forward.
I would skip Phase 2 and get a full time retail job ASAP and then later apply to PA school. You have an awesome GPA and your retail experience could count as clinical experience. PA school is only two more years. I know you will add debt, but you will have an unusual income to pay off most of your debt in five years. Plus, you would definitely have a higher chance getting matched in a PA residency after PA school of you decide to apply for a PA residency.

I would not recommend to try for a residency next year. Instead take your pharmacy skills and apply them to the front line of patient care. A PA does way more than a clinical pharmacist. If you pursue PA school, your clinical knowledge will be on par and even exceed your competitors who got matched. Your medical knowledge will be more than even your preceptors that doubted you for whatever reason.
PA school beats clinical pharmacy any day and you will never have to worry about hours being cut once you get a job as a PA , and you will get to focus on getting rid of debt.

Also I wanted to add one more thing. PA school can also be done online for basic sciences, so you do not have to relocate. Only for clinical rotations, you would have to relocate.

Also, OP, if you like tech, I would recommend to go for that too, since you said that you wanted to do something in CS. CS is the best white collar job right now compared to any health care job. But if you still want direct patient care to be able to utilize some clinical pharmacy skills, PA is a much better option than trying again for BS pharmacy residency. Not to mention Pharmacy is a Scam said that clinical pharmacists are not even needed during the coronavirus outbreak and are being sent home to verify orders and even if one clinical pharmacist is part of the task force, he or she can only recommend, not treat or prescribe or diagnose anything with respect to coronavirus pandemic
 
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Rx1992

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Another example of why holistic approach to pharmacy residency does not work. And why a standardized exam should be implemented. OP would have matched based on a high standardized test score
 

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Calling it a gamble might not be that inaccurate; several of the top students in my class (the people who everyone else basically assumed would match) didn't match anywhere. It will be interesting to see the applicant stats for this year once they're released in a few weeks.
Were they all Rho Chi? I remember in my class most of the RhoChi students matched except for one who just applied to 1 program
 
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At my school, rho chi was for the top approximately 15% of the class. If it worked the same at your school, then those that weren't in rho chi probably weren't top students.
That was the criteria for Rho Chi membership at my school. I haven't been informed of a complete list who did/didn't match, but I was at least surprised to hear that a few of the Rho Chi students didn't match and ended up applying for phase 2 positions. One of them told me that a few of the programs they applied to were interviewing 30 people or more for 2 spots.
 
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At my school, rho chi was for the top approximately 15% of the class. If it worked the same at your school, then those that weren't in rho chi probably weren't top students.
At my school, the GPA cut off ended up being something ridiculous. Will never understand why you would have a fraternity with some minute fractional gpa difference from a 4.0 as a cut off. Get one or two B's at any point during a few years of college for any reason? You apparent don't deserve to be in the club. A 4.0 + no job experience will never beat a 3.5 and 20+ hours work experience a week. Never.

That was the criteria for Rho Chi membership at my school. I haven't been informed of a complete list who did/didn't match, but I was at least surprised to hear that a few of the Rho Chi students didn't match and ended up applying for phase 2 positions. One of them told me that a few of the programs they applied to were interviewing 30 people or more for 2 spots.
Not sure how many were applying, but in some parts of the country now its common for there to be easily over 100 applicants and 30 interviewees for 1-4 spots. Believe me. I applied all over and talked to many students and pharmacists. It doesn't help that ASHP and the sites themselves purposefully withhold info on the number of applications individual sites receive so as to not discourage people to apply to more sites. Sites like to get as many applicants as possible and ASHP likes billing students for applications. Telling students there are 150 other people applying to the same site would discourage people from applying in the first place. Boy is literally everything ever broken. An economy where everyone is just trying to take as much from everyone else as possible. Including the educational system and organizations who are supposedy supposed to be regulating these things. Brilliant.
 
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Rx1992

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At my school, the GPA cut off ended up being something ridiculous. Will never understand why you would have a fraternity with some minute fractional gpa difference from a 4.0 as a cut off. Get one or two B's at any point during a few years of college for any reason? You apparent don't deserve to be in the club. A 4.0 + no job experience will never beat a 3.5 and 20+ hours work experience a week. Never.



Not sure how many were applying, but in some parts of the country now its common for there to be easily over 100 applicants and 30 interviewees for 1-4 spots. Believe me. I applied all over and talked to many students and pharmacists. It doesn't help that ASHP and the sites themselves purposefully withhold info on the number of applications individual sites receive so as to not discourage people to apply to more sites. Sites like to get as many applicants as possible and ASHP likes billing students for applications. Telling students there are 150 other people applying to the same site would discourage people from applying in the first place. Boy is literally everything ever broken. An economy where everyone is just trying to take as much from everyone else as possible. Including the educational system and organizations who are supposedy supposed to be regulating these things. Brilliant.
I agree. That’s why other health professional residency match rates are way better than the pharmacy residency. I have stated previously that getting a pharmacy residency is harder than getting a medical residency. Even in medicine, there is balance between subjective factors like rotations, research, type of school, but there are objective factors like STEP2 and SHELF exams that help you get matched. Pharmacy residency has way more subjective factors in order to get matched
 
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I agree. That’s why other health professional residency match rates are way better than the pharmacy residency. I have stated previously that getting a pharmacy residency is harder than getting a medical residency. Even in medicine, there is balance between subjective factors like rotations, research, type of school, but there are objective factors like STEP2 and SHELF exams that help you get matched. Pharmacy residency has way more subjective factors in order to get matched
and honestly I think pharmacy residency is total BS lol.
 
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As someone who is about to graduate in 2 months, may I say pharmacy education is probably my worst investment in terms of ROI?

My real estate is up 300k in less than 4 years. Now thanks to coronavirus, I can finally day trade full time at home, and my account is up 16k within last 3 days.

What has three and half years of pharmacy gotten me so far? only freaking fcking debt :rolleyes:

To OP, if I were you, I would be so grateful for not matching anywhere, and I think pharmacy residency is the number 1 bullsh*t and ridiculous crap to ever be part of.
 
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At my school, the GPA cut off ended up being something ridiculous. Will never understand why you would have a fraternity with some minute fractional gpa difference from a 4.0 as a cut off. Get one or two B's at any point during a few years of college for any reason? You apparent don't deserve to be in the club. A 4.0 + no job experience will never beat a 3.5 and 20+ hours work experience a week. Never.



Not sure how many were applying, but in some parts of the country now its common for there to be easily over 100 applicants and 30 interviewees for 1-4 spots. Believe me. I applied all over and talked to many students and pharmacists. It doesn't help that ASHP and the sites themselves purposefully withhold info on the number of applications individual sites receive so as to not discourage people to apply to more sites. Sites like to get as many applicants as possible and ASHP likes billing students for applications. Telling students there are 150 other people applying to the same site would discourage people from applying in the first place. Boy is literally everything ever broken. An economy where everyone is just trying to take as much from everyone else as possible. Including the educational system and organizations who are supposedy supposed to be regulating these things. Brilliant.
Other than residency, pharm GPA has absolutely no relevance in anything else, do you know that? Employers never give a fck~ Grad programs care about your undergrad GPA.
 
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At my school, the GPA cut off ended up being something ridiculous. Will never understand why you would have a fraternity with some minute fractional gpa difference from a 4.0 as a cut off. Get one or two B's at any point during a few years of college for any reason? You apparent don't deserve to be in the club. A 4.0 + no job experience will never beat a 3.5 and 20+ hours work experience a week. Never.



Not sure how many were applying, but in some parts of the country now its common for there to be easily over 100 applicants and 30 interviewees for 1-4 spots. Believe me. I applied all over and talked to many students and pharmacists. It doesn't help that ASHP and the sites themselves purposefully withhold info on the number of applications individual sites receive so as to not discourage people to apply to more sites. Sites like to get as many applicants as possible and ASHP likes billing students for applications. Telling students there are 150 other people applying to the same site would discourage people from applying in the first place. Boy is literally everything ever broken. An economy where everyone is just trying to take as much from everyone else as possible. Including the educational system and organizations who are supposedy supposed to be regulating these things. Brilliant.
I know that at the hospital I worked as an intern at, they interviewed close to 70 candidates for 8 spots (I was one of the interviewees - didn't match), and the RPD told me that the reason they interviewed so many candidates is simply because the saturated state of the job market affords them the opportunity to be uber-picky about who they interview and rank.
 
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As someone who is about to graduate in 2 months, may I say pharmacy education is probably my worst investment in terms of ROI?
I'm close to harboring the same sentiment, although I'm hoping that if I do get accepted to the MCIT program (or some other SWE program), I'll be able to salvage at least some semblance of value from the pharmacy degree by potentially having the opportunity to work with healthcare-related startups.
 
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Rx1992

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I'm close to harboring the same sentiment, although I'm hoping that if I do get accepted to the MCIT program (or some other SWE program), I'll be able to salvage at least some semblance of value from the pharmacy degree by potentially having the opportunity to work with healthcare-related startups.
Or Software developer in Pill pack
 
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that's Amazon SWE essentially
I actually saw a job posting the other day for work-from-home SWEs that was posted by Amazon. So technically, someone could earn a six-figure income working from home as a SWE. I've heard that there are work-from-home opportunities for pharmacists to do remote order verification, but I'm not sure how common those jobs are.
 

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I actually saw a job posting the other day for work-from-home SWEs that was posted by Amazon. So technically, someone could earn a six-figure income working from home as a SWE. I've heard that there are work-from-home opportunities for pharmacists to do remote order verification, but I'm not sure how common those jobs are.
Probably those jobs are up north and the west coast. The remote pharmacy pharmacy jobs. The cases are bad in those areas compared to the Southeast for now
 
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