What's number 1 and 2 for PhD admissions?

  • undergrad GPA

    Votes: 5 7.0%
  • Master's level GPA

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • experience in research labs

    Votes: 56 78.9%
  • conference presentations

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • work experience

    Votes: 1 1.4%
  • GRE scores

    Votes: 18 25.4%
  • ref letters, personal statement, CV

    Votes: 46 64.8%

  • Total voters
    71
  • Poll closed .

FadedC

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Hmm yeah in the end you'll be competing against 100+ people who all have high grades and GRE scores, and good research experience and letters of recomendation. How well you fit into the program will be the thing that determines acceptance or rejection (at least in a clinical phd program).
 

Markp

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+1 on the personal statement, it is possibly the single most malleable item that can differentiate you from your competition.

Mark
 

krisrox

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As far as getting from the interview stage to getting an actual acceptance, I think there's a lot of luck involved, also...
 

McClinas

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As far as getting from the interview stage to getting an actual acceptance, I think there's a lot of luck involved, also...
I agree with the previous posters. I consider GRE and GPA to be prerequisites to get serious attention from admission committees. But, these scores alone won't get you in. They are necessary, but not sufficient. That's where letters, CV, personal statement, experiences, and a healthy dose of luck can push you over the top.
 
Jan 29, 2010
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I hate to say this, but -if- you happen to work for a supervisor with reputation, networking can really get you places. Not just in terms of recommendation letters. I know students who were almost all but guaranteed admission (assuming they don't bomb their interviews) based on their experience working with some 'star players' in the field of clin psych research. Doesn't mean you can't get in without connections, but if you can network, don't be shy about tapping into your resources.
 

Markp

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I hate to say this, but -if- you happen to work for a supervisor with reputation, networking can really get you places. Not just in terms of recommendation letters. I know students who were almost all but guaranteed admission (assuming they don't bomb their interviews) based on their experience working with some 'star players' in the field of clin psych research. Doesn't mean you can't get in without connections, but if you can network, don't be shy about tapping into your resources.
And the further you move along, the more important these connections become.

Mark
 
Apr 5, 2010
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Teo and Mark, care to explain what types of changes you made from round 1 of your personal statements to round 2 that got you increased attention from committees?
 

Markp

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Teo and Mark, care to explain what types of changes you made from round 1 of your personal statements to round 2 that got you increased attention from committees?

I was more open about what I wanted from the programs... and less worried about what they wanted. I think that being a bit more open about what I wanted made my statement a better statement.

Mark
 

FadedC

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What do you mean by luck?
Well in many cases your going to be competing against a large number of other students who have just as impressive backgrounds as you. You may be chosen because your POI is thinking of expanding his research into an area you just happen to have some experience in, because you fill a certain demographic need for the school, because you remind someone of themselves as a student, or any number of things you can't predict going in.
 

twilson

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Well in many cases your going to be competing against a large number of other students who have just as impressive backgrounds as you. You may be chosen because your POI is thinking of expanding his research into an area you just happen to have some experience in, because you fill a certain demographic need for the school, because you remind someone of themselves as a student, or any number of things you can't predict going in.
Definitely. I know one professor who switches every year what kind of student they will be looking for between their two lines of research. One year they are looking for people research in A and the next people for research in B.
 

LS821

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Mar 9, 2010
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thanks for the great input everyone

I'm definitely gaining awesome experiences - research, clinical, practicum- in my Master's program that I believe will help my chances. I am worried about perfecting my personal statement and a couple of B's that may bring my GPA down.