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PhD Programs that accept MCAT in place of GRE

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bassmint03

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I've finally made the decision to pursue a Biomedical PhD. I have already taken the MCAT with a decent score and would like to begin a PhD program this coming fall. Most programs I am finding have deadlines in less than 2 months and require the GRE (I don't have the time to fit in studying) so I am looking for a program that will accept my MCAT in place of the GRE. Google hasn't been too helpful. Any advice would be great. Thanks!
 

QofQuimica

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Not aware of any grad school programs that allow substitution of the MCAT for the GRE, but you could always ask at programs you're interested in applying to.

How did you do on your SAT? If you're a generally good test-taker, you can just take the GRE cold. That's what I did. I got about the same score on both of those tests after taking them both cold. (We didn't do the whole test prep thing in the late 80s/early 90s when I was in high school.) If you have to take a subject test, that might be tougher to do cold if you haven't seen the material in a while. But if you're fresh out of college and you majored in the same subject, it probably won't be a huge obstacle for you to achieve a decent score even on a subject test. I didn't study for the chemistry subject test, but I scored highly enough on the ACS UG exam and the general GRE that they didn't even make me take it.

If you're not a naturally good test-taker, then studying and practice is not optional. If you can't squeeze any studying in over the next 1-2 months, you should postpone your app until next semester so that you have time to prepare properly. One good thing about grad school is that, unlike med school, it's entirely possible to start in January instead of in August at many institutions. So you don't necessarily have to sit out for an entire year if you can't be ready to start in August. You can just apply to start the following semester instead.
 

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    I've seen very few grad programs where you can substitute the MCAT for the GRE. Usually, ghe one's that do are dual degree type programs like the MPH program will lets med students or docs use the MCAT instead.

    That said, as noted above, if you're a decent test taker you might not need to study much for the GRE at all. I mostly needed to just brush up on some math I hadn't used in awhile.
     

    Naruhodo

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    I'd say most PhD programs don't weight the GRE heavily at all. Research is what you'll be doing, so evidence that you can do research and letters from people who speak to that are the most important things. They'll even overlook a low grade or two given you have the right credentials otherwise. It never hurts to call a few PhD programs to see if they are flexible on the GRE requirement. I know for a fact that my PhD program did not require it because they felt it was a hurdle that kept some of the most talented foreign students (often with multiple offers in their home countries) from applying. But on the website of course it said the GRE was required, so you did have to actually show interest and ask them directly. Unfortunately, the deadline to apply to many programs (including mine) has passed already, but if anyone is interested for next year feel free to message me.
     
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