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Phlebotomist job opportunity..

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KornKobs

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Ok, there is a 3 day phleb class coming to my city, costs about $500 and then I would be certified. I've been looking through other hospital jobs and I'm not sure if I should stay in my position now..or go for the phlebotomist job. It seems like doing the phleb would look better than what I do now..(pt. equip./messenger) which involves taking up orders (alaris pumps/epidurals/compressor pumps, etc.) and also delivery of pharmacy to diff. floors and take specimen to labs. That's basically all I do. It's not at all a challenge, sched. works great with my school, love the people..but i feel that it looks like I could do something more challenging. What do you all think..should I stay where I'm at or go for the phleb job..if I even get one?

And another question, if I decide to stay where I'm at, what type of clinical experience can I get otherwise? Other than shadowing a physician? :confused:

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Seems rather expensive – you could probably become a CPR instructor for a lot cheaper than that. I don’t think that a med school would look at a phleb any better – remember the main reason med schools want you to get clinical experience is so you know what doctors do. But knowing how to draw blood is a good skill to have and it may be more interesting.
 
kenmc3 said:
Seems rather expensive – you could probably become a CPR instructor for a lot cheaper than that. I don’t think that a med school would look at a phleb any better – remember the main reason med schools want you to get clinical experience is so you know what doctors do. But knowing how to draw blood is a good skill to have and it may be more interesting.

+1

You need two types of experience: 1) smelling patients, 2) smelling doctors. ;)

If you've shadowed and you're getting patient contact with your current job then being a phlebotomist isn't going to improve your application much if any.

Now, if it's something you're interested in doing because it sounds cool or you're looking for a change of pace then go for it.
 
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Are you sure you need to take the class for a job? I'm a medical assistant and my office just trains everyone on the job. Way cheaper. I can't imagine learning to draw blood being worth that much, it's largely a matter of practice and basic hand-eye coordination. And I guess memorizing which tube to use for what, but it's really not that complicated. I mean, go ahead if they require it for a job you're interested in, but don't waste your money if it's not necessary.
 
wait... "phlebotomist" isn't exactly a word in my vocabulary. it's a job where all u do is take blood??
 
It also depends on "who's" giving the workshop. I was going to do a similar thing then I looked into the company and it was a certificate from them. Not accepted by anyone else. Although it does give you experience and if you have the money to throw around it might help you. Why don't you call some jobs that are hiring phebl. and ask them what they think?
 
If you can get a job as a phlebotomist then go for it. I did it for a year and it was great clinical experience. I got to know the whole hospital and all kinds of docs, nurses, etc... You have a lot of contact with patients and families and where I worked I would also get to draw during traumas so it was cool. If you can get a job in a hospital then it can be challenging too because many of the patients have bad veins from being stuck so many times and you have to get good at finding the right one!
 
According to the ASCP, you cannot be certified as a phlebotomist until you've at least had 6 months of experience and a certain number of pokes under your belt. If they tell you differently they're wording it funny or lying to you about what certification really means.

Along with the experience you also must have taken the certification exam, which they don't just hand out to people.
 
At my med school we had a 1 hour lecture and then we practiced on each other - we needed to get 5 sticks in order to be qualified to do it on real patients. Then again, as medical students we have special privileges that we don’t need to be certified to touch patients. I'm sure that hospitals have stricter rules and requirements for people walking off the street looking for a job as a phlebotomist.
 
Duchess742 said:
wait... "phlebotomist" isn't exactly a word in my vocabulary. it's a job where all u do is take blood??

Pretty much, as far as I understand
 
KornKobs said:
Ok, there is a 3 day phleb class coming to my city, costs about $500 and then I would be certified. I've been looking through other hospital jobs and I'm not sure if I should stay in my position now..or go for the phlebotomist job. It seems like doing the phleb would look better than what I do now..(pt. equip./messenger) which involves taking up orders (alaris pumps/epidurals/compressor pumps, etc.) and also delivery of pharmacy to diff. floors and take specimen to labs. That's basically all I do. It's not at all a challenge, sched. works great with my school, love the people..but i feel that it looks like I could do something more challenging. What do you all think..should I stay where I'm at or go for the phleb job..if I even get one?

And another question, if I decide to stay where I'm at, what type of clinical experience can I get otherwise? Other than shadowing a physician? :confused:

How many years do you have left of school? I have heard of academic medical centers paying for your education if you could work phleb for them for at least a year, then allowing you to get NCA or ASCP certified free of cost. Example: MAYO

Try to get some medical center to pay for your education. Being a phlebotomist is a really good way to see what medicine is all about and if its the best fit for you. Also, you will make more $$$ drawing blood and have better connections when it comes to LOR's.

Where do you currently live?
 
Avalanche21 said:
Pretty much, as far as I understand

that sounds like a terrible job!! plus, patients totally hate you! drawing blood will prob be my least favorite part of med school!
 
KornKobs said:
Ok, there is a 3 day phleb class coming to my city, costs about $500 and then I would be certified. I've been looking through other hospital jobs and I'm not sure if I should stay in my position now..or go for the phlebotomist job. It seems like doing the phleb would look better than what I do now..(pt. equip./messenger) which involves taking up orders (alaris pumps/epidurals/compressor pumps, etc.) and also delivery of pharmacy to diff. floors and take specimen to labs. That's basically all I do. It's not at all a challenge, sched. works great with my school, love the people..but i feel that it looks like I could do something more challenging. What do you all think..should I stay where I'm at or go for the phleb job..if I even get one?

And another question, if I decide to stay where I'm at, what type of clinical experience can I get otherwise? Other than shadowing a physician? :confused:

For sure, do it!
 
Duchess742 said:
that sounds like a terrible job!! plus, patients totally hate you! drawing blood will prob be my least favorite part of med school!

It can actually be really satisfying when it goes well. I had one guy (middle aged) that was so busy looking away and wincing that he didn't notice I had done everything. He finally turned his head and barked "When are you going to do it?" when I was taking the tourniquet off and pulling out the needle. He didn't believe I was done until I showed him the tube of blood.
Or sometimes when they know they're a hard draw they're extremely grateful when it goes smoothly. The first time a patient said, "Wow, you can draw my blood anytime" it totally made my entire week.

Obviously, it wouldn't be a satisying long term occupation, but as a premed student it's about as close to actually doing a procedure as most of us can get (at least without a whole lot of extra training to be an EMT or something).
 
HelenaP said:
...

Obviously, it wouldn't be a satisying long term occupation, but as a premed student it's about as close to actually doing a procedure as most of us can get (at least without a whole lot of extra training to be an EMT or something).

Careful! Many people have made it a satisfying long term occupation. It may not be for you, or for many of us here, but don't make it seem as if it couldn't be.
 
HelenaP said:
It can actually be really satisfying when it goes well. I had one guy (middle aged) that was so busy looking away and wincing that he didn't notice I had done everything. He finally turned his head and barked "When are you going to do it?" when I was taking the tourniquet off and pulling out the needle. He didn't believe I was done until I showed him the tube of blood.
Or sometimes when they know they're a hard draw they're extremely grateful when it goes smoothly. The first time a patient said, "Wow, you can draw my blood anytime" it totally made my entire week.

Obviously, it wouldn't be a satisying long term occupation, but as a premed student it's about as close to actually doing a procedure as most of us can get (at least without a whole lot of extra training to be an EMT or something).

ok you need to come work in the penn health system. next time i need to get blood drawn, i'm calling you!
 
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