Physical Fitness During Medical School

tco

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I worked really hard last year to get into the best shape that I've been in my life, and I'm afraid I'll lose it next year as an MS-I. If I plan it into my schedule, will I have time for 1 hour of exercise per day throughout most non-test weeks? Will that be too big of a sacrifice to my study time, or will it be a smart thing to do to keep me fresh? I have a Bowflex, so on most days, I figure that I can wake up early, workout, and start my morning routine. I won't even have to drive to a fitness center.

I've also looked into taking Aikido during two nights of the week. It would take place of my usual exercise on those days.

What is in your daily routine to keep you in shape during medical school?
 
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If I plan it into my schedule, will I have time for 1 hour of exercise per day throughout most non-test weeks?

Yes, absolutely.

Will that be too big of a sacrifice to my study time, or will it be a smart thing to do to keep me fresh?

Smart thing to do to keep you fresh.

Hope that sets your mind at ease. :D
 
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ZagDoc

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You have all the time you could want or need the first 2 years depending on your motivation and planning. 30-45 minutes a day? You're fine.

3rd year and beyond - you take what you can get. Some rotations that's plenty of time, others, not so much.
 

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I worked really hard last year to get into the best shape that I've been in my life, and I'm afraid I'll lose it next year as an MS-I. If I plan it into my schedule, will I have time for 1 hour of exercise per day throughout most non-test weeks? Will that be too big of a sacrifice to my study time, or will it be a smart thing to do to keep me fresh? I have a Bowflex, so on most days, I figure that I can wake up early, workout, and start my morning routine. I won't even have to drive to a fitness center.

I've also looked into taking Aikido during two nights of the week. It would take place of my usual exercise on those days.

What is in your daily routine to keep you in shape during medical school?

Dude. You can definitely stay in shape as long as you're organized.
 
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tco

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You have all the time you could want or need the first 2 years depending on your motivation and planning. 30-45 minutes a day? You're fine.

3rd year and beyond - you take what you can get. Some rotations that's plenty of time, others, not so much.

I figured as much.

I've always understood that the first year is the hardest in terms of transitioning and getting "what it takes." The third year is the most time consuming and challenging and fourth year feels like a vacation.

I'm not exactly sure what I want to do with my life, but I'm leaning towards a surgery specialty. If I want to do something uberhypercompetitive like neuro, I need to learn to organize my life anyway, so I may as well start now.
 

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I worked really hard last year to get into the best shape that I've been in my life, and I'm afraid I'll lose it next year as an MS-I. If I plan it into my schedule, will I have time for 1 hour of exercise per day throughout most non-test weeks? Will that be too big of a sacrifice to my study time, or will it be a smart thing to do to keep me fresh? I have a Bowflex, so on most days, I figure that I can wake up early, workout, and start my morning routine. I won't even have to drive to a fitness center.

I've also looked into taking Aikido during two nights of the week. It would take place of my usual exercise on those days.

What is in your daily routine to keep you in shape during medical school?

MS1's have a ton of free time. You'll have time to work out, watch movies, play your XBox, and go to clubs on weekends.
 

tco

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MS1's have a ton of free time. You'll have time to work out, watch movies, play your XBox, and go to clubs on weekends.

I'm sure that, looking back, it seems like MSI was a cakewalk and you had tons of free time. Just like, for me looking back to my first couple years of undergrad, it seemed like a joke and I had tons of free time.

In reality, those years were just as hard as we have recently faced, and every bit as time consuming. Time seems to alter our memory. We block out the bad memories, and typically only remember the good ones.

I hope you're right, though! :)
 
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TopSecret

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I'm sure that, looking back, it seems like MSI was a cakewalk and you had tons of free time. Just like, for me looking back to my first couple years of undergrad, it seemed like a joke and I had tons of free time.

In reality, those years were just as hard as we have recently faced, and every bit as time consuming. Time seems to alter our memory. We block out the bad memories, and typically only remember the good ones.

I hope you're right, though! :)

It was my MS1 experience. It was good. After my MS2 year I learned to skydive.
 

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Maybe you're just the real-life version of Greg House.

Brilliance that knows no intellectual bounds.

MS1 wasn't too bad for me either, and I'm about as a far from being House as possible. It wasn't a vaction or anything, but definitely averaging 60 hrs/week or less (all work & classes included) to keep above the class average. That's way more free time than I had in undergrad. Also I have basically no other obligations. In undergrad even if I actually finished my work there were always a hundred or so clubs and activities that needed my attention. In medical school I finish studying and don't have a single other thing to do. I guess the lesson here is don't be that guy who signs up to be president of 10 different clubs and then runs for student government in medical school. There's no reason for it.

In any event I remember my undergrad as being pretty tiring and stressful (though fun and memorable), and I remember HS as being completely sleepless and totally miserable (and memorable on in the way a poop sandwich is memorable), so I don't think I'm just scabbing over memories.
 

tco

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Nah, I just get bored more easily. It's why I took up sailing during my internship and got to fly a plane as well in a mock dogfight over San Diego. It was really fun.

One of my goals within the next few years of my life is to get my pilots license. I love to fly, and eventually hope to own a WWII warbird...

Anyway, we're straying from the topic!
 
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I'm in classes right now and training for a strongman. All about efficiency. I squander a ton of time and I still can get to the gym and pull my weighted sled afterwards. I have actually gained about 5 pounds of mass since I began this summer. Every lift has gone up except for my squat, but that is because my knee is jacked and I need to rest it.
 

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One of my goals within the next few years of my life is to get my pilots license. I love to fly, and eventually hope to own a WWII warbird...

Anyway, we're straying from the topic!

Pilots license? I didn't need one. It was one of those adventure vacations. You can do it on a weekend. I recommend it. It's really fun.

www.aircombat.com
 

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I'm in classes right now and training for a strongman. All about efficiency. I squander a ton of time and I still can get to the gym and pull my weighted sled afterwards. I have actually gained about 5 pounds of mass since I began this summer. Every lift has gone up except for my squat, but that is because my knee is jacked and I need to rest it.

ditto. I'm putting mass on while in internship. 70+ hour weeks.

You waste a lot of time during the day. Find it.

Check out the bodybuilding in med school and the marathon in med school threads.
 
I worked really hard last year to get into the best shape that I've been in my life, and I'm afraid I'll lose it next year as an MS-I. If I plan it into my schedule, will I have time for 1 hour of exercise per day throughout most non-test weeks? Will that be too big of a sacrifice to my study time, or will it be a smart thing to do to keep me fresh? I have a Bowflex, so on most days, I figure that I can wake up early, workout, and start my morning routine. I won't even have to drive to a fitness center.

I've also looked into taking Aikido during two nights of the week. It would take place of my usual exercise on those days.

What is in your daily routine to keep you in shape during medical school?

You may have more time than you think if you look at doing some non- traditional things like running stairs for cardio (on your lunch hour) or slipping into a close by gym (join one close to campus) when you have some "down time" during the day. My medical school had an outstanding fitness/aquatic center that was 5 minutes away and was quite handy for stress relief. (I wish I had taken advantage of it more often).

Staying in the best condition that you can muster, makes everything go better. Once you scout around and get a routine (both study and work-out) you will know what I mean. During residency, working out saved me.
 

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You may have more time than you think if you look at doing some non- traditional things like running stairs for cardio (on your lunch hour) or slipping into a close by gym (join one close to campus) when you have some "down time" during the day. My medical school had an outstanding fitness/aquatic center that was 5 minutes away and was quite handy for stress relief. (I wish I had taken advantage of it more often).

Staying in the best condition that you can muster, makes everything go better. Once you scout around and get a routine (both study and work-out) you will know what I mean. During residency, working out saved me.
Just don't come back to class all sweaty and with major BO.
 
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pilotjoe

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One of my goals within the next few years of my life is to get my pilots license. I love to fly, and eventually hope to own a WWII warbird...

Anyway, we're straying from the topic!

I have been into flying since I was nine. I started my pilot's license training at 14 and finished up when I was 18 in my first semester of undergrad. I haven't logged many hours since I got my license (not current anymore :cryi:) because it is expensive to maintain when you have a wife and kid. Anyway, I plan on renewing and getting my IFR when I start residency! Getting my license was one of the best decisions I have ever made. Ditto on the warbird, except I want a Sopwith.
 

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I have been into flying since I was nine. I started my pilot's license training at 14 and finished up when I was 18 in my first semester of undergrad. I haven't logged many hours since I got my license (not current anymore :cryi:) because it is expensive to maintain when you have a wife and kid. Anyway, I plan on renewing and getting my IFR when I start residency! Getting my license was one of the best decisions I have ever made. Ditto on the warbird, except I want a Sopwith.
Sweet 5 year old bump bro
 
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MS-1, plenty of my classmates have been able to work out regularly this year. There's some harder blocks/weeks, especially before exams, where some folks slipped, but those who make it a priority seemed to have maintained it pretty well overall. If exercise is a priority, I certainly encourage keeping it. :)

Oops saw the OP date. Well, I still support exercise in school. :D
 
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tco

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Wow, the memories.

I worked really hard last year to get into the best shape that I've been in my life, and I'm afraid I'll lose it next year as an MS-I. If I plan it into my schedule, will I have time for 1 hour of exercise per day throughout most non-test weeks? Will that be too big of a sacrifice to my study time, or will it be a smart thing to do to keep me fresh? I have a Bowflex, so on most days, I figure that I can wake up early, workout, and start my morning routine. I won't even have to drive to a fitness center.

I've also looked into taking Aikido during two nights of the week. It would take place of my usual exercise on those days.

What is in your daily routine to keep you in shape during medical school?

Yeah, I didn't even drive to a fitness center. The Bowflex was crap. I may as well have lifted gallon jugs of milk. Or tubs of ice cream...Which I did.

I figured as much.

I've always understood that the first year is the hardest in terms of transitioning and getting "what it takes." The third year is the most time consuming and challenging and fourth year feels like a vacation.

I'm not exactly sure what I want to do with my life, but I'm leaning towards a surgery specialty. If I want to do something uberhypercompetitive like neuro, I need to learn to organize my life anyway, so I may as well start now.


I'm amazed at how much I knew about medical school before I actually went through it. Probably more than I know now that I've been through it.

Radiology --> Interventional radiology, for the record.

I'm sure that, looking back, it seems like MSI was a cakewalk and you had tons of free time. Just like, for me looking back to my first couple years of undergrad, it seemed like a joke and I had tons of free time.

In reality, those years were just as hard as we have recently faced, and every bit as time consuming. Time seems to alter our memory. We block out the bad memories, and typically only remember the good ones.

I hope you're right, though! :)

Yep, pretty much.

This is hilarious. @tco, I totally thought you were trolling when I read this post - then realized it's 5 years old. So, how's that physical fitness going? ;)

HOW 'BOUT I SHOW YOU HOW FIT DIS CORE IS?!
 
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DermViser

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I have been into flying since I was nine. I started my pilot's license training at 14 and finished up when I was 18 in my first semester of undergrad. I haven't logged many hours since I got my license (not current anymore :cryi:) because it is expensive to maintain when you have a wife and kid. Anyway, I plan on renewing and getting my IFR when I start residency! Getting my license was one of the best decisions I have ever made. Ditto on the warbird, except I want a Sopwith.
Thank you for bumping up a 5 year old thread. The OP is no a resident. Pretty sure he's figured out about that pilot's license thing.
 
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What is in your daily routine to keep you in shape during medical school?

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