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Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation vs. Physical Therapy

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doctosan

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I was reading some stuff on PM&R, and it sounds a lot like Physical Therapy....am I missing something? (yes I know that PM&R docs can prescribe medicine and PTs cannot)
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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bump~~~~~~:confused::confused::confused:

A 2 year bump?


Umm, I guess it's aken to the relationship of an Psychologist and Psychiatrist, Optometrist and Ophthalmologist, etc. The PM&R is trained more broadly and knows a lot more about prescribing treatments and therapy plans and the PTs do assist or do some parts of the treatments.
 

music2doc

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A 2 year bump?


Umm, I guess it's aken to the relationship of an Psychologist and Psychiatrist, Optometrist and Ophthalmologist, etc. The PM&R is trained more broadly and knows a lot more about prescribing treatments and therapy plans and the PTs do assist or do some parts of the treatments.

Wow...old bump, haha! Anyway... most of the PM&R docs I know work in-pt and, in conjunction with the unit manager, oversee the PTs as well as perform all med management. In an OP setting, they would [likely] be less involved with pt care since OP PT is generally less intensive and does not require ongoing med mgmt (except by the PCP). IP settings require the PM&R doc to round on all pts and provide intensive medical support as needed.
 
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Physiatrists, or rehabilitation physicians, are nerve, muscle, and bone experts who treat injuries or illnesses that affect how you move

Rehabilitation physicians are medical doctors who have completed training in the medical specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R). Specifically, rehabilitation physicians:

Diagnose and treat pain
Restore maximum function lost through injury, illness or disabling conditions
Treat the whole person, not just the problem area
Lead a team of medical professionals
Provide non-surgical treatments
Explain your medical problems and treatment/prevention plan

The job of a rehabilitation physician is to treat any disability resulting from disease or injury, from sore shoulders to spinal cord injuries. The focus is on the development of a comprehensive program for putting the pieces of a person's life back together after injury or disease – without surgery.

Rehabilitation physicians take the time needed to accurately pinpoint the source of an ailment. They then design a treatment plan that can be carried out by the patients themselves or with the help of the rehabilitation physician's medical team. This medical team might include other physicians and health professionals, such as neurologists, orthopedic surgeons, and physical therapists. By providing an appropriate treatment plan, rehabilitation physicians help patients stay as active as possible at any age. Their broad medical expertise allows them to treat disabling conditions throughout a person's lifetime.

http://www.aapmr.org/patients/aboutpmr/Pages/physiatrist.aspx


Physical therapists typically do the following:

Diagnose patients' dysfunctional movements by watching them stand or walk and by listening to their concerns, among other methods
Set up a plan for their patients, outlining the patient's goals and the planned treatments
Use exercises, stretching maneuvers, hands-on therapy, and equipment to ease patients' pain and to help them increase their ability to move
Evaluate a patient's progress, modifying a treatment plan and trying new treatments as needed
Educate patients and their families about what to expect during recovery from injury and illness and how best to cope with what happens

Physical therapists provide care to people of all ages who have functional problems resulting from back and neck injuries; sprains, strains, and fractures; arthritis; amputations; stroke; birth conditions, such as cerebral palsy; injuries related to work and sports; and other conditions.

http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Physical-therapists.htm#tab-2
 

TheMightySmiter

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Physiatrists oversee a patient's rehab process, prescribe treatments, and help determine the patient's eventual goal and progress towards that goal. Physical therapists do hands-on exercises to help the patient recover movement. The job of the PT is much more specific and has more direct patient contact than that of a physiatrist.
 
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