Planning for med school

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by Colbalt6, Oct 2, 2001.

  1. Colbalt6

    Colbalt6 Junior Member

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    I've decided to become a doctor if at all possible, after putting it off because I work with so many kids who are not receiving the care they need because they are poor/don't have enough insurance etc.

    I've gotten very excited about osteopathic medicine, after changing insurance and finding a great DO, and as corny as it might sound, reading KCOM's website.

    I have several question. First based on the following information about me how realistic are my chances of getting into medical school? Secondly, should I repeat the classes I took at a community college?

    I'm 24 years old and I won't graduate until May 2003. So I am not a traditional student. I work as a psych tech in a hospital and I am a psych major with a 3.7 non science GPA. I have a 3.4 science GPA and am a chemistry minor. This is the best I can do, so I won't be able to pull it up much, but looking at my upcoming courses, it will not drop at all.

    I have excellent community service record, a congressional medal of recognition for humanitian work I did, citation from two citys for community service, and glowing recomendations from a head nurse, a psychologist, and an MD surgeon, as well as the head of a rescue team I work under. I will have a good but not overly personal recomendation from a DO who is my doctor. I don't have the time to shadow under a DO because it would ahve to be without pay and I cannot afford to.

    I took a year of physics (specified as "pre-med" or for biology majors in the course description) from a community college which offers a RN nursing program, thinking that their science and math courses would be acceptable. I also took anatomy and physiology, again from their "allied health program" there. I got A's. Should I retake them? It would set me back an intire year. Or should I apply and explain as a non traditional student who has to balance many hours of work (I work 45+ hours and go to school 18 hour, but will not have to work during medical school at all), I took them in the summer when I could and they were avaible, and I felt they provided me with the mastery I needed to succeed in medical school because higher standards this community college maintains in the allied health program? Or does that just sound lame?

    Also assuming I get an interview, what I want to do sounds very clique. I want to work with under privaledged area, either rural or inter-city, especially with children. Is that going to sound too much like a line or with my community service dating back though high school to support it would that be ok?

    Thanks for any and all help. Sorry this si so long! Since I am I psych major, I don't have a pre-med advisor and my advisor had never heard of a "DO" or KCOM :-( I will be applying to all 18 COM and 10 Allopathic medical school, just in case.

    Lisa
     
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  3. Qi Whiz

    Qi Whiz Member

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    Lisa, sounds good to me! From what I've learned from reading these boards and from talking to DOs, interest in osteopathy is at least as important as grades. Your history seems very interesting- experience and work/school circumstances. Most of the schools are fine with community college grades. One (TUCOM) told me those courses are discouraged, but others (KCOM, DMU) didn't blink. All of these issues have been addressed from multiple points of view here, so you may find it interesting to search through the boards. Also be aware that you can call admissions offices for advice. GO FOR IT!
     
  4. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc

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    For starters, there are 19 DO programs out there, not 18.your community service and enthusiasm will get you a long way. most DO schools don't mind if you took classes at a community college(while most MD programs do).if you apply to several DO schools with your grades and background, you will get in to at least 1 if your mcat is reasonable. don't bother applying to the MD programs. if you want to be a DO apply only to those programs, it looks better to the admissions folks who will know and will ask you if you applied non-DO.if you apply to both it makes it look like being a DO is not the most important aspect of becoming a physician for you.good luck
     
  5. innerpower

    innerpower Senior Member

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    As far as shadowing a D.O., it doesn't have to be a 9-5, M~F, thing.

    It could be as short as a couple hour, one time deal if you want.

    Mine was about 4 hour, one day thing.

    Of course, it would be more beneficial to have shadowed a D.O. for a longer time, but I am just letting you know that it doesn't have to be.

    If I were you, I would definitely shadow a D.O. 'cause most if not all do weigh that into their decision making.

    Good Luck!
     
  6. Colbalt6

    Colbalt6 Junior Member

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    Thank you all.

    I do truly realize that there are 19 school -- even budgeted for it I swear ;-)-- Not a great start, huh? I actually can name them all and have their addresses in my outlook!

    I was unaware that school know who else you applied to (should I apply to Harvard to look good? LOL). I figured if all else failed I'd go to allopathic school -- not because I think they are less just because I am SO pleased with the osteopathic principles etc. (ooo I sound *gag* so clique)

    Thank you SO much for the "shadowing" advice. I truly thought it had to be one's job. I will look into finding someone -- ANYONE! to take me on! LOL

    Thank you for the suggestion on searching the boards. I finally figured out how to do it -- 'fraid I'm not so great on computers. ;-) SO for asking a rather redunant question.

    Thanks again,
    Lisa
     
  7. Dr. Evil

    Dr. Evil Member

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    Just a couple of things. First, go ahead and apply to a couple of MD schools if you like (your state school(s) would be a good choice). No DO program will really frown unless you apply to about ten MD schools and one DO. However, if your heart is set on osteopathy, save yourself the money. You will get a spot in a DO class with your credentials (unless of course you scored about a 19 on your MCAT or say "A.T. who?" during your interview).

    Next is the issue of the number of schools to which you're applying. There is no need to apply to all 19, and some schools may even be put off by this. Even if you were awarded interviews at all of them, you could not attend every one.

    First, there is a money issue. I personally attended five interviews, and after plane fare, rental car, hotel, etc., it became very expensive. This is not inluding the AACOMAS fees or the secondary application fees. So unless you have a large amount of cash that's burning a hole in your pocket, save your money. You'll need it.

    Then, you have to give careful consideration to your chances of being accepted to certain schools. For example, Texas, Michigan, and West Virginia show preference to state residents, and may only consider accepting you if you have outstanding credentials (ie. scores of 12 or better on your MCAT sections). Your best bet is to apply to your state school (if you have one and they give your residents preference) and then some of the schools like PCOM, Des Moines, and UHS that have a large class size with a good percentage of out-of-state students. You have a better chance of getting into Nova than you do Oklahoma, unless of course you're an Oklahoma resident.

    Hope this is helpful, and good luck.
     
  8. AthensfromCols

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    Lisa,

    You sound as untraditional in your approach to becoming a future DO as me, and I am currently in my first year DO student.

    I took lots of classes at community colleges, never shadowed a doctor, and actually said much of what you would say in my interviews. I think DO schools look for people with compassion and sincerity and experience. Your dedication to the field of medicine and humanitarianism will take you far. As long as you maintain your current GPA and fair okay on the MCATs, you will be calling your self "doc" before you know it.

    Good luck and I hope this helped a little!
     

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