MaybeMD

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I am thinking about playing baseball, but I don't want to do it if it will hurt my chances of getting into medical school. But I will do it if adcoms look more favorably at an applicant that can juggle sports and still keep good grades. Let me know all you can, especially from those of you that did play sports in your undergraduate school.
 

BradMcC17

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I'm a senior in undergrad and I've been playing football all 4 years. I think schools look favorably on sports with its many positive aspects (teamwork, hard work, performing under pressure). But with football it was easier because I hardly missed class cuz the games were always on Sat. But with baseball your going to have games during the week. Thats a hard decision, but I'd say play and have fun. Live up and experience undergrad.
 

Cydney Foote

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The vast majority of our residents and fellows at UW had been very active in sports (both team sports and individual activities like running, swimming, etc.) in college. I think that demonstrating strong outside interests (be it baseball, drama, music, etc.) while maintaining a very good GPA tells the adcomm that you are a balanced human being, not just an automaton who does more than attend classes and study. It'll also give you good material for your essays. However, keeping up your GPA is essential. If that starts to slip because of your athletic activities, you might want to consider changing to a sport that doesn't take such a toll on your academics.
 
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dr kevin40

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playing sports team won't really help your med school application significanlty (while it does help for colleges)

here's why

being a top athlete in a particular sport in HS, and applyng for college, means u might contribute something positive to the schools athletic team. u'll be recruited by their athletic dept, which means an almost shoe-in.

however, even if say u were ranked in the top 10 of a sport say.... college tennis div I? well taht's great u were ranked so high, but med schools don't have sports teams. you won't help out the med school's profile by being a top collegiate athlete.

that's y it won't help that much. it'd prob help a little tho.
 

souljah1

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Originally posted by dr kevin40
playing sports team won't really help your med school application significanlty (while it does help for colleges)

here's why

being a top athlete in a particular sport in HS, and applyng for college, means u might contribute something positive to the schools athletic team. u'll be recruited by their athletic dept, which means an almost shoe-in.

however, even if say u were ranked in the top 10 of a sport say.... college tennis div I? well taht's great u were ranked so high, but med schools don't have sports teams. you won't help out the med school's profile by being a top collegiate athlete.

that's y it won't help that much. it'd prob help a little tho.
I disagree with this. Being a top college athlete would absolutely help your chances of getting into medical school (as long as the rest of your application is fine). Medical schools like to admit people with diverse talents, accomplishments, and backgrounds. Playing college sports is one way of showing medical schools that you are pro-active, well-rounded, and talented. Some schools, like Columbia, seem to love the athlete...but I think admissions committees would be very impressed if one were to play a college sport and do well in the premedical sciences, mcat, etc.
 

JScrusader

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I agree. participating in collegiate athletics constitutes a serious commitment. Unlike intramurals or some random volunteer activity, athletes can't miss a practice or decide not to attend an event when they have to much work to do, don't feel well, or they have to study for a test. Further, participating in athletics demonstrates serious endurance as it is difficult to study after 3 hours of hitting 300 pound men or running 3,000 meters. Students with no other obligations besides school work honestly do not realize how easy their life is. Go and play baseball but you are going to have to work for it.
 
J

jot

i have to say that i completely agree with souljah and jscrusadar --- varsity sports in college, whether its divI,III or whatever, it will stand out. i have two good friends (n=2), one at emorymed and one at einsteinmd/phd that ran xc -- and that came up repeatedly in interviews, and really added anotehr dimension. it is a feat pulling off both athletics and school, so just be committed and do it. they say that athletes grades are better in season just because of time management etc... just make sure it is priority, if you goto divIII they will understand. divI - goodluck.
go for it, its possible to do school, athletics, other stuff, and still have fun.

-jot
 

laviddee

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totally!!!!
do what you want to do!!!

you need to set yourself apart somehow.. how many science nerds do you know are varsity athletes???

my friend was the big ten tennis freshman of the year, and although she only had a 28 on the mcat, she got in without a problem.
dedication to a sport, and the training, discipline, and camaraderie you learn from it is something you CANNOT teach in a classroom.
 

chopsuey

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as a DIII athlete, i have to say that it's a great outlet from classes and that in my experience most of my best friends were made through my team or friends of my teammates. it's also nice to have something to focus on that isn't school!! most students at my school actually do better while in season because they're forced to manage time. overall, they've added a lot to my undergrad experience. if you go to a small school, sports can make everything so much more fun!

now, if it's a DI school, then i'd reconsider...as jot said, they're not big fans of the academics-before-school idea. if you want to do it, then make sure you at least take it easy course-wise for the first semester.
 

JScrusader

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Question-Would any of you former athletes given up the chance to play sports for more time to study, more free time, etc.
 

BradMcC17

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I think I would give up more time on AIM to study. The time on the field was worth it.
 
C

CyclinE

Originally posted by Cydney Foote
I think that demonstrating strong outside interests (be it baseball, drama, music, etc.) while maintaining a very good GPA tells the adcomm that you are a balanced human being, not just an automaton who does more than attend classes and study. It'll also give you good material for your essays. However, keeping up your GPA is essential. If that starts to slip because of your athletic activities, you might want to consider changing to a sport that doesn't take such a toll on your academics.
exactly. :clap:

med schools want people who have diverse activities outside of school.
 
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shamthis

I am a reapplicant. I was a top athlete at Cornell for four years and world-class for one. Additionally, I got a 3.5, a 30R, and still, NO MED SCHOOL. Yes, I applied to a wide range of schools. Yes, I am bitter. No, I never expected anything. I do not know where I went wrong...... to answer your question, just play your cards wisely. Athletics does not make or break the applicant, but it can potentially set one applicant apart from another, credentially equivalent "opponent".
 

USeF

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Originally posted by chopsuey
as a DIII athlete, i have to say that it's a great outlet from classes and that in my experience most of my best friends were made through my team or friends of my teammates. it's also nice to have something to focus on that isn't school!! most students at my school actually do better while in season because they're forced to manage time. overall, they've added a lot to my undergrad experience. if you go to a small school, sports can make everything so much more fun! ...
I got a question for those that played Div3 sports: How much time does it REALLY take? A MS1 from Michigan and I were joking how we could probably be walk ons for a sport at U of Chicago. This may be unfounded Div1-arrogance, and indeed it was mainly in jest. But I'm curious. I assume it's about the same level as a competitive high school teams [top 20 in state], would you agree?
 

xaelia

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I was Div-III for a year, and my high school team had been more competitive and taken up at least as much time.

Transferred to Div-I, and it was a solid 30+ hours a week commitment on average for both a fall and a spring season along with winter training....

They're not equivalent - which isn't to say some people don't put Div-I effort into their Div-III sports - though I don't think anyone who properly emphasizes their Div-I sports on their application is going to suffer any confusion.


Originally posted by USeF


I got a question for those that played Div3 sports: How much time does it REALLY take? A MS1 from Michigan and I were joking how we could probably be walk ons for a sport at U of Chicago. This may be unfounded Div1-arrogance, and indeed it was mainly in jest. But I'm curious. I assume it's about the same level as a competitive high school teams [top 20 in state], would you agree?
 
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jot

my highschool football team (3rd in country or some crap) would kick the **** out of our divIII team. good thing that was the pinnacle of most of their lives;)
 
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MaybeMD

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Thanks for all your help, I have really taken the different factors into account, and I think I may try it out my first year, and see after that. After all, I can somewhat afford to be average my freshman year. Just as long as I bring up my grades the next 3 years. But if there are any more opinions out there, I would love to hear them!
 

buglady

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As a former D-I cross country and track athlete, I say go for it. I have no regrets participating in intercollegiate athletics. It is a huge commitment and puts a damper on your social life at times, but I never regretted continuing on with my sport in college. Yes, it sucked at times, because I was always running or in the weight room, but I had the most fun time! It really just depends on whether you're able to handle and juggle being a student and an athlete at the same time. I always tried to remind myself that I was a student before an athlete, but it was difficult at times, especially when you're sitting in an 8 am class after morning practice and all you really want to do is take a shower and go back to bed....but, in the end, it's all worth it!!! Give it a try, at least....
 

lola

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Originally posted by xaelia
I was Div-III for a year, and my high school team had been more competitive and taken up at least as much time.

Transferred to Div-I, and it was a solid 30+ hours a week commitment on average for both a fall and a spring season along with winter training....

They're not equivalent - which isn't to say some people don't put Div-I effort into their Div-III sports - though I don't think anyone who properly emphasizes their Div-I sports on their application is going to suffer any confusion.


the time commitment for div II or III probably depends on the school you go to. i played div III tennis, and it required a pretty major time commitment. although we didn't travel across country or anything like in div I, it still took up a lot of time -- 2 hours of practice per day plus approximately 2 matches per week (3 + hrs at home, more away) for the fall and spring seasons, not to mention winter practice. i'm sure div I takes up a lot more time, but div III is not easy either if you go to a school that takes it seriously.

i'm really glad i played tennis in college and would recommend sports to anyone who is dedicated and wants to play. it's a great way to meet people freshman year and also helped me manage my time.
 

chopsuey

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i just want to say "ditto" to lola's post...i had the same experience playing Div III lacrosse time and commitment wise. it's not nearly as tough as Div I in terms of time, but it's still a test of your ability to manage time. i also really wanted to agree with the last part of what she wrote...you have to be committed, and if you are, it's a great experience!

on a side note, i spent some time coaching a middle school team. for those interested in keeping up with their sport but don't have the time to commit to a season as a player, assistant coaching or coaching with a few other people (so you're not doing all of the organizational work) is a lot of fun, too! you probably won't get paid, but it's worth the time. just ask around at any middle or high schools in the area...they normally are eager for extra staff!
 

ComplexPuzzle

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i definitely agree. i played div i soccer for four yrs. i have no regrets. it was so worth it. i learned alot more about myself and dealing with others by playing a sport. i can't imagine just going to school and not playing soccer. i am so used to having my time cramped b/c i have practice, weight lifting and a test all on the same day. i go crazy when i have too much time on my hands.
 
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