Please Read: RN aspiring to be a MD. Need advice. BSN vs BS.

Aug 31, 2015
5
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Pre-Medical
(I know my post is very long. Sorry. Please bear with me.)

Hi everyone. I've been lurking on the SDN forums for a while, and finally decided to make a account.

I'm going to provide you guys with a little backstory so that you can fully understand my dilemma.
I am currently 21 years old and hold licensure as a RN and a LPN. I started in the healthcare field at a young age. I received my LPN licensure at 18 (part of a high school nursing program), and have been working ever since as a LPN. I recently graduated in May with my Associate of Science in Nursing and also recently obtained my RN licensure. I currently work as a RN Charge Nurse and a Nursing Supervisor.

I'm not going to lie, I was forced into the nursing program by my parents when I was in high school. I did end up liking it though. When college approached, it was somewhat assumed by our teachers that we would all continue to further our education in nursing. I didn't even work as a LPN and resumed school right away when college started and decided to continue my education with nursing. So I didn't really have any experience working as a LPN before I began my RN program. I realized halfway into my RN program that I still really want to pursue medicine - something that has always been an aspiration of mine. My mom again, forced me to finish my RN program and said afterwards I can do whatever I want. Throughout my RN program I worked as a LPN - and that verified to me that nursing does not fully fulfill my goals and aspirations.

So here I am now. I have taken a semester off to apply to schools and figure out what direction I would like to go in. I still would like to pursue a career in medicine. Now onto my question (finally!)

As mentioned earlier, I currently have a Associate of Science in Nursing. I am aware that med school requirements include a Bachelors degree (in anything) and then the pre-reqs that are required. My question to you is if 1) I should continue my education in nursing and obtain a BSN and complete my pre-requisite courses simultaneously OR 2) If I should just stop with nursing and start from scratch and pursue a Bachelor of Science in Biology.

The Dilemma: My mom (I swear she practically rules every aspect of my life) feels that me obtaining a B.S in Biology is a waste because in the event I do not get accepted into med school, "the degree is completely useless" - says my mom. I do agree that there really is not much you can do with a B.S in Biology. My mom feels that continuing with the BSN route is the safest since I will have a "back up."

She is really pushing for me to just obtain my BSN and complete my pre-requisites on the side. I personally wouldn't mind because its not like I hate nursing.

I currently work in a long term care facility on a acute/rehab floor and elsewhere as a supervisor. I would love to merge into a hospital setting, but most hospitals here prefer BSNs. It is near impossible to obtain a position in a hospital with just an Associates degree. So obtaining a BSN will also help me secure a position in a hospital. I currently work full time in a nursing home (8hr shifts). So I work 5 days a week. I am highly interested in working in a hospital setting because 1) theres so much to learn in hospitals; and 2) so that I can still work full time (12 hr shifts) 3 days a week. This would be a more do-able schedule for me when I resume school.

My concern: Will applying to medical school with a B.S.N. be a disadvantage? I have read posts on here and have seen mixed opinions on it. I would prefer if someone who was once in my position can guide me?
Also I really am interested in pursuing a career in Allopathic Medicine, not Osteopathic Medicine. I have read posts on this forum stating that nurses have a better change of getting into DO programs rather than MD programs. I really would like to be part of a MD program.

Does the admissions committee at medical schools look down upon nurses transitioning into a career in medicine. If anything, I thought my experience would be a plus since I would have actual hands on experience working with patients, alongside doctors, and with other members of the interdisciplinary medical team.

People told me not to post on this forum because people on here can be really mean. If you have to be mean, go right ahead. I need a honest answer. I am certain that medicine is the career I would like to pursue. I am reading mixed things about nurses pursuing medicine and do not want to be at a disadvantage when applying to medical school simply because I am a nurse.

Thanks to anyone who actually read this. I'm really sorry that its so long. Thanks again :)
 

antsrt4

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Hello! Thanks for sharing! Sounds like you have quite the plan....if it were me, I would do a RN to BSN online (papers/discussions/and shouldn't be too hard) you are a nurse already correct? Jump forward.......BSN, working....you have the income to support the CC or University Pre reqs and bam....next time you know you'll be filling out med school apps....do what you want and you'll never work a day in your life!

Edit: No I don't think that having a BSN will hurt you....you can of course use it to your advantage and explain during the interview why you decided to make the transition, your clinical experience, etc etc
 
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DreamerCNM

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I second going for your BSN. Online BSN programs consist of writing papers on fluffy nursing theories, nothing else. You will ace it. But in case med school doesn't pan out, you have the option of becoming a CRNA/NP. And in regards to your MD vs. DO concern, it is only true because nursing is a rather difficult major, so nurses often have a lower GPA for undergrad, which forces them to go osteopathic. If you have good grades, you have a shot at both.
 
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W19

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I did RN---->BSN and it was not an issue... I took the prereqs while doing the BSN since the BSN classes weren't time consuming...

It was not a disadvantage, but you will get the question about your switch from nursing to medicine....
 
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BGMayagi

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I also vote go for the BSN as it will get you a 4 year degree sooner and save you in college loans. Also the BSN will help you if you decide to pursue other options. The BSN programs are also usually online, flexible and designed to be completed by working nurses. I am in a similar situation because I really hated the BSN courses but it didnt make sense to switch degrees.

I completed my prereqs at my local school whenever I could fit them in. Just do well in your courses and MCAT as thats really the reasoning why others with healthcare degrees struggle getting into Med School. I'm only on the interview trail, I do get asked why switching from Nursing but it doesnt seem to cause an issue, more of a curiosity. I also have alot of II so far so I cant say my nursing degree is hurting me much, if at all. Get the right stats and the doors will open.
 
OP
xHarvestMoonx
Aug 31, 2015
5
1
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Pre-Medical
Hello! Thanks for sharing! Sounds like you have quite the plan....if it were me, I would do a RN to BSN online (papers/discussions/and shouldn't be too hard) you are a nurse already correct? Jump forward.......BSN, working....you have the income to support the CC or University Pre reqs and bam....next time you know you'll be filling out med school apps....do what you want and you'll never work a day in your life!

Edit: No I don't think that having a BSN will hurt you....you can of course use it to your advantage and explain during the interview why you decided to make the transition, your clinical experience, etc etc
Thank you for your response! Yes I do have somewhat of a plan, but I'm not sure if its a good one haha. Yes I am already a nurse. I live in NYC and was planning on going to a CUNY (either Hunter or City Tech) to pursue both my BSN and complete all the required pre-med requirements.
 
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OP
xHarvestMoonx
Aug 31, 2015
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I second going for your BSN. Online BSN programs consist of writing papers on fluffy nursing theories, nothing else. You will ace it. But in case med school doesn't pan out, you have the option of becoming a CRNA/NP. And in regards to your MD vs. DO concern, it is only true because nursing is a rather difficult major, so nurses often have a lower GPA for undergrad, which forces them to go osteopathic. If you have good grades, you have a shot at both.
But aren't online programs in general looked down upon in med school applications? I was told to stay away from online schooling. Also, if I were to choose a online BSN program, then I can't really complete my BSN and pre med requirements simultaneously. I don't know. Also, how would I obtain letters of recommendations if I am taking online courses? Do they offer this option for online schools?
And I really am not interested in becoming a CRNA or a NP. I shadowed a NP for 1 month and a half - it was okay. I shadowed a doctor for a week and found the experience to be very enlightening.
Did you/are you currently in a online BSN program?

So far from my Associates degree program I have a 3.58 cumulative GPA..I know its not great but I will work very hard once I resume school in January to bring it up. For my science GPA, it is a 3.3. The only science courses required for my Associate degree program were A&P 1; A&P 2; Microbiology; and Pharmacology.
My grades in those courses:
A&P1 = A-
A&P2 = B-
Microbiology = B+
Pharmacology = A-

Thanks again for your insight!
 
OP
xHarvestMoonx
Aug 31, 2015
5
1
Status
Pre-Medical
I did RN---->BSN and it was not an issue... I took the prereqs while doing the BSN since the BSN classes weren't time consuming...

It was not a disadvantage, but you will get the question about your switch from nursing to medicine....
Do you pursue your BSN online? Have you been accepted into med school already or are you applying? If you did get accepted, was it a DO or MD program?
When the ADCOM asked you about the switch from nursing to medicine, did you feel that they took it in a negative light? Or was the question just asked out of curiosity?
Also, do you mind if I PM you?

Thanks for your response!
 
OP
xHarvestMoonx
Aug 31, 2015
5
1
Status
Pre-Medical
I also vote go for the BSN as it will get you a 4 year degree sooner and save you in college loans. Also the BSN will help you if you decide to pursue other options. The BSN programs are also usually online, flexible and designed to be completed by working nurses. I am in a similar situation because I really hated the BSN courses but it didnt make sense to switch degrees.

I completed my prereqs at my local school whenever I could fit them in. Just do well in your courses and MCAT as thats really the reasoning why others with healthcare degrees struggle getting into Med School. I'm only on the interview trail, I do get asked why switching from Nursing but it doesnt seem to cause an issue, more of a curiosity. I also have alot of II so far so I cant say my nursing degree is hurting me much, if at all. Get the right stats and the doors will open.
I agree with it helping me if I decide to pursue other options but I believe that I really would like to pursue a career in medicine; nothing else. So thats why I am asking if the BSN is looked down upon because if it is, I am willing to start over and obtain a B.S in Biology. Of course its not something I would prefer to do; but I am willing to do whatever is needed to higher my chances of being admitted into Med School. I also am not interested in caribbean medical school since I've read so many horror stories on here regarding them.
Please keep us updating on how the interviews go and the outcome of them. I would love to know what happens next. Good luck!!
 

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Do you pursue your BSN online? Have you been accepted into med school already or are you applying? If you did get accepted, was it a DO or MD program?
When the ADCOM asked you about the switch from nursing to medicine, did you feel that they took it in a negative light? Or was the question just asked out of curiosity?
Also, do you mind if I PM you?

Thanks for your response!
I took half of the classes online. I even took physics I/II at a CC and no adcoms even mentioned it (I went only to 3 interviews)... I got accepted both 1 MD and 1 DO , but I chose MD because tuition was a lot lower. In retrospect, it was a mistake because the DO school was a perfect fit for me. I would have been A LOT happier there... I did not care too much about the two letters; I just wanted to be a physician. I should have ignored the tuition difference and went with gut feeling... Anyway, the mistake is already made; can't dwell on it anymore.

I worked 7+ years as a RN. They did ask me why I want to make the switch and I told them that I want to be more involved in the decision making of my patients' healthcare (something to that effect).

You are welcome to PM me...
 

DreamerCNM

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Mar 25, 2015
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I took half of the classes online. I even took physics I/II at a CC and no adcoms even mentioned it (I went only to 3 interviews)... I got accepted both 1 MD and 1 DO , but I chose MD because tuition was a lot lower. In retrospect, it was a mistake because the DO school was a perfect fit for me. I would have been A LOT happier there... I did not care too much about the two letters; I just wanted to be a physician. I should have ignored the tuition difference and went with gut feeling... Anyway, the mistake is already made; can't dwell on it anymore.

I worked 7+ years as a RN. They did ask me why I want to make the switch and I told them that I want to be more involved in the decision making of my patients' healthcare (something to that effect).

You are welcome to PM me...

That's great to hear!! May I ask what your stats were? GPA, MCAT, volunteering/ research?
 

mikil100

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Jan 9, 2011
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(I know my post is very long. Sorry. Please bear with me.)

Hi everyone. I've been lurking on the SDN forums for a while, and finally decided to make a account.

I'm going to provide you guys with a little backstory so that you can fully understand my dilemma.
I am currently 21 years old and hold licensure as a RN and a LPN. I started in the healthcare field at a young age. I received my LPN licensure at 18 (part of a high school nursing program), and have been working ever since as a LPN. I recently graduated in May with my Associate of Science in Nursing and also recently obtained my RN licensure. I currently work as a RN Charge Nurse and a Nursing Supervisor.

I'm not going to lie, I was forced into the nursing program by my parents when I was in high school. I did end up liking it though. When college approached, it was somewhat assumed by our teachers that we would all continue to further our education in nursing. I didn't even work as a LPN and resumed school right away when college started and decided to continue my education with nursing. So I didn't really have any experience working as a LPN before I began my RN program. I realized halfway into my RN program that I still really want to pursue medicine - something that has always been an aspiration of mine. My mom again, forced me to finish my RN program and said afterwards I can do whatever I want. Throughout my RN program I worked as a LPN - and that verified to me that nursing does not fully fulfill my goals and aspirations.

So here I am now. I have taken a semester off to apply to schools and figure out what direction I would like to go in. I still would like to pursue a career in medicine. Now onto my question (finally!)

As mentioned earlier, I currently have a Associate of Science in Nursing. I am aware that med school requirements include a Bachelors degree (in anything) and then the pre-reqs that are required. My question to you is if 1) I should continue my education in nursing and obtain a BSN and complete my pre-requisite courses simultaneously OR 2) If I should just stop with nursing and start from scratch and pursue a Bachelor of Science in Biology.

The Dilemma: My mom (I swear she practically rules every aspect of my life) feels that me obtaining a B.S in Biology is a waste because in the event I do not get accepted into med school, "the degree is completely useless" - says my mom. I do agree that there really is not much you can do with a B.S in Biology. My mom feels that continuing with the BSN route is the safest since I will have a "back up."

She is really pushing for me to just obtain my BSN and complete my pre-requisites on the side. I personally wouldn't mind because its not like I hate nursing.

I currently work in a long term care facility on a acute/rehab floor and elsewhere as a supervisor. I would love to merge into a hospital setting, but most hospitals here prefer BSNs. It is near impossible to obtain a position in a hospital with just an Associates degree. So obtaining a BSN will also help me secure a position in a hospital. I currently work full time in a nursing home (8hr shifts). So I work 5 days a week. I am highly interested in working in a hospital setting because 1) theres so much to learn in hospitals; and 2) so that I can still work full time (12 hr shifts) 3 days a week. This would be a more do-able schedule for me when I resume school.

My concern: Will applying to medical school with a B.S.N. be a disadvantage? I have read posts on here and have seen mixed opinions on it. I would prefer if someone who was once in my position can guide me?
Also I really am interested in pursuing a career in Allopathic Medicine, not Osteopathic Medicine. I have read posts on this forum stating that nurses have a better change of getting into DO programs rather than MD programs. I really would like to be part of a MD program.

Does the admissions committee at medical schools look down upon nurses transitioning into a career in medicine. If anything, I thought my experience would be a plus since I would have actual hands on experience working with patients, alongside doctors, and with other members of the interdisciplinary medical team.

People told me not to post on this forum because people on here can be really mean. If you have to be mean, go right ahead. I need a honest answer. I am certain that medicine is the career I would like to pursue. I am reading mixed things about nurses pursuing medicine and do not want to be at a disadvantage when applying to medical school simply because I am a nurse.

Thanks to anyone who actually read this. I'm really sorry that its so long. Thanks again :)

Hello, I'm glad you made this post. I was once in a position very similar to you. I graduated with an ASN at the age of 19, and had to make the choice between a BSN or a BS in Biology. I chose the BS in Biology and haven't a single regret, of course.

I should mention I am applying to Allopathic schools only and currently have two interview invites. 3.79 AMCAS GPA, with a 517 MCAT (96 percentile).

Now, on to your question. There are definite benefits of going for a BSN. You will spend less time in school, can probably get reimbursed, and as you said, it is a "good" backup. However, think of how much it will benefit you as a future physician? little.. You need to take into account what your academic career prior to Medical school will be like. A BSN will not teach you anything you need to know for the MCAT, and won't translate into medical school as well as the hard Biology classes. In addition, from what I've read here, medical schools seem to think nursing curriculum is easier than Biology. Honestly, I believe that is a misconception. Not because Biology is easier.. honestly the Physics and Chemistry (which you must take anyways) is much harder than any nursing class. But, nursing schools tend to grade a bit more harshly than other schools, in my experience, and you could end up deflating your grades.

Some additional things I would like to mention as I was in a similar position as you three years ago. Please, do some volunteering throughout the year, try and get some research done. You will have excellent clinical and leadership EC's, but those two extra things can help a fair amount.
If you have any questions about my ASN->BS Biology path let me know!
 

sunshinefl

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I'm an ASN RN pursuing premed through a bachelors of psychology. My choice was stay at the state college where I got my ASN and do an online BSN, or transfer to a major university for the psych degree. To me it was an obvious choice. Yes, GPA is king. But the peripheral elements to your app start to add up. The benefits of the university are: in person (online can be looked down on), Getting to know LOR writers (as you mentioned), research opportunities, rigor (if everyone on this thread knows that the online BSN is easier, you can bet adcoms do too), organizations/clubs, MCAT prep classes that are local (bigger demand, prior to moving here the closest was 2 hours away), proving your academic preparedness in upper level sciences and other university classes, undergrad courses offered by the medical school including physician shadowing (may be unique to my university but probably not), prehealth resources (besides advisors which some on SDN think are poor, there are mock interviews, personal statement reviews, etc). This is just off the top of my head. I am 29 and don't have to answer to him, but like your mom, my dad said the BS in psych was a "useless" degree and that I should pursue the BSN "in case". I gave him a similar speech about intangibles to present the best app I possibly could and he finally got on board. Besides, even if you somehow were unsuccessful at getting into Medical school and gave up, you already have a "back up"! You are a working RN! And in addition to putting your best foot forward for your app, you should also be thinking about getting the best preparation to be a physician you can. Do you really think that is in an online BSN program? If you go to a university you will have a broader range of electives and experiences. I volunteer with international students at my university specifically to learn English. I'm taking electives like "medicine and the law" and "biomedical engineering for global health". I would never have those opportunities in an online BSN program.
Also, you shouldn't have to "start from scratch", some courses should transfer. I don't know your state, but maybe it has a program like Florida's 2+2. I earned my AA alongside my ASN to be eligible to transfer into a state university as a junior.

I would say do an in person bachelor degree at a university in whatever major interests you.
 
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NoTownPreMed

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Hey xHarvestmoonx, good seeing a fellow nurse aspiring to make the transition from nursing to medicine. I would agree with some of the above posters, going for that BSN is a much wiser decision as it gives you the fastest route in earning a bachelors degree. Also, DO programs are very indeed friendly to nontrads so an opportunity to take advantage of this benefit in my eyes is golden. May I ask why you stated "I really am interested in pursuing a career in Allopathic Medicine, not Osteopathic Medicine." Are you more concerned with the initials after your name? Because a career in Allopathic Medicine is the exact same thing as a career in Osteopathic Medicine when it is all said and done.
 

FCMike11

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Agreed with everyone else, do your BSN. I made the same decision and you will come out better financially (you have already done 50% of your BSN by completing your ADN). General consensus is schools don't care about your undergrad major, just your grades. Your mom is correct, career-wise a BSN will actually do something for you, a BS won't.

Just take your pre-reqs. The general "ease" of my BSN coursework has allowed me to focus more on my science courses.
 
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Jewels86

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You are going to have to get your BSN if you want to work at a Magnet facility. However, if you are ready to pursue medicine at any cost, then the BS makes more sense. The BSN online portion consists of community nursing, management and other stuff that is directed towards nursing.

As for your question about stopping nursing to work on your BS...that really is up to you. I can see where your mom is coming from since yes, it makes sense to get your BSN first and then do the BS courses however, as previously stated, your BSN is more of a formality rather than the rule when it comes to working. I have both my BSN and a grad degree and it has not improved my patient care. What does is studying older med school text books (around 2010 and later).

So...yes, your mom has a ton of wisdom!! Apply it if nursing is your goal. But if becoming a physician is, then go for the BS. You can always get the 13-15 month online BSN later on. And most facilities that are magnet help with the tuition.
 

jl lin

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Oct 9, 2009
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(I know my post is very long. Sorry. Please bear with me.)

Hi everyone. I've been lurking on the SDN forums for a while, and finally decided to make a account.

I'm going to provide you guys with a little backstory so that you can fully understand my dilemma.
I am currently 21 years old and hold licensure as a RN and a LPN. I started in the healthcare field at a young age. I received my LPN licensure at 18 (part of a high school nursing program), and have been working ever since as a LPN. I recently graduated in May with my Associate of Science in Nursing and also recently obtained my RN licensure. I currently work as a RN Charge Nurse and a Nursing Supervisor.

I'm not going to lie, I was forced into the nursing program by my parents when I was in high school. I did end up liking it though. When college approached, it was somewhat assumed by our teachers that we would all continue to further our education in nursing. I didn't even work as a LPN and resumed school right away when college started and decided to continue my education with nursing. So I didn't really have any experience working as a LPN before I began my RN program. I realized halfway into my RN program that I still really want to pursue medicine - something that has always been an aspiration of mine. My mom again, forced me to finish my RN program and said afterwards I can do whatever I want. Throughout my RN program I worked as a LPN - and that verified to me that nursing does not fully fulfill my goals and aspirations.

So here I am now. I have taken a semester off to apply to schools and figure out what direction I would like to go in. I still would like to pursue a career in medicine. Now onto my question (finally!)

As mentioned earlier, I currently have a Associate of Science in Nursing. I am aware that med school requirements include a Bachelors degree (in anything) and then the pre-reqs that are required. My question to you is if 1) I should continue my education in nursing and obtain a BSN and complete my pre-requisite courses simultaneously OR 2) If I should just stop with nursing and start from scratch and pursue a Bachelor of Science in Biology.

The Dilemma: My mom (I swear she practically rules every aspect of my life) feels that me obtaining a B.S in Biology is a waste because in the event I do not get accepted into med school, "the degree is completely useless" - says my mom. I do agree that there really is not much you can do with a B.S in Biology. My mom feels that continuing with the BSN route is the safest since I will have a "back up."

She is really pushing for me to just obtain my BSN and complete my pre-requisites on the side. I personally wouldn't mind because its not like I hate nursing.

I currently work in a long term care facility on a acute/rehab floor and elsewhere as a supervisor. I would love to merge into a hospital setting, but most hospitals here prefer BSNs. It is near impossible to obtain a position in a hospital with just an Associates degree. So obtaining a BSN will also help me secure a position in a hospital. I currently work full time in a nursing home (8hr shifts). So I work 5 days a week. I am highly interested in working in a hospital setting because 1) theres so much to learn in hospitals; and 2) so that I can still work full time (12 hr shifts) 3 days a week. This would be a more do-able schedule for me when I resume school.

My concern: Will applying to medical school with a B.S.N. be a disadvantage? I have read posts on here and have seen mixed opinions on it. I would prefer if someone who was once in my position can guide me?
Also I really am interested in pursuing a career in Allopathic Medicine, not Osteopathic Medicine. I have read posts on this forum stating that nurses have a better change of getting into DO programs rather than MD programs. I really would like to be part of a MD program.

Does the admissions committee at medical schools look down upon nurses transitioning into a career in medicine. If anything, I thought my experience would be a plus since I would have actual hands on experience working with patients, alongside doctors, and with other members of the interdisciplinary medical team.

People told me not to post on this forum because people on here can be really mean. If you have to be mean, go right ahead. I need a honest answer. I am certain that medicine is the career I would like to pursue. I am reading mixed things about nurses pursuing medicine and do not want to be at a disadvantage when applying to medical school simply because I am a nurse.

Thanks to anyone who actually read this. I'm really sorry that its so long. Thanks again :)
OP, I do feel sad that for whatever reason you do not feel empowered enough to make your own choices. This is something you must remedy; but you can do so wisely without forfeiting the benefit of your mother's wisdom or that of others, if, that is, their suggestions truly make good sense for you.

Now that I have stated all of that, I will say that since much of your credits are in nursing, it makes much sense to complete the undergrad degree in nursing in that it affords you the optimal use of time and money. Regardless of your major, you will have to complete, as you know, the required sciences; thus completing the undergrad in nursing is fine, while also taking the pre-reqs and doing well in each of them. As you also know, there are others things you must do in order to have the most optimal application for MS. Most of your credits are in nursing and general education courses that have been applied to the AS in Nursing. So, you are not completing your undergrad degree from scratch.

Had you not already been a nurse, I would have advised you to take a different approach. The reason for that is if one is not going to working directly in nursing for a good enough period of time--as close to full-time as possible--then the benefit of the degree is negligible. Of course one can learn from any area of chosen study if the person is enthusiastic about learning in general. A degree in nursing, however, is one that in order to have it make sense to the individual as well as to those one seeks to help, it must be applied. In short, it is in it's own right an applied art and science. This general aspect of application is not so different from medicine in terms of the general application. Medicine is different in scope and depth; but it is similar to nursing in that, in general, it must be applied regularly with sick people in order to make sense of it's use. When a person starts from the beginning and says they will study nursing along with the pre-reqs for MS and then seek application to MS, I feel that much of what one has studied is lost from lack of actual application over time. Since you have already been using both the didactic and clinical, it seems sensible, if you are in haste about pursuing medicine, to complete the degree you have and include pre-med courses as well as the other things needed for your application.

If I had not had the degree in nursing, I would have studied biochemistry. But that was not my life or experience, since I did not entertain the notion of medicine in my early years of study. Use what you have, and then move forward, unless you feel that you would be enthralled at learning and obtaining an undergrad science degree. Why not see how you do in some other undergrad pre-req sciences for MS and go from there?
 
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FCMike11

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Medical Student
You are going to have to get your BSN if you want to work at a Magnet facility. However, if you are ready to pursue medicine at any cost, then the BS makes more sense. The BSN online portion consists of community nursing, management and other stuff that is directed towards nursing.

As for your question about stopping nursing to work on your BS...that really is up to you. I can see where your mom is coming from since yes, it makes sense to get your BSN first and then do the BS courses however, as previously stated, your BSN is more of a formality rather than the rule when it comes to working. I have both my BSN and a grad degree and it has not improved my patient care. What does is studying older med school text books (around 2010 and later).

So...yes, your mom has a ton of wisdom!! Apply it if nursing is your goal. But if becoming a physician is, then go for the BS. You can always get the 13-15 month online BSN later on. And most facilities that are magnet help with the tuition.
How does a BS make more sense? Bad advice. OP can take the pre-reqs along with the BSN and be prepared for MCAT. Pursuing an additional degree will be more costly and ultimately not yield anything for OP.
 
Sep 13, 2015
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Pre-Medical
Hi! Amazing how similar our plans are. I am currently an RN and I have just completed my BSN this past April. However, I was advised that an online BSN would almost be considered a joke to medical schools. I also was not able to complete many of the prerequisites since my degree was completed online. I still need to complete many sciences with labs. My advisor recommended that I "start over" and pursue a degree in Chemistry/Biology/Biochem. At first I thought this was going to be a major setback but it should only take two years or so depending on the set up of classes. After taking some time and thinking about it I figured it would take me about two years to complete the prerequisites anyway so I might as well come away with the degree. I'm not sure if it would be possible for you to complete your BSN online while simultaneously taking prerequisites in an actual classroom.