Apr 22, 2018
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How hard would it be to find a job in a specific geographic location, such as Illinois? I am pretty set on living in one certain state when I graduate. Is this unrealistic as a podiatrist?
 

Dochopeful13

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Apr 3, 2013
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That didnt really answer my question hahaha, the weather could be better LOL but my whole entire extended family is there and SO
Haha I’m jk I live pretty close to Scholl so I will be applying there as well. I have done some research with BLS and it seems like IL, Wisc, MN, and NE and the top paying states for Podiatry. So I would imagine IL is a good place to practice.
 

CutsWithFury

I like to cut
Feb 2, 2019
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Podiatry Hell
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How hard would it be to find a job in a specific geographic location, such as Illinois? I am pretty set on living in one certain state when I graduate. Is this unrealistic as a podiatrist?
There are plenty of podiatrists in Illinois ready to offer you a crappy 75K associate contract when you graduate residency. Don't you worry
 

Podstar

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You will be able to find a job in Illinois. Also, I liked it there the few times I’ve been.
 
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Podstar

Head, shoulders, knees and... Nope, just toes.
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are they really just all going to be lowballing offers? is that really common?
I’m still a student, so I don’t have experience with the job search or pay. From what I’ve gathered, it seems that private practices hiring associates tend to make low offers. Higher paying positions seem to be with ortho groups, multi-specialty groups, and hospitals that employ podiatrists. These positions are few and far between or don’t exist though; they definitely are not advertised as far as I have seen through my research. I think all of us students have the same worry about finding a good paying job that lets us practice to the full extent of our training when we finish residency. My plan is to make as many connections as possible during school and residency, don’t piss anybody off, don’t take a lowball offer (easier said than done when the debt interest is piling up), and do my best to market myself to hospitals or groups that do not have a podiatrist position and create my own. I am also looking to live in a rural area (my choice), but I am not sure how this effects job prospects.
 

Dochopeful13

5+ Year Member
Apr 3, 2013
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I’m still a student, so I don’t have experience with the job search or pay. From what I’ve gathered, it seems that private practices hiring associates tend to make low offers. Higher paying positions seem to be with ortho groups, multi-specialty groups, and hospitals that employ podiatrists. These positions are few and far between or don’t exist though; they definitely are not advertised as far as I have seen through my research. I think all of us students have the same worry about finding a good paying job that lets us practice to the full extent of our training when we finish residency. My plan is to make as many connections as possible during school and residency, don’t piss anybody off, don’t take a lowball offer (easier said than done when the debt interest is piling up), and do my best to market myself to hospitals or groups that do not have a podiatrist position and create my own. I am also looking to live in a rural area (my choice), but I am not sure how this effects job prospects.
I’m really starting to doubt if 7 years of training is worth it then
 

AttackNME

Podiatrist
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Feb 22, 2007
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How hard would it be to find a job in a specific geographic location, such as Illinois? I am pretty set on living in one certain state when I graduate. Is this unrealistic as a podiatrist?
This difficulty will depend on your work ethic and social network. If you work hard and know people, you can get the job you want. Keep in mind that your first job isn't going to be the last, like any job, podiatrists would rather hire people with experience than a fresh new grad, so if your first gig sucks, just take it as a learning and experience building opportunity and keep looking for the job you want. Just remember that Ortho and neurosurgery residents are stuck in training for longer than you, so think of your first few years out as extended residencies.
 

ExperiencedDPM

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Nov 23, 2015
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You’re too early in your career to worry about where you’re going to practice. There are so many factors that haven’t been considered. You may obtain a residency and make great contacts and want to practice in that area. This is your CAREER, and although it’s nice to be near family, you don’t want to potentially limit your potential by being set on one location.

Do well in school, do well in your exams and obtain a strong program. Work hard, be ethical and see how it plays out. You’re worrying about where to practice prematurely.
 

greasemonkey

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Apr 13, 2011
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. I am also looking to live in a rural area (my choice), but I am not sure how this effects job prospects.
From what I've seen of my fellow classmates, the ones that end up in rural areas ended up with really nice paying position with hospitals. If a position is not already available, the hospitals were very quick/helpful in creating the position and were very appreciative to have podiatry service available to their community. Best of luck!
 

Nowehjose

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Mar 23, 2017
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I’m generally scared of big cities/their suburbs because of hospitals like Stony Brook Health, Mt Sinai, NYU, northwell health (NYC area for example). Some literally strip doctors of their practices after they sign into their systems and dispute a future contract in 5-10 years.

Oncologist who treated my mom just got booted because they wanted to decrease his salary significantly(hospital bullied him into joining). Literally escorted him out of the hospital via cops when he requested a different offer. I think it’s scary to build a practice/reputation/patient base in a healthcare system then get exiled because of pencil pushers .
Also...
When you say rural do you mean, blue ridge mountains or small cities of (50k-100k) outskirts. My township is 200k+ people... so I consider cities+suburbs under 100k the boonies.
 

Podstar

Head, shoulders, knees and... Nope, just toes.
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I’m generally scared of big cities/their suburbs because of hospitals like Stony Brook Health, Mt Sinai, NYU, northwell health (NYC area for example). Some literally strip doctors of their practices after they sign into their systems and dispute a future contract in 5-10 years.

Oncologist who treated my mom just got booted because they wanted to decrease his salary significantly(hospital bullied him into joining). Literally escorted him out of the hospital via cops when he requested a different offer. I think it’s scary to build a practice/reputation/patient base in a healthcare system then get exiled because of pencil pushers .
Also...
When you say rural do you mean, blue ridge mountains or small cities of (50k-100k) outskirts. My township is 200k+ people... so I consider cities+suburbs under 100k the boonies.
I grew up in a town of 65k, 30 minutes from a city of 1.5 million. The area I am looking to practice has a population of about 12k and there is currently no podiatrist within 100 miles. It is a lot more rural than my hometown and I can have a big ass ranch there, as the land is a lot cheaper. Eventually I will probably get a condo or house in a city or vacation area I like. I only plan to practice podiatry for 20 years or so before I move on to my second career, which I can do literally anywhere.
 
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Nowehjose

2+ Year Member
Mar 23, 2017
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I grew up in a town of 65k, 30 minutes from a city of 1.5 million. The area I am looking to practice has a population of about 12k and there is currently no podiatrist within 100 miles. It is a lot more rural than my hometown and I can have a big ass ranch there, as the land is a lot cheaper. Eventually I will probably get a condo or house in a city or vacation area I like. I only plan to practice podiatry for 20 years or so before I move on to my second career, which I can do literally anywhere.
Sounds nice. I just want my own practice.