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Pod school MCAT 2015 averages

Discussion in 'Pre-Podiatry Students' started by captain23, Aug 18, 2015.

  1. captain23

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    1. Since some of us are starting to get our new mcat 2015 scores, what are pod schools considering average?
    2. What's the minimum? (The lowest I've seen for the old test was for OCPM/Kent at 15 - what would that be for the new test?)

    Please share your thoughts. If you directly called a school and asked, please post what they said.
     
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  3. Sweatshirt

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    They are just comparing percentiles. Check averages for the old MCAT, convert that to percentiles, use that percentile to find the new MCAT averages
     
  4. tlacey2323

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    Good call. I've been looking for a score conversion tool but can't find one. Guess we're all going to have to do it the old fashioned way.
     
  5. bobtheweazel

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    Average 2015 MCAT: 494
    Minimum 2015 MCAT: 484

    Using what we'll now call "The Sweatshirt Method", a 15 on the old MCAT would be around the 8th percentile. Based on the April-May 2015 MCAT results, that would convert to about a 484 on the new MCAT.

    Further extrapolating, the approximate average of the MCAT averages for the 9 colleges for the 2013-2014 entering classes would be around a 22, which would be right around the 32nd percentile which for the new MCAT would be around a 494.

    https://www.aamc.org/students/download/430684/data/finalpercentileranksfortheoldmcatexam.pdf

    https://www.aamc.org/students/download/434504/data/percentilenewmcat.pdf
     
    #4 bobtheweazel, Aug 19, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2015
    tlacey2323 likes this.
  6. tlacey2323

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    So if i shoot for north of 500 I should be fairly competitive then?
     
  7. skim25

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    Depending on your GPA, getting the average for your MCAT could make you competitive as well. Obviously, getting 500+ doesn't hurt.
     
    tlacey2323 likes this.
  8. tlacey2323

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    I have an average GPA (3.2) at a notable public university in Florida. I really want to be competitive and have my choice of schools becuase I really love the southeast. I lived in Minnesota for a year for my job and I would hate to have to go to Iowa, MN, etc or even NY for school. Cold doesn't even begin to describe the climate in some of the northern states. So as of right now I'm just trying to maximize my chance of getting into Barry. I likely won't apply til next cycle so I've got time to "get my ducks in a row."
     
    #7 tlacey2323, Aug 20, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015
  9. bobtheweazel

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    Also Barry has some of the lowest standards, so you shouldn't worry tooooo much...
     
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  10. skim25

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    your GPA is fine for Barry. Based on what I can see, Barry's average GPA range is: sgpa-3.06, cgpa-3.21. For their MCAT average, it's around 22. Like I said before, getting a 500+ doesn't hurt. It can help you obtain some scholarships. However, imo, as long as you get an MCAT score in the mid 20s, you should be fine. Just make sure you apply as early as you can for a higher chance.
     
  11. BTR1208

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    Guys need advice...

    I would love to take the last MCAT of 2015 in 5 weeks however up until today I have been studying for the DAT. Decided I want to pursuit podiatry instead.

    Not sure if I can be prepared in 5 weeks to get the score I need (~490 i guess?). My GPA is above average (3.65cum, 3.75science), good EC's, etc.

    I would love to apply early and broadly rather than wait until January and possibly miss out on AZ or DMU.

    Could anyone help me set up a plan for 5 weeks of intense studying? I have exam krackers and a subscription to coursesaver (Chad's videos)

    Thanks so much!!
     
  12. bobtheweazel

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    5 weeks? Sounds brutal. Good luck.Worse case scenario I suppose you could retake in January, although the MCAT threshold for pod school isn't very high and you have good GPAs so you'll probably get in somewhere even if you bomb the test.

    I'll tell you how I studied for the old MCAT and you can take from it what you will, although I know the new MCAT has changed some content around and added some as well. I did get a 32 on the old MCAT which should be around a 509-511 on the new MCAT. I took the MCAT the first week of January and I only studied for it the three months prior. Also in that time, I was taking Organic Chemistry I and I hadn't taken Organic Chemistry II or Physics II yet either so all of that was completely new to me in my studying. Also I was working 40 hours a week and was taking classes full time and I was in a band and had other commitments. Suffice it to say, I didn't have much study time. Here are my tips:
    (1) Review this and start a word document that lists every single item that they list:https://www.aamc.org/students/download/377882/data/mcat2015-content.pdf This step is super lame but also super vital. This is the test makers telling you EXACTLY what is fair game for you to be tested on. This is the same list that the test writers work off of, so this is the same list you should study off of. I made a list of all the categories and items, just as they did, and then I went through my lecture notes and my MCAT review materials and filled in information under each item, basically just putting in definitions or brief descriptions. Nothing on the MCAT will be super in depth. It is just covering basic knowledge. If you have more than a few solid sentences per item, you probably have too much info.
    (2) Use a variety of source materials (e.g., ExamKrackers, Kaplan, etc.) because each source will cover subjects differently and one might explain something better than another. Also, from my experience each of these sources maybe covers like 85-90% of the potential MCAT content. Yes, some topics a source will just completely skip over. You can't trust them to cover every single thing, but if you have your handy-dandy list from step one then you will know what they didn't cover and so what you'll need to find from another source.
    (3) Use a variety of study methods. Don't just read material, but actually type the most relevant information into your document from step one. Also, try something like ExamKrackers Audio Osmosis or make your own audio study clips. This will allow you to study while you work, drive, exercise, shower, etc. and the more study time the better.
    (4) Find anything that will help you remember. Use every clever mnemonic you can find or make your own. Also, it will help if you can make connections between all these random facts and understand a bit of the underlying processes or maybe even the history behind a particular topic. These facts are like a puzzle. There is only one truth in science and so only one way that all the pieces of the puzzle fit together. If you have a good idea of the bigger picture each fact should trigger the memory of multiple other facts. That kind of approach will make it less like memorizing definitions and more like memorizing a story, which is FAR easier.
    (5) Repetition. For audio studying, let's say through the music app on your phone, once you have a particular clip or lesson down, delete it. Once you reach the end of all your audio content or whichever specific section you're having trouble with repeat it all. Every time you go through it and delete more things you remember the list that's left over will be smaller and smaller. This will keep you from wasting time on things you already know and will force you to keep repeating the things you don't. You will just have an ever-decreasing playlist of things you don't know. Do the same with that long content list that you make. I made a copy of the document as a kind of worksheet and I read through it, retyping tougher concepts in ways easier for me to understand and deleting topics that I knew well. Every time I repeated the list I remembered more and more things and deleted more and more things and the list became a list of things I didn't know well and that list grew smaller and smaller with every repeat.
    (6) Theory is good and well, but you'll need practice. Especially for the mathematics, since you'll have to remember all of your basic equations and you'll have to quickly scribble out some basic arithmetic and logarithmic calculations on scratchpaper and without a calculator. Don't waste your time practicing though until you've got a good hold of all the knowledge you'll need. The MCAT approaches questions in a pretty unique way, so you'll need to allot time to get used to their style. And once you get comfortable with their style, start timing yourself. That timer can be a bi-otch.
    (7) As far as the passages, don't sweat trying to remember every single word of every single passage. It won't happen. Many of the passage associated questions you could probably answer without ever reading the passage and the rest you can probably narrow down to 50/50 with a brief read through of the passage and of course you knowledge of the content. Just look for any landmarks in the passage that might help you quickly go back and reference the passage if necessary. Unless you have robot eyes you will not have time to read any passage twice.
    ( 8 ) During the test take a break whenever you get a chance, even if only for a few seconds just try to clear your mind. Very soon into the test your head will feel like a block of cement, like no more information could possibly enter or exit your brain any more. This test is overwhelming. Relax as much as possible and try not to get flustered.

    P.S. If you PM me I may be able to get you a copy of the Exam Krackers Audio Osmosis for the old MCAT. It covers most of the biology, physics, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry you will see. Not sure how much it would help with the biochem...
     
    #11 bobtheweazel, Aug 22, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2015
    Podiatry_23 likes this.

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