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Podiatry Hospital Jobs

Discussion in 'Podiatric Residents & Physicians' started by Ankle Breaker, Dec 6, 2017 at 4:56 PM.

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  1. Ankle Breaker

    Ankle Breaker Senior Member Podiatrist 7+ Year Member

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    Not all podiatry hospital jobs are equal...

    I told you that podiatry's future will most likely have more podiatrists employed by hospitals

    This can be a good and bad thing.

    Very few hospital employed podiatrists enjoy the freedom to do ankle surgery, especially trauma, when there are is a large orthopedic presence within the hospital. It would take years of political games and ass kissing to get there. It takes a special person to accomplish something like that.

    I have been seeing some BIG hospitals and hospital systems start posting they are looking for a podiatrist...to do diabetic foot pus, wound care, non-surgical care, general podiatry. They aren't hiring you to be the elective foot and ankle surgeon guru or put in total ankle implants.

    Recent job postings I have come across involving these hospitals...
    - University of Connecticut
    - University of Iowa
    - University of Colorado
    - UNC Chapel Hill
    - Ohio State University

    Very large hospital systems are getting tired of not cashing in on the general podiatry crap that their ERs refer out to the community/private practice DPMs. It makes a lot of sense for them to hire DPMs. The salaries would actually be pretty good too for the amount of work and responsibility you would actually have.

    Something to keep an eye on...
     
    ksp2276, ExperiencedDPM, sloh and 5 others like this.
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  3. air bud

    air bud 7+ Year Member

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    Land of the free
    University of Iowa has been advertising for a year or so. I have talked with Colorado and they said they didn't hire podiatrists at all, maybe this is something new. Regardless, Ortho in Denver runs everything with Ng & Jacobson being the exception to the rule. All those places will never let a pod to trauma or TAR. I wonder what ever came out of the Duke fellowship. I know the guy who did it, but haven't talked to him to see if actually got to do good stuff. Regardless looks good on paper for advertising...
    There are still hospital jobs out there where a pod can do good stuff. The reality is that it needs to be someplace that Ortho F&A doesnt want to go. So no, you are not going to have a hospital job and great cases in Denver, Austin, San Diego, Vail, Kalispell, Ashville etc. If there is anyone there, they have been there awhile and earned it. But the new graduating resident, if you want a hospital job with great cases it will be in small town North Dakota, middle of nowhere nebraska, BFE Kansas etc.
    Fortunately beauty is in the eye of the beholder. In a few days I will sign a contract at rural hospital where I will get to do anything and everything I want (TAR, trauma, big recon....) This town has never had a podiatrist. They have no ortho. It is close to where I want to live. It is going to have great benefits. I will expand on it in the job search thread soon, but it came out of me being proactive and picking up the phone. They didn't care where I did residency, it actually has never come up. They haven't asked to see my logs. I told them what I can do and what I wanted to do and they said ok (and will have it written in my contract...). Everything has been based on personality and social skills. Anyways, more to come soon...
     
  4. air bud

    air bud 7+ Year Member

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    The fact is that pods can make hospital systems a lot of money. What is funny about all this new paradigm is that the people who will take these new jobs with very good benefits will not be the ones who are fellowship trained and certified in this TAR or that TAR. Instead it will likely be the married with 4 kids pod who wants to work 8 to 5, doesn't really care for surgery, doesn't care about national recognition etc. And the fellowship trained will be struggling to find the job that will let them use their training to the full extent. I have a lot of friends who are fellowship trained, and many of them are now in jobs where they are not using their full training, and not sure if they will anytime soon. I think this whole fellowship thing jumped the shark a few years ago. Different thread, but I think 75 percent of the people doing a fellowship are wasting a year of their life.
     
  5. Ankle Breaker

    Ankle Breaker Senior Member Podiatrist 7+ Year Member

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    I wanted to do a fellowship. Interviewed for several of the big name programs. Didn't get it. I was upset.

    BUT if I had done a fellowship and ended up where I am now, doing what I am now...I would be livid.

    I wholeheartedly agree with the above statement. Fellowship training is a nice feather in your cap and definitely gives you more confidence in the OR but if you go to a job that won't allow you to use your skills then what is the point? If ortho says no total ankle implants for the podiatrist guess what? You are not putting in a total ankle implant. End of story.
     
  6. GypsyHummus

    GypsyHummus 5+ Year Member

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    Seems like small/Rural community hospitals are the way to go, preferably where Ortho doesn’t boss people around.

    Thanks for the info, really appreciate the insight into the profession!
     
    Chestnut5 and SLCpod like this.
  7. AttackNME

    AttackNME Podiatrist Podiatrist 10+ Year Member

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    Thank you for sharing your story and struggles, I think it’s enlightening for everyone. I too work for a university/hospital, and can agree that there is a strong orthopedic presence where I mostly get the “leftovers”. However I was hired knowing that my job is in limb salvage, so I was okay with potentially not meeting my numbers for ABFAS (although I’m starting to get elective cases that will get me at least forefoot certified in a few years). I didn’t have a fellowship, and the ortho chair didn’t care, but I can tell you that having fellowship behind my belt would have increased my salary by a good 20k. At first, I wished I had done a fellowship for the money, but in hindsight, I agree with the ortho chair, I don’t think fellowship is needed to do what I do.
     
    RedoxRxn likes this.
  8. smurfeyD

    smurfeyD 2+ Year Member

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    Congrats on the new contract! Sounds like it more of what you wanted
     
    Chestnut5 and RedoxRxn like this.
  9. mǫrk xc

    mǫrk xc

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    For any pod students and residents that are reading this discussion, I’ll offer a different perspective on fellowships and hospital jobs:

    1) Please seek out and converse with Wukich, Steinberg, Armstrong, L. Rogers, Harkless, Zgonis or anyone else who has trained and graduated limb salvage/preservation fellows. These graduates are enormously well prepared to enter well-known hospital systems (both home and abroad) and take ownership of the pathologies that other surgical specialists don’t prefer doing. Many of them are building bridges and forging new relationships with Ortho, vascular, plastics and most med specialties and demonstrating what podiatry is very capable of. They are proving instrumental in building limb preservation programs and alleviating the great burden that diabetic foot complications place on these patients and their families. They are inundated with clinical, surgical, call duties, and academic work. Some are serving as residency directors and most of these fellows are truly making a difference in these health institutions and their medical/social communities.These are not your “pod who wants to work 8 to 5, doesn't really care for surgery, doesn't care about national recognition etc.” They are entering reputable institutions as ambassadors for Podiatry to serve an unmet need, and make an impact on their patients’ lives.

    2) Fellowships not only make you confident in the OR, they provide you a foundation on which you will construct your confidence and poise as a clinician, researcher, and administrator. Most 1-yr fellowships will provide you with valuable surgical, clinical, and social experiences that normally would take you 3-5 years to gain in practice. Not only that, but a fellowship expands your network and makes you more marketable to all types of employers. If you are able to accomplish all of this and increase your earning potential (by 20K or more) in one additional year post-residency, why wouldn’t you consider doing a fellowship? If you are unsatisfied with your first job after graduating, you’ll still be very marketable in your search for a new one. Most importantly, an additional year of fellowship training will make you that much more prepared to take care of your own living patients.
     
  10. air bud

    air bud 7+ Year Member

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    Good post. And you are right. I should have been more clear. In these academic centers that were originally posted, the limb preservation model is alive and well, involves complicated cases and is by no means 8 to 5. Fellowship can absolutely help in those situations. Podiatry plays an important role in the Toe/flow model. I would think fellowship would be the only entry point to the type of position you are referring to.
    I was referring to non-academic centers and hospital systems. I guess (and guided by my own personal bias and sterotypes).
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017 at 4:14 AM
  11. Robert De Niro

    Robert De Niro 7+ Year Member

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    Look forward to hearing more about your experience; and congrats. Finding a small town, possible middle of nowhere hospital with little to no ortho/pod presence has been my game plan for about 2 years now. Still in first year of residency but trying to get an idea how to accomplish his goal.
     
    DexterMorganSK and smurfeyD like this.
  12. Weirdy

    Weirdy

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    Do you have personal experience with Harkless, Zgonis, or the residency program down there?

    Would having these types of individuals do anything to better the residency program?

    I've heard conflicting opinions. I apologize if this comes off as rude.
     
  13. PashaOdesit

    PashaOdesit Nobel Prize Recipient Gold Donor Classifieds Approved

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    That's where I would like to live and practice anyways. If rural is better for pods, It is better for me.
     
  14. AttackNME

    AttackNME Podiatrist Podiatrist 10+ Year Member

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    Those fellowships can help jumpstart your career so you have more opportunities such as starting your own limb salvage center, have a higher salary, and networking. But those are things that could be earned and learned through practice as well without a fellowship if you have the drive to keep pushing the envelope.
     
  15. GypsyHummus

    GypsyHummus 5+ Year Member

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    Without giving too much personal data away, for these hospital positions that podiatrists are finding, what are the salary/bonus structures? Paid time off? Any restrictions on moonlighting?
     
  16. pacpod

    pacpod Administrator Podiatrist 7+ Year Member

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    This is exactly why I’m doing a fellowship. My interest is in limb salvage and want to practice in the university/academic medical center setting.
     
    diabeticfootdr likes this.
  17. ExperiencedDPM

    ExperiencedDPM 2+ Year Member

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    Don’t mean to be picky but it’s a personal pet peeve of mine. There is no certification in forefoot surgery. It’s simply foot surgery.
     
  18. Ankle Breaker

    Ankle Breaker Senior Member Podiatrist 7+ Year Member

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    Wukich is an orthopedist

    Steinberg/Armstrong/Rogers/Harkless are career lecturers on the national circuit. They do good research but I wouldn't classify them as foot and ankle surgeons

    Zgonis is the only person on that list that does good research and has serious skills in the OR. He's a guy who can forge multiple specialties and demonstrate what a well trained foot and ankle surgeon/podiatrist is capable of. If you want to be fellowship trained in diabetic limb salvage then I would do a fellowship to aspire to be like him. That's the only point of doing diabetic limb salvage fellowship. To obtain skills in ex fix, muscle flaps, rotational skin flaps, etc to preserve limbs.

    I find your comments above to be quite offensive. Every podiatrist does some form of diabetic limb salvage. You don't need a fellowship to do that. If you want to stand behind a podium then do a diabetic limb salvage fellowship.

    How many graduates of diabetic limb salvage fellowships are working at big time hospitals doing complicated limb salvage procedures? I don't know any with exception to the people you just listed. Wukich and Zgonis are the only people I would consider actual surgeons.

    Fellowships help with confidence in the OR. That's it. Most fellows are in the OR cutting everyday. Very few fellowships have a nice blend of OR and clinic time. I find my clinic experiences the most nerve wracking because I am following my surgical patients from start to finish for the first time for certain procedures. These are experiences you don't get in residency training and even in fellowship training. If do not have a brain in your head it doesn't matter what fellowship you do. One year fellowship doesn't make up for three years of sub-optimal residency training. The above statement is so over exaggerated. Nothing is more imperative to your career than real life experience on your own. Having your hand held or being the fellowship directors personal assist in the OR or pumping out papers for them is overblown/over-exaggerated experience.

    Fellowship training doesn't make or break your career in podiatry. It also doesn't make or break you when applying for a hospital job. If you want to work at a large academic center then def do a diabetic limb salvage fellowship, it is your only shot. But a small community hospital doesn't need your services nor does it have the resources for you to conduct your research. So those hospital jobs are up for grabs for well trained DPMs who want them and they can provide a real need for the hospital.
     
  19. dtrack22

    dtrack22 Podiatrist 7+ Year Member

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    Some of us did...
     
    NatCh and I post PRN like this.
  20. Ankle Breaker

    Ankle Breaker Senior Member Podiatrist 7+ Year Member

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    haha. very few do. How many people do we know who did fellowships to get "clinic exposure"?
     
  21. dtrack22

    dtrack22 Podiatrist 7+ Year Member

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    Practice management fellowship...

    hahahahahahahahahaha
     

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