Aug 25, 2016
5
0
Status
Podiatry Student
I am a first year podiatry student who has determined (admittedly a bit late) that my interest in medicine is larger than just the foot and ankle. I decided with podiatry initially due to an interest in surgery.

My cGPA is 3.30, sGPA is 3.20 and MCAT is 29 (9B, 10P, 10V)

These include retakes.

ECS include teaching English abroad for a year, shadowing and volunteering at a hospital.

Had a rocky patch in undergrad due to personal issues that have been resolved. Podiatry school conversely is going well and although the first semester isn't over and final scores have not been determined, I have generally been in the upper regions of class rank. 3.5-4.0 looks realistic.

Assuming I get a DO LOR, would my status as a podiatry student disadvantage me? Do I have a reasonable shot at any decent programs?

EDIT: Tweaked the GPA numbers. Calculated my DO GPA incorrectly.
 
Last edited:

Action Bronson

Ill with the Phonics
2+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2016
3
2
Status
Pre-Medical
I have questions.
Have you applied during a previous medical school admissions cycle?
Are you planning to finish DPM and then apply or drop out?

If you are planning to drop out that is a huge red flag IMO. Especially if you previously applied MD or DO.
If were being honest you likely had this feeling all along. You would have a tough time convincing me (and by extension adcoms) that you had this epiphany about podiatry half way through your first semester of basic science courses.

For better or worse you made a commitment to your podiatry school. Dropping out after the first semester would show poor judgement (in taking the DPM acceptance in the first place, when your really didn't want it) and an unwillingness to follow through once you commit to something.

Why should an adcom consider you for DO when it's possible that you will "determine that my interest in medicine is larger than DO" and then quit to try to get into MD school. Yes I know that it's not the same thing but would likely be a genuine concern.
 
OP
D
Aug 25, 2016
5
0
Status
Podiatry Student
I have questions.
Have you applied during a previous medical school admissions cycle?
Are you planning to finish DPM and then apply or drop out?

If you are planning to drop out that is a huge red flag IMO. Especially if you previously applied MD or DO.
If were being honest you likely had this feeling all along. You would have a tough time convincing me (and by extension adcoms) that you had this epiphany about podiatry half way through your first semester of basic science courses.

For better or worse you made a commitment to your podiatry school. Dropping out after the first semester would show poor judgement (in taking the DPM acceptance in the first place, when your really didn't want it) and an unwillingness to follow through once you commit to something.

Why should an adcom consider you for DO when it's possible that you will "determine that my interest in medicine is larger than DO" and then quit to try to get into MD school. Yes I know that it's not the same thing but would likely be a genuine concern.
Thank you for your response. I had never applied to MD or DO. I went with DPM from the beginning. Your points are what I had feared. I will say I went with Podiatry because I thought it was a good fit, and I agree that dropping out after taking a DPM acceptance would look bad. I certainly wish I could redo that decision.

I was wondering if there was a way to switch over but I suppose I may need to go forward with a DPM degree.
 

Cardboard101

2+ Year Member
Jun 5, 2015
500
262
Status
Medical Student
Just to chip in here, a fair number of schools will only take MCATs 3 years old or less. If you're planning to apply next cycle (2017), you'll need to retake. If you are planning to apply this year, I would secure a DO LOR and apply as soon as possible.
 
OP
D
Aug 25, 2016
5
0
Status
Podiatry Student
Just to chip in here, a fair number of schools will only take MCATs 3 years old or less. If you're planning to apply next cycle (2017), you'll need to retake. If you are planning to apply this year, I would secure a DO LOR and apply as soon as possible.
Thanks for the response. Would this apply if I took the MCAT Jan. 2015?
 

Cardboard101

2+ Year Member
Jun 5, 2015
500
262
Status
Medical Student
It depends, some schools want a MCAT taken no earlier than 3 years prior to matriculation date. If you apply 2017, your matriculation date will be Aug/Sept 2018.
 

kelminak

7+ Year Member
Jan 16, 2012
1,004
861
Status
Medical Student
OP
D
Aug 25, 2016
5
0
Status
Podiatry Student
Thanks for the valuable information. Does anyone else have any input as to my chances?

Staying on top of my schoolwork is difficult enough as is and I'd prefer not to spend a lot of time on applying to medical schools (I've done it once for podiatry schools so I know how much time is required to put together an application) unless I had a reasonable chance of getting an acceptance. I'm really flexible about which school I go to, just as long as I have a reasonable chance of an acceptance at a reasonable school.

Not to mention I'd probably have to drop out before the interview cycle since I have no idea how I'd be able to pull that off while in school.

Thanks for any help.
 
OP
D
Aug 25, 2016
5
0
Status
Podiatry Student
I contacted some schools to get a response from them with regards to my status as a first year podiatry student. The general impression I've gotten is that it isn't necessarily a bad thing in and of itself, but that I would be required to submit a letter from my dean indicating that I am in good standing as well as a good explanation for the change.

I suppose nobody here would know, but is it likely that obtaining such a letter would essentially ruin my relationship with my school? This would be an issue if I were to, say, be rejected from all medical schools. If I were to decide to stay in podiatry school as a back-up to that scenario, this could be problematic.
 

Frogger27

2+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2016
1,789
3,309
Status
Medical Student
It may be problematic, but so is working a career your whole life that you do not enjoy