Nov 1, 2010
1
0
Status
Non-Student
First off I am not a doctor or a med student or anything of the sort. I am on this site hoping that someone here can answer my questions.

I recently applied for the military and was denied because of my vision. I received ICL surgery and my vision is near perfect but apparently I'm disqualified because my pre-surgery diopter is -12.50. DoD policy says it can't be worse than -8.00 or something. I'm not a doctor, but I've looked at my medical records and it looks like my vision was -12.50 if I'm looking at the correct number.

So my questions are

1. What is significant about +8.00 or -8.00? Why is that the most they will accept?

2. If I have already had a successful surgery and successful recovery, why does it matter what my vision was prior to surgery? I had surgery done so my poor vision would never haunt me again but it seems that no matter what I was screwed from the beginning.

I know this site is called "Student Doctor Network" but I figure you guys probably know more than me and there might be somebody here who isn't a student and knows something. Whatever answers you can give me would be greatly appreciated.
 

backrow

60% of the time it works everytime
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Apr 16, 2005
1,701
325
Status
Attending Physician
First off I am not a doctor or a med student or anything of the sort. I am on this site hoping that someone here can answer my questions.

I recently applied for the military and was denied because of my vision. I received ICL surgery and my vision is near perfect but apparently I'm disqualified because my pre-surgery diopter is -12.50. DoD policy says it can't be worse than -8.00 or something. I'm not a doctor, but I've looked at my medical records and it looks like my vision was -12.50 if I'm looking at the correct number.

So my questions are

1. What is significant about +8.00 or -8.00? Why is that the most they will accept?

2. If I have already had a successful surgery and successful recovery, why does it matter what my vision was prior to surgery? I had surgery done so my poor vision would never haunt me again but it seems that no matter what I was screwed from the beginning.

I know this site is called "Student Doctor Network" but I figure you guys probably know more than me and there might be somebody here who isn't a student and knows something. Whatever answers you can give me would be greatly appreciated.
So I'm not connected with those who made the regulations/standards; however, it is my understanding that the reason the number '8' was chosen is that is around the point that you have increased risk of corneal or other problems. The fact that you had your vision corrected means nothing in regards to your risk of developing other ocular problems.

Hopefully that makes sense (and is correct, maybe a military ophthalmologist or optometrist can chime in)