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Possibility of returning to Canada/US to practice Clinical Psy if grad from EU

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by Daemos, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. Daemos

    Daemos Junior Member
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    So my friend's parents want to ship my friend to Europe to get a masters (then hopefully a phd) in psychology.

    My friend is currently an international student studying in Canada, they would perfer to stay in Canada, as they would like to practice here and work here as a clinical psychologist.

    The only problem is they would need more (undergraduate) schooling to be accepted to a Canadian Masters program, where-as they were already accepted to a masters program in Holland and some place in England (supposedly) which sounds fishy to me as they don't meet the requirements here at all, but they easily met the requirements there.

    This person is feeling the pressure from their parents, and my take the choice, but if they cannot return to practice in Canada they wouldn't find it worth it at all.

    I laid out a plan (as they asked me for advice) that would take ~2 years more (as they need to finish the prereqs and then apply) compared to the european counterparts, but if they work hard getting in to a Masters program in Canada shouldn't be a huge issue for them (I'm not underestimating the program difficulty in Canada, but this person is extremely gifted when it comes to school)

    So I'm trying to figure out what the chances they would beable to finish school in Holland or England, and then come back to Canada to run a practice or work in a hospital.

    Thanks
     
  2. WaitingKills

    WaitingKills Rockstar
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    I've been through a similar dilema.

    I did my undergrad in Canada and my masters in clinical psych in Australia. I was accepted into a Ph.D there, but it would not be recognized here.

    My suggestion is to look at the provincial lisencing board for which she would want recognition. They all have similar, but different requirements. Then compare those requirements to what the programs in Holland and Europe offer/provide.

    When I was going through this last year (debating on finishing my doctorate in Australia or come home to do it) the boards themselves were less than helpful and wouldn't tell me anything until my degree was finished and they could see my transcripts. I didn't want to risk it, especially after checking into the requirements.

    My advice for doing doctoral level work, if she is that bright and confident that she would be accepted into a Canadian or American university after completing the requirements for admission here, take the extra couple of years and do it here.

    She will save a heap of money and not have the worry of whether her qualifications will be accepted when she is done. Oh ya, I was also told by the BC board that they couldn't tell me anything in the middle of my degree (masters) as requirements change and may not be the same when I am finished. In other words, it may look acceptable now, but in a year it could be a different story.

    This post is quite drifty, but another thought... She could also ask the school she has been accepted to if anyone there has ever graduated and tried to/been able to register in North America.

    Again, I don't know anything about these countries and their programs, but from someone who has been overseas to get a masters in cliniclal psych, research research research.

    Just a thought now...

    Why would it take her so long to meet the admission requirements to a master's/Ph.D? What did she do her undergrad in?
     
  3. OP
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    Daemos

    Daemos Junior Member
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    Thanks for your help.

    For as why she didn't meet the requirements, that's a long story, there are just some courses she needs to take, along with the GRE (which she HAS NOT TAKEN) so this is why I feel those schools she got accepted into are really shady schools that might not even be classified as good there, but I could be wrong.

    That and if she stays here she has the opportunity to do alot of research with a pretty famous psychologist, which she would take up the chance, thus slowing down her course work, but it would be a good reference. I have no doubt in my mind if she works hard for the 2 years (which she is quite bright) she will get in.
     
  4. Logic Prevails

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    Yeah, I agree with everything posted above. The US and Canada have the most stringent requirements for being a psychologist. I'm pretty sure you can get a "doctorate" in psychology in 3 years (including a masters) in europe. There is no way that any province would accept that in Canada, however they would likely allow her to be a "psychological associate" or whatever they call masters level clinicians in the province she will be returning to. My gut feeling is that she is going to have to stick it out and get the requirements to do it here - if she wants to do doctoral level work.

    Personally, I would advise her to apply to med school and then go into psychiatry - the payoffs are much greater in the end (try double your income) and might only take you an extra year.
     
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  5. WaitingKills

    WaitingKills Rockstar
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    I agree with Logic. If she can stand blood and likes med stuff, go into psychiatry. From what I've been reading here, med school is also easier to get into.

    As for the GRE, your friend will have to take them eventually anyway to get into the Ph.D. The requirement is not waived because she will have a masters (unfortunately).
     
  6. OP
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    Daemos

    Daemos Junior Member
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    She is an international student so getting into a medical school is pretty much impossible.

    She also dislikes psychiatrists, she met too many who never did CBT and went straight to drugs wjen it was not absolutely needed.

    Medicine (the field I am pursuing) is quite a bit different than Psychology. To my knowledge Psychologists and Psychiatrists do very different things with the same goal in mind.
     
  7. Logic Prevails

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    My advice - don't be one of those

    The background is different, but the goal is near the same. I think if clinical psychology has a future, then it will move toward a more medical model. You also want to think about how stable the profession is right now in how it perceives its role - in Canada, this is particularly sketchy... individual provinces can't even agree on a standard for licensure or whether they should raise the bar or lower it... it's a freaking mess - If I were to do it over, I would go to med school, but it doesn't sound like that is possible?
     
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  8. OP
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    Daemos

    Daemos Junior Member
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    Medical School is impossible for a international student. The only school I know of that accepts international students to apply for med is U of T. And to my knowledge they haven't accepted one (to get in) for a while now.
     

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