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Possible to get "MD" degree from Irish schools

Discussion in 'UK & Ireland' started by ftcnt, May 2, 2007.

  1. ftcnt

    ftcnt Junior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Oct 29, 2004
    I know that the Irish med schools offer different degrees

    "Degrees Awarded

    In Ireland, successful candidates are awarded a total of three degrees upon their graduation from medical school: Medicine (MB), Surgery (BCh), and Obstetrics (BAO). These are the equivalent of the M.D. which is awarded in the USA and Canada. "

    but is it possible to get the MD if one does additional research and submits a thesis ? I've read and heard about this being an option...thanks
     
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  3. medgirl20

    medgirl20 Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Mar 22, 2005
    MD requires at least one year full time research after completion of your medical degree.
     
  4. Sage880

    Sage880 Senior Member 5+ Year Member

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    Jun 7, 2004
    Canada
    Their MD is a higher degree then the North American one. So if you have the Irish degree MB, BCh, BAO you can, and are expected to, use the title MD back home without additional work since they are equivilant. No one back in North America knows what the other degree means. Is that what you were worried about?
     
  5. ftcnt

    ftcnt Junior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Oct 29, 2004
    essentially yes. However, I know physicians that have graduated from schools that give provide a degree other than MD and that is what they write next to their names. Although, I realize the Irish MB, BCh, CAO is equivalent, i'm wondering if I were to get the MD, it would be one year after finishing medical school ?
     
  6. ramekin

    ramekin Junior Member 5+ Year Member

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    Feb 17, 2006
    It would be whenever you decide to embark on your own research and the availability of research posts in the area of your interest and whether or not you'd be a competitive candidate for those studentships. I believe most doctors undertake research for higher degrees (MD or PhD) once they begin to specialise (so 2-4 years after finishing medical school) and it takes one year full-time and two or more years if studied part-time.
     
  7. ftcnt

    ftcnt Junior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Oct 29, 2004
    im just thinking that if one is to finish med school and then go to north america for residency, such a thing would be not possible. ok its good to know the options out there. has anyone done or head of someone completing their MD and then going to residency in Canada or the US?
     
  8. Trinners

    Trinners Universitas Dubliniensis 10+ Year Member

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    May 27, 2002
    Dublin, Ireland
    The Doctor in Medicine degree is an unsupervised research degree that takes a minimum of 1 year but usually 2-3 years of research. You cannot present a thesis for this degree until 3 years have passed since you've got your primary medical qualification.

    The universities usually won't accept registration for the MD degree unless you're a Registrar in one of the teaching hospitals associated with the university.

    To be honest I'm not sure why a North American would want to complete an MD before returning for residency in the US. The degree does not mean much outside the UK/Ireland. Getting as far as a Registrar in Ireland means doing an internship and 2 years of SHO in a scheme and then sitting the membership in surgery (MRCS) or in medicine (MRCPI). All these additional qualifications are essentially worthless in the US!
     
  9. ftcnt

    ftcnt Junior Member 10+ Year Member

    54
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    Oct 29, 2004
    thanks for the helpful info
     

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