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Postponing Medical school after being accepted

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by A-DOG, Apr 11, 2000.

  1. A-DOG

    A-DOG Member

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    I was accepted to Med school in the fall. Previously, in anticipation of rejection, I applied to some graduate programs in liberal studies. As a Bio major who will complete college in three years, I wish I would've taken more humanities classes. I think a better understanding of the natural and social forces that underly an individuals personal identity will contribute to making me the best doctor I can be. An M.A. in liberal studies at Fordham U. is one year in duration. If I called NYCOM, and asked if I could postpone my admission for one year, would that be OK? Or should I just be happy that I was accepted when so many others are not?
     
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  3. NYCOM doesn't grant Deferrals. If you weren't prepared to attend Medical School (because of your interest in pursuing a Masters degree), then why did you apply?
     
  4. Duo Degree

    Duo Degree Member

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    why doesnt NYCOM accept deferrals? alot of people, such as myself and maybe the original poster, may have been waitlisted or unsure of acceptance. in that case, it was important to make sure i was doing something that was worthwhile if i did not get accepted. i knew that i didnt want to sit around working part-time jobs or re-taking courses or other things to pass the time. i ruled out post bacc classes to improve my GPA because i wanted a long term solution in the case i would not get into medical school. im just curious as to why NYCOM has this policy and their rationale.

    to the original poster-
    if it is going to cost you an acceptance into medical school, i wouldnt risk it personally. good luck.
     
  5. DuoDegree, what "rationale" are you referring to? Are you condemning the administration at NYCOM for wanting to enlist serious students that are committed to studying Medicine at their school (and therefore reluctant to grant requests for Deferrals)? Perhaps the Office has experiences situations in which accepted students have tried to Defer for one year intenful upon re-applying to other New York schools. I'm sure motives such as that are disappointing to NYCOM's staff, and reasonably so.

    A-DOG, try to reconcile your doubts about beginning your Medical education at NYCOM. Do you really want to re-apply and compete with a new applicant pool?
     
  6. Jkeum22985

    Jkeum22985 Member

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    I feel that it maybe a waste of time really.

    If I were the admission committee I would not accept your response.
    There are many out there who are willing to take your spot and they are ready to tackle the challenges of coming years..

    It is wrong to think that many courses in liberal art can improve your humanistic perspective on medicine. Medicine is a very dynamic field, as soon as you get your feet wet on hallways of a hospital then you will know what is like to face daily dilemmas of human illness and social issues around it.

    I can't really understand of those who love to delay action...who loves to go around and chase cats and dogs on all wrong places.

    Wake up and call NYCOM and tell them I am starting this fall..

    Sincerely,

    Jacob Keum
    4th year NYCOM
    Your future attending

     
  7. Duo Degree

    Duo Degree Member

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    what would lead you to believe i was "condemning" the rationale? i was merely asking a question and if your answer is that perhaps the admissions committee has been burned too many times, then i can certainly understand that.

    regardless, i personally think every school should have a policy of deferment for students. couldnt the school fill up the slot for that year and then have one less slot to fill the following year? if it is an issue of commitment, would they suggest that all waitlisted students either quit whatever they are doing or not plan on anything beyond medical school until they have been officially denied. once again, i am not criticizing NYCOM nor other schools that have a similar policy. I would just like to get an understanding of reasons against a student deferring. to me, it just seems that there are some legitimate reasons for waiting until the next year.
     
  8. Duo Degree

    Duo Degree Member

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    ALSO...it seemed to me that the last poster has a somewhat egocentric viewpoint of medicine. do you really think that having a liberal arts background would not help your dilemmas in medicine? i propose that any experience and educational background will help you either directly or indirectly with patient care. relating to different personalities and backgrounds of patients AND nurses AND lots of other individuals that contribute to the care of a patient is helpful. walking through the halls of a hospital gives you only a glimpse bc there is a whole lot of issues that a physician is not always aware of. now, i dont know the original posters exact situation, but i wouldnt be too quick to judge the person.

    by the way, what exactly did you mean by the cat and dog example?
     
  9. Jkeum22985

    Jkeum22985 Member

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    if you want to do philosophy you are more suited in attending a graduate program in social policy.

    As you know, our lifespan is pretty constrained and we have to learn to maximize our time. I don't have anything against a student requesting a year deferment for family situations or other pressing personal matters but I think a masters in liberal arts do not make more insightful in the field of medicine. And, I am not sure what level of medical preparation you have as of now, but I can tell you sooner you get involved with patient care more aware we are going to be not only of medical issues but social issues as well. It has been more than dozen times in which I had to battle with social service for appropriate supportive care for my patients. This means getting them the help they will need once they leave my care. As you can see being a good Doctor will teach your valuable lessons in humanity, socioeconomic issues.

    I repeat you are entitled to your opinion, but medicine is experience based field. I would not waste any time on any other endeavors.
    Just do it DO

    Jacob Keum
    4th year NYCOM
    Future Neurosurgeon
     
  10. Duo Degree

    Duo Degree Member

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    I agree that medicine is experienced based, but the experience can extend to beyond a physician's perspective. Besides, I thought that the osteopathic philosophy/schools celebrated individuals of different backgrounds and experience. It just seems to me that supporting an individual's interest in other studies would validate the osteopathic schools' stress on a well-rounded person. But as I have said to the original poster, if NYCOM truly will not let you defer AND you really want to become a physician then you should accept!
     
  11. jmor702

    jmor702 Member

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    duodegree is certainly impressed with his own opinion. Maybe that is why he feels it so important to get a degree in some humanistic field, because he so little knowledge himself.

    If A-Dog didn't want to go to med school in the fall, my question is ,"Did you send back your acceptance to the school?" If you did, go to school. If you feel so strongly in getting your masters first, then do that and reapply to med school when appropriate to do so.
     
  12. A-DOG

    A-DOG Member

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    First, I don't think that an individual should be looked upon as unserious about a career in medicine for wanting broaden his/her educational backround before attending medical school. I certainly don't think this should be looked upon as a waste of time. I believe taking classes such as death and dying, biomedical ethics, and policy & propaganda will broaden my experiences as a person. I cannot believe that others can judge what will contribute to making "me" a better doctor. I mean, is there some golden rule which states what a doctor should and should not do to become a better doctor. I think learning about other cultures and different perspectives on the world is extremely important for a physician. Didn't Galen say the best doctor would also be a philosopher? I worked my ass off to get into medical school, and I think people who think I am "unsure" take into consideration that oneof the most important parts of being a physician is interacting and learning from our fellow human beings. I love the liberal studies program because it allows one to look at the fundamental questions concerning us a people; not as biological organisms or statistical figures. I hope that we as physicians never lose sight of the "person/patient." I am an individual who thinks that a broad educational experience will open my mind. I want to learn about others, so I don't subconciously or conciously pass judgement on them. Likewise, I hope others will not pass judgement on me. I will attend medical school in Fall 2000. After, if I'm not totally burnt out, I plan to go to school part time to earn an M.A. in liberal studies.
     
  13. Jkeum22985

    Jkeum22985 Member

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    good decision!!!

    You will see as soon as you are sitting for exams in NYCOm that you are going to be quick to forget about your prior uncertainty.

    Now, you can go around trying to do phylosophy all you want but the buttom line is you can not guarantee that by having a MA in liberal arts field can make you a better doctor. I can assure you about this statement.

    Your Senior
    Jacob Keum
     
  14. Duo Degree

    Duo Degree Member

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    jmor702-

    my opinion is my own...and certainly not intended to impress myself or others. and fyi, my second degree is a masters in healthcare administration (MHA)and not a liberal arts degree as you have assumed. hopefully, when i get into the hospital(during clinical rotations and residency), ill be able to understand the dynamics of the hospital and the healthcare industry. i spend plenty of time on the patient floors in the 600-bed hospital that i work at and spend lots of time in executive meetings with our CEO at the corporate level(which owns 16 hospitals) and the hospital level. so i think i have a pretty good perspective, and im certainly glad my school allowed me a chance to have this experience and complete me other degree...i dont think itll hurt my future...do you?
     

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