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Pre-Allo Doubt

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by rampagez99, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. rampagez99

    rampagez99 New Member

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    Hey guys, I have recently begun developing a doubt as to whether or not I want to become a doctor, due to the massive difficulty ahead as well as my being really good with computers and relative enjoyment I get out of dealing with them.

    My stats are very good MCAT and GPA wise so aside from me needing some volunteering I should have no problem getting in somewhere(late application this cycle aside), but I was wondering if any of you have experienced this kind of doubt, and how you got through it.. if you did.

    Thanks :)
     
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  3. kakaboro

    kakaboro Junior Member

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    Not to sound like an ass but it sounds like you're afraid of working hard to be a doctor. If this is the case you need to reevaluate your dedication to the profession- I for one cannot see myself doing any other kind of work, no matter how hard it is. If you're afraid and like computers then toss a coin in the air...
     
  4. Tired Pigeon

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    Why not try something with computers and see where it takes you? Anything you're really good at that you enjoy dealing with is something worth pursuing. You may find that you love it & make tons of money. Or, you may find that the idea of medicine is still there ... in which case, you can always go to med school then.

    The problem with doing med school if you're not sure about it is that you come out so deeply in debt you pretty much lose the option to change careers, at least until you get those loans paid off.
     
  5. Tired Pigeon

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    :confused: :confused: :confused: How did you get this out of the OP's post?
     
  6. MirrorTodd

    MirrorTodd It's a gas.
    Physician

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    You can do eeeeeeeeeeet!!!
     
  7. gotmeds?

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    Famous last words. You have to have pretty stellar stats to get into med school without any clinical experience or community service.
     
  8. ssquared

    ssquared Member

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    I have a couple of friends in the same situation: they're competitive applicants (in some cases, have some acceptances already), did all the pre-med stuff, yet doubt the decision to go to med school. My suggestion? Take a year off. Do something with computers, or anything really, and see you how feel. When you get up every day thinking about med school and how badly you want to be a doctor, THAT'S when you go to medical school. Med school isn't camp, it's a huge (hence, pretty much life-long) committment. There's no shame in waiting a year: it's only a year. You're probably, what, 20 or 21? If you live the average life expectancy that means you have 60+ years ahead of you. Taking one for yourself and figuring out what you want to do is probably the best thing you can do for yourself and your future.
     
  9. rampagez99

    rampagez99 New Member

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    Hard working is generally not a problem for me, at my job or in my science classes so that is not the issue as Tired Pigeon pointed out :), and it isnt a coin/flip situation .. though it would be an idea to pursue computers and come back to medicine I am afraid of loosing time persuing an inevitably empty(though immediatly enjoyable)existance.

    Primarily I was wondering if anyone was ever on the fence, and then was pushed over by a particular thought or revalation to the medical side..

    :)
     
  10. johnnydrama

    johnnydrama I'm no Superman

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    Work for a year or two before making your decision. That gives you time to add some volunteering, as well as gives you the chance to decide if working with computers is enough for you. Hey, maybe you'll be the guy who ends up writing a program that makes radiologists obsolete. :p
     
  11. rampagez99

    rampagez99 New Member

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    lol you guys are fast

    Taking a year off is definatly a good idea, maybe do both computers and medical things(volunteering etc) and see whats better.. but since I am on two waitlists and waiting to hear back from an interview I dont know if it would be worth it decling an acceptance(optimism) for this doubt..
     
  12. jjmack

    jjmack Senior Member

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    if you are doubting yourself before you even start you will never finish. do something else medical training it way too long.
     
  13. rampagez99

    rampagez99 New Member

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    jjmac, life is full of doubts and decisions if one subscribed to your logic and abandoned a situation in times of doubt one might miss many very good things in order to avoid several mistakes
     
  14. CareerBaffled

    CareerBaffled New Member

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    You can't imagine doing any other kind of work? Come on, that seems a bit ridiculous. Of the millions of other possible careers, not one other career would be acceptable?

    I don't really understand this mindset, and it seem common among premeds. Just because you have second thoughts from time to time does not mean you are not fit to be a doctor. Some people imply that the people who really want to be doctors have known forever and never waver on their dream. It's natural, and I think advisable, to consider other options. After all, I (and the OP I assume) am very young. How the hell am I supposed to know what I want to do for the next 60 years?

    My advice is to get some more volunteering experience, which can either help you in applying to med school, or help you to realize that medicine isn't for you. Maybe. Who knows. You'll probably be happy in either career choice.
     
  15. jjmack

    jjmack Senior Member

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    true, but if you are doubting medicine now I say do something else it's not worth the hassle unless you are really comitted. There are too many hoops and long weeks studying.
     
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  17. Krisss17

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    I think many have doubts, but not because of the amount of work involved, but they realize serious commitment involved. If one knows without a doubt, medicine is for them...all the best to them, go ahead and pursue it. On the otherhand, there is nothing wrong with taking a break, especially if you are considered a traditional student and you are only now 20 or 21. Don't make any rash decisions, if any of those waitlist positions becomes acceptable...but find out if there is a deferment possibility.

    The only thing I can really suggest to the OP is to look introspectively, because only you can make this decision.

    Kris
     
  18. kakaboro

    kakaboro Junior Member

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    Thats the truth.

    as for me- i could imagine being a PA or RN..but MD trumps it all- responsibility and training above all the rest- thats something I aspire to achieve.. that being said thats just my opinion of course- other people are perhaps thinking about grad school in bio, med school, pa school, pt school, teaching, or whatever computer science, art, music on the same level who knows, thats just not how my mind works.
     
  19. NonTradMed

    NonTradMed Perpetual Student

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    I was a software engineer for a couple of years before starting med school. I was not ready for the long road of med school and choose to work after graduation. Working really helped to put everything in perspective and I realized I really did want to do medical school. A job can be a refreshing change of environment that you may need to make up your mind. Go to work for a year and then decide. If you get in, defer for a year.
     
  20. Tired Pigeon

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    Rampage, what is your gut telling you? Some decisions are way too important to make based on logic;) .

    FWIW, I did not go straight from undergrad to med school -- I pursued other interests and was actually fairly successful & happy with what I did. I did eventually come back to medicine, but I can't say I regret a single thing about the path I've taken to get here, or about getting here 'late'.
     
  21. Critical Mass

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    Like the two posters above me, I was also a different sort of professional before med school.

    If you have doubts, get some more experience before taking the plunge.
     
  22. NickRiviera

    NickRiviera MS-Never

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    Nope, you're an ass. How did you even get this from the OPs post?

    :thumbup:

    This is way off base. How did you also get this from the OPs post?

    :thumbdown:

    :thumbup:
     
  23. brianmartin

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    I have doubts. Lot's of people have doubts. It's only the people who've never DONE anything else, or imagined anything else, who think they were "meant to" be a doctor. We are all smart, educated people, who could probably do just about anything we set our minds to. Yet for some reason we've chosen to go down this path. It is a big commitment, so naturally we are apprehensive. I think the best way to alleviate your doubt is to gain some clinical exposure. It's very difficult to feel good about your decision if you've never had any contact with patients or worked in a healthcare setting.

    Remember, many med-students and residents currently doubt their decision to enter med school (according to the thread "would you do it over again?").

    My uncle, now a chief of urology...suffered from "imposter syndrome" for 10 years after he graduated from med school. He told me once:

    "Even after my residency was done, I still felt like one day, someone was going to walk into the OR, tap me on the shoulder, and inform me that in reality I never passed medical school, and that I wasn't really qualified to practice medicine. Well, that never happened, but I really thought it was going to...for a long time."

    And this is coming from one of the smartest, best doctors I know of. You just have to realize that if you do pursue medicine, you aren't going to feel like a professional until probably 10 years into your practice. As long as you keep that in mind, you'll be OK. Don't let it bother you, because it's the same for everyone.
     
  24. OncoCaP

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    Like several people have said here ... get out and live life a little. Being in school gives you such a warped perspective of the working world. You can always go back if this is what you want to do and are qualified for it. Get to know your likes and dislikes a bit more by working and that should help some.

    The big problem in my mind is that it is really hard to know what it would be like to become a physician because there are so many different specialties (and you can't know exactly which one you will wind up in) and you can't just "try it" for a year or two. On the other hand, there are many specialities, so there might just be one or more that you would like.

    It's not until MS3 when you get some decent first-hand exposure to the medical profession, and by then it's more or less too late to make a graceful exit. It's one thing to watch someone do their job; it's a lot different when you are the one doing it (like watching someone take a final exam versus sitting there taking the exam yourself). Talking to physicians, volunteering or working as an EMT, nurse, or tech is maybe the closest you can get. At some point you've thought it over and it's time to take a chance that has been carefully considered by your favorite decision algorithm or go do something else. Maybe you could write a computer program to analyze your doubts ;).
     
  25. polofanPKP

    polofanPKP Fear the Vest

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    I think the best advice given is to take a year off. I took a year off to pursue research interests in Europe and found that it opened my eyes to what I didn't want to do and fueled my determination to enter med school. I also didn't start out as a pre-med major, I was an electrical engineer. But I found that when electronics were broken down to their building blocks I didn't find them interesting, and if I didn't find the foundation of the career interesting then it obviously wasn't for me. I started in bio-engineering and found that the biological aspect was far more interesting so I dropped the engineering entirely. As I became more involved with bio, then research, then shadowing in Hem/Onc, I found that medicine had what I was looking for in a career. I have always been worried about people that know at 6 that they are going to be a doctor, as was stated earlier it is important to experience different things. Not just because I believe it gives you a more unique life experience but because it can help you find out what you do not want in life, this in turn can guide you to a profession based on more than just an emotional desire. I fear that people that don't experience anything outside of pre-med will end up burning their candle at both ends, desire can take you far, but if desire forces you to ignore other careers that you may enjoy more then it is a far greater detriment than a benefit.
     
  26. 8744

    8744 Guest

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    Amen. There are some mornings when I lay in bed stunned as the clock rolls over to 0500 wishing I were in any other profession, especially one where I could call in sick or occasionally goof off all day. And then duty and the fear of my children starving heaves me out of bed, I get going with the day, and I usually tolerate it well enough even though, and I'm warning you guys, not trying to dissuade you, residency training blows on almost every level.
     
  27. OncoCaP

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    Panda, I hope you write a book and make millions. The extra cash would take the edge off your residency because you literally could just walk out the door and never come back if you wanted to.
     
  28. Adcadet

    Adcadet Long way from Gate 27

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    I thought I had the stamina for med school without question, but I tell ya, dealing with a mean-spirited resident on my surgery rotation while doing HER rounds at 4 am after sleeping for 15 minutes and knowing full well that there was zero chance of me getting home within the required 30 hours really was a trial. You had better like at least some parts of what you're doing.
     

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