lilmiscassie92

7+ Year Member
Mar 14, 2010
70
11
Status
This is my 4th year. I have a strong science background and will be getting my psychology degree this coming summer. I have decided to switch to psyD after realizing I had no desire to be a physician and my main interest was practicing psychotherapy. I'm doing research right now, and if I stay in the research lab by the time I apply in the 2015 cycle I will have over 2 years experience in the same lab. I don't have a ton of clinical experience, only over 110 hours in a pediatric ER; however, the hospital wasn't in the best area of town, so there was always a social worker on site and I would sometimes have to "babysit" while he interviewed the parents. The ER also included a few psychiatric evaluation rooms with cameras, and I was constantly exposed to a wide range of patients like teens with drug addictions, those who were being sexually and physically abused, etc. I have other extracurriculars and volunteer experience but those were mostly pre-med related. I'm wondering what else I would need to do to make myself a competitive applicant? I have about a 3.767 GPA overall, and I am currently taking winter break to study for the GRE. Should I get a volunteer position in a psychiatric ward? Do I need to do research in a second lab or will the research experience I have suffice?
 
Jan 25, 2011
206
12
Status
  1. Psychology Student
.... why not a PhD? (If you're doing research, I'm going to assume you've researched the real differences between the two degrees.)
 

WisNeuro

Board Certified Neuropsychologist
Feb 15, 2009
12,309
12,679
Somewhere
Status
  1. Psychologist
Yeah, I echo that advice, go the PhD route. Not only will you likely get more clinical experience than Psy.D, but you'll have some solid research as well. Trust me, much easier to get an internship spot with some presentations and maybe a pub under your belt.
 
About the Ads

xXIDaShizIXx

7+ Year Member
Sep 18, 2011
1,936
41
Status
  1. Other Health Professions Student
OP, do NOT say that research is icky. They will hound you about it. :D But in all seriousness, if you just want to practice, look for an APA accredited program with an internship match rate of I'd say at least 75%.
 

PhillyPsych

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2009
31
0
Philadelphia
Status
  1. Psychology Student
Yeah, I echo that advice, go the PhD route. Not only will you likely get more clinical experience than Psy.D, but you'll have some solid research as well. Trust me, much easier to get an internship spot with some presentations and maybe a pub under your belt.

Cassie,

I would caution you to take this advice with a grain of salt, different programs offer very different training experiences and should be evaluated on a case to case basis. If you did want to make a wide generalization (which I would caution against) Psy.D. programs are known to provide a wide range of clinical training opportunities, while traditional Ph.D. programs often have a strong focus on research. Additionally, it depends on the specific sub-specialty the person is interested in and their ultimate career goals. I would suggest investigating programs that really seem to interest you, and base your decision on what sites you feel you have a good "fit" with (paired with a high internship match rate, as someone previously mentioned 75% or more to APA accredited sites is good). I also echo the above advice related to Wis's comment on what internships are looking for. I have reviewed internship applications for a top tier accredited program and to be honest, publications and presentations really don't play as large a role as one would think (unless you are applying for programs that specifically focus on research like UCLA or Mass General). More often than not the quality and quantity of your overall training experiences are the most important factor, paired with your interpersonal style. I think the myth related to publications comes from the fact that they are often highly correlated with other factors common to high quality applicants (e.g., quality of training, competitive externship placements, diverse experiecnes, etc...). Though as we know, correlations merely imply a relationship NOT causation. Hope this helps.

-PhillyPsych
 
Aug 26, 2011
830
496
USA
Status
  1. Psychology Student
Cassie,

I would caution you to take this advice with a grain of salt, different programs offer very different training experiences and should be evaluated on a case to case basis. If you did want to make a wide generalization (which I would caution against) Psy.D. programs are known to provide a wide range of clinical training opportunities, while traditional Ph.D. programs often have a strong focus on research. Additionally, it depends on the specific sub-specialty the person is interested in and their ultimate career goals. I would suggest investigating programs that really seem to interest you, and base your decision on what sites you feel you have a good "fit" with (paired with a high internship match rate, as someone previously mentioned 75% or more to APA accredited sites is good). I also echo the above advice related to Wis's comment on what internships are looking for. I have reviewed internship applications for a top tier accredited program and to be honest, publications and presentations really don't play as large a role as one would think (unless you are applying for programs that specifically focus on research like UCLA or Mass General). More often than not the quality and quantity of your overall training experiences are the most important factor, paired with your interpersonal style. I think the myth related to publications comes from the fact that they are often highly correlated with other factors common to high quality applicants (e.g., quality of training, competitive externship placements, diverse experiecnes, etc...). Though as we know, correlations merely imply a relationship NOT causation. Hope this helps.

-PhillyPsych

There's an abundance of threads discussing the merits of the PsyD vs. the PhD. The 'Who's Happier' thread is a recent one that comes to mind.

I disagree with the statement that PsyD programs offer more extensive clinical training. Obviously this will vary on a case-by-case basis, but APPIC data seems to refute this (again see any of the PhD vs. PsyD threads for citations).

Go to a program that offers funding and has an APA match rate >90% (75% is too low IMO). Research fit will likely play a huge role in your admissions process, so tailor your applications accordingly.
 

xXIDaShizIXx

7+ Year Member
Sep 18, 2011
1,936
41
Status
  1. Other Health Professions Student
There's an abundance of threads discussing the merits of the PsyD vs. the PhD. The 'Who's Happier' thread is a recent one that comes to mind.

I disagree with the statement that PsyD programs offer more extensive clinical training. Obviously this will vary on a case-by-case basis, but APPIC data seems to refute this (again see any of the PhD vs. PsyD threads for citations).

Go to a program that offers funding and has an APA match rate >90% (75% is too low IMO). Research fit will likely play a huge role in your admissions process, so tailor your applications accordingly.

This goes both ways and could lead to a choice in a Psy.D. program as well. Another reason I am saying this debate is useless.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PhillyPsych
This thread is more than 6 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.
About the Ads