premed advising from Harvard med students?

TheMightySmiter

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    Applying and getting into any med school is easy. Have a decent gpa, MCAT, ECs, apply early, and you're good to go.

    Getting into top programs is not easy. With respect, 95% of SDN doesn't know the first thing about getting into top programs, because they applied to them as hail mary's with no hope of admission. Getting insight into what makes people competitive for top tier programs is valuable because so few people get accepted into those programs. Certainly some people on SDN are accepted into top tier programs, but very few.

    Furthermore, the same reason many/most people claim school reputation doesn't matter is because they go to low or unranked schools.

    I wouldn't say getting a 3.7/32 is easy. Some people are naturally inclined to the sciences, and that helps a lot, but most people have to work really hard to get stats like that. Also, at the end of the day, someone accepted to an unranked med school will still be an MD. I think people who go to top schools overexaggerate their advantages because it makes then feel like a special snowflake inside.
     

    drizzt3117

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      I wouldn't say getting a 3.7/32 is easy. Some people are naturally inclined to the sciences, and that helps a lot, but most people have to work really hard to get stats like that. Also, at the end of the day, someone accepted to an unranked med school will still be an MD. I think people who go to top schools overexaggerate their advantages because it makes then feel like a special snowflake inside.

      Idk, obviously you need some basic level of dedication and intelligence to get into and finish med school. That being said, the requirements in and of themselves are pretty lax, and as much is said about qualitative things, the screen isn't all that complete.

      As far as going to top schools; suffice it to say that my experience is that it matters a whole lot if you're going into academics and a good amount even if you're not.
       
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      TheMightySmiter

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        Idk, obviously you need some basic level of dedication and intelligence to get into and finish med school. That being said, the requirements in and of themselves are pretty lax, and as much is said about qualitative things, the screen isn't all that complete.

        As far as going to top schools; suffice it to say that my experience is that it matters a whole lot if you're going into academics and a good amount even if you're not.

        I agree that most people in medicine have a base level of intelligence, but work ethic can take a person of average intellect quite far. The requirements are not impossible, but I wouldn't call them easy. I also think that work ethic tends to matter far more when applying to top schools. For a very intelligent person, it's not at all difficult to do the minimum necessary to get into med school. I've known a number of people in top 20 med schools who were smart, not remarkably so, but more importantly knew how the game worked early on and put in a lot of work to get great numbers, research, and leadership that make one an attractive candidate for top schools. This is where SDN can help you. There is probably a higher percentage of people here accepted to top schools than you'd find in the average university. Especially if you don't go to a top undergrad with advisers whose job it is to get pre-meds into top med schools, I think SDN can be a fantastic resource. You just have to spend enough time here to find out whose is actually good advice.

        In regards to the advantages from top schools, I agree there are some. Academia is one, and residency connections. I would also argue that the people who worked hard enough to be accepted to top schools in the first place tend to already have the ambitions and work ethic necessary to be wildly successful.
         

        GS Mikami

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          Applying and getting into any med school is easy. Have a decent gpa, MCAT, ECs, apply early, and you're good to go.

          Getting into top programs is not easy. With respect, 95% of SDN doesn't know the first thing about getting into top programs, because they applied to them as hail mary's with no hope of admission. Getting insight into what makes people competitive for top tier programs is valuable because so few people get accepted into those programs. Certainly some people on SDN are accepted into top tier programs, but very few.

          Furthermore, the same reason many/most people claim school reputation doesn't matter is because they go to low or unranked schools.

          I think it all depends on how you define top programs. Are we taking about Top 20? Top 10? Top 5?
           

          pm121

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          May 22, 2012
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            this is exactly my point... i post a question on this sdn, hoping to get an answer, and i get a bunch of polarizing answers (some of which are undoubtedly motivated by ego and arrogance rather than reason or data). and i don't know who to trust. so yes, i would trust a current student at a good school who i know went through the process rather than a blog where anyone can sign up and say whatever.

            did anyone legitimately pay for a service and liked/disliked it? or is everyone just jumping on an opportunity to bash on top tier schools (common theme on sdn, i've noticed...). did anyone google 'premed advising' and pay for a service in the top few hits?

            this much i know: a yale undergrad was extraordinarily helpful to me while i was applying to colleges, especially in terms of the personal statement, and im wondering why (some) people here are so against it for grad school apps? it's not that ivy students are necessarily smarter, but they may be good at applying to things in general.

            yes, i agree with some posters that it depends on where im aiming. im looking at middle tier to top tier schools.

            if you're serious about helping me, please do so by addressing the question rather flinging mud/ telling other responders that they'll be on waitlists...

            thanks.
             

            tenndoc

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            Aug 12, 2011
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              this is exactly my point... i post a question on this sdn, hoping to get an answer, and i get a bunch of polarizing answers (some of which are undoubtedly motivated by ego and arrogance rather than reason or data). and i don't know who to trust. so yes, i would trust a current student at a good school who i know went through the process rather than a blog where anyone can sign up and say whatever.

              did anyone legitimately pay for a service and liked/disliked it? or is everyone just jumping on an opportunity to bash on top tier schools (common theme on sdn, i've noticed...). did anyone google 'premed advising' and pay for a service in the top few hits?

              this much i know: a yale undergrad was extraordinarily helpful to me while i was applying to colleges, especially in terms of the personal statement, and im wondering why (some) people here are so against it for grad school apps? it's not that ivy students are necessarily smarter, but they may be good at applying to things in general.

              yes, i agree with some posters that it depends on where im aiming. im looking at middle tier to top tier schools.

              if you're serious about helping me, please do so by addressing the question rather flinging mud/ telling other responders that they'll be on waitlists...

              thanks.
              did the yale kid make you pay him? you are stupid if you pay for advising. thats my "polarizing" opinion and ill stick to it. google is free and you can figure stuff out on your own with no fee
               

              pm121

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                did the yale kid make you pay him? you are stupid if you pay for advising. thats my "polarizing" opinion and ill stick to it. google is free and you can figure stuff out on your own with no fee

                tenndoc, you're the reason people develop the impression that sdn has no credibility. you pontificate with such certainty on matters about which you know little, and you are so quick to brand other members 'stupid'.

                i got into yale because of my friend, and many of my college friends at selective schools found such advice beneficial as well. again, it's not that their intelligence does anything to make me smarter or a better person; it's that they help me angle my application in a certain way so that it has the highest chance of catching the adcom's attention.

                i'm wondering why such a service doesn't exist for professional education like medical school and law school, where the stakes are even higher, and insider information is all the more useful.

                i just looked at kaplan's service, which charges $729 for three hour, which to me is ridiculous...

                i'd like to hear what people other than tenndoc has to say.
                 

                tenndoc

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                Aug 12, 2011
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                  tenndoc, you're the reason people develop the impression that sdn has no credibility. you pontificate with such certainty on matters about which you know little, and you are so quick to brand other members 'stupid'.

                  i got into yale because of my friend, and many of my college friends at selective schools found such advice beneficial as well. again, it's not that their intelligence does anything to make me smarter or a better person; it's that they help me angle my application in a certain way so that it has the highest chance of catching the adcom's attention.

                  i'm wondering why such a service doesn't exist for professional education like medical school and law school, where the stakes are even higher, and insider information is all the more useful.

                  i just looked at kaplan's service, which charges $729 for three hour, which to me is ridiculous...

                  i'd like to hear what people other than tenndoc has to say.
                  haha thats cute, you mad brah? :rolleyes: having gone through the process, im pretty sure that i have a good idea of what is going on. my one regret is that i did not know what i know now earlier in my collegiate career. i would be in much better shape if i did. i dont claim to be an expert but i know enough to be able to not speak out of my ass. ive learned the majority of my info from this site and aamc pubs. but like with everything on the internet, you should double check things and not trust everything you read. ill freely give my opinions on a public forum. if you dont like it, skim over it or ignore it. i really dont give a damn, buddy.

                  you can scroll up a few posts and look at what i said about sdn being a great place for information if you can weed out the stupid posts and trolls and have the ability to read sarcasm (which apparently is a rare trait these days). there is plenty of "insider information" available on this site, which you can find using this nifty little thing called the search function. why pay for it when its at your finger tips...unless you just hate having cash.

                  but back to the original point.... i agree that its good to have those ahead of you reach back to help you, which you did with the yale kid or whatever. i have been both the giver and recipient of this type of help, which you can check with my post history. ive given my help to other posters with their PS and WAMC as well as interview advice. ive received advice on my school list and saved plenty of time/money/headache but cutting out schools. having someone to help your file stick out is great. but don't pay for it. for example, people on here are worried about GPAs. look what a google search pulled up for me.... http://www.usnews.com/education/blo...hen-applying-to-medical-school-with-a-low-gpa. took me 30 seconds and i didnt have to pay a dime.

                  again.... ill stand by my opinion that you(not necessarily you OP) are a ***** if you pay for info that is readily available out there. if you dont like my opinion, you can ignore it or get over it. :cool: have a lovely day
                   

                  jHustle

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                    haha thats cute, you mad brah? :rolleyes: having gone through the process, im pretty sure that i have a good idea of what is going on. my one regret is that i did not know what i know now earlier in my collegiate career. i would be in much better shape if i did. i dont claim to be an expert but i know enough to be able to not speak out of my ass. ive learned the majority of my info from this site and aamc pubs. but like with everything on the internet, you should double check things and not trust everything you read. ill freely give my opinions on a public forum. if you dont like it, skim over it or ignore it. i really dont give a damn, buddy.

                    you can scroll up a few posts and look at what i said about sdn being a great place for information if you can weed out the stupid posts and trolls and have the ability to read sarcasm (which apparently is a rare trait these days). there is plenty of "insider information" available on this site, which you can find using this nifty little thing called the search function. why pay for it when its at your finger tips...unless you just hate having cash.

                    but back to the original point.... i agree that its good to have those ahead of you reach back to help you, which you did with the yale kid or whatever. i have been both the giver and recipient of this type of help, which you can check with my post history. ive given my help to other posters with their PS and WAMC as well as interview advice. ive received advice on my school list and saved plenty of time/money/headache but cutting out schools. having someone to help your file stick out is great. but don't pay for it. for example, people on here are worried about GPAs. look what a google search pulled up for me.... http://www.usnews.com/education/blo...hen-applying-to-medical-school-with-a-low-gpa. took me 30 seconds and i didnt have to pay a dime.

                    again.... ill stand by my opinion that you(not necessarily you OP) are a ***** if you pay for info that is readily available out there. if you dont like my opinion, you can ignore it or get over it. :cool: have a lovely day

                    ^

                    Why are you so upset?
                     
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                    pm121

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                      tenndoc is angry because i implied that he is arrogant and ignorant. i didn't mean to stoop and return your comments in kind, but your unabashedly orange, font 20 signature and your abrasive words are such classic features of the 'i hate top tier schools because i didn't get in' type that i just couldn't help myself. forgive me. :D
                       

                      drizzt3117

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                        I've run a little advising service for med school and residency apps. It's been pretty effective and most of the people I advised were pretty happy with it. I guess if I get bored of residency it'll be a viable option.
                         

                        tenndoc

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                        Aug 12, 2011
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                          tenndoc is angry because i implied that he is arrogant and ignorant. i didn't mean to stoop and return your comments in kind, but your unabashedly orange, font 20 signature and your abrasive words are such classic features of the 'i hate top tier schools because i didn't get in' type that i just couldn't help myself. forgive me. :D
                          you should check a poster's history next time champ. i really dont care that i didn't get into a top tier school. its not my style and i wouldnt fit in. at least you had the openness to address the issue with me and not send me a pm saying you'll kick my ass for saying that to you like someone else did last night. :laugh: i got a good laugh out of it.
                           

                          RogueUnicorn

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                            tenndoc is angry because i implied that he is arrogant and ignorant. i didn't mean to stoop and return your comments in kind, but your unabashedly orange, font 20 signature and your abrasive words are such classic features of the 'i hate top tier schools because i didn't get in' type that i just couldn't help myself. forgive me. :D
                            i approve of this
                             

                            tenndoc

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                              i approve of this
                              I-aint-Even-mad.gif
                               

                              pm121

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                                tenndoc, its ok to be upset (why else would you spend the time to reiterate over and over that you're not?). but it's more important to recognize when your defense mechanisms begin to cloud the advice you give on this forum.

                                drizzt: how much did they pay you? how much advising did you give?
                                 

                                drizzt3117

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                                  tenndoc, its ok to be upset (why else would you spend the time to reiterate over and over that you're not?). but it's more important to recognize when your defense mechanisms begin to cloud the advice you give on this forum.

                                  drizzt: how much did they pay you? how much advising did you give?

                                  I usually charged ~$500-1000 depending on how well I knew them. I edited their personal statements, AMCAS activities, and helped them make a school list, and used my contacts to help them. I charged extra for editing secondary essays
                                   
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