vorosvirag

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I'd start w/ the fundamentals. For me, that would be a general text on ortho. I prefer Bishara or McNamara's text over Proffit. Those two keep it simpler through easier language and better figures. Some authors make concepts clearer than others, so there's less struggle for budding residents to decifer meaning. Proffit's new edition is better than the last, but still is not my go-to book. I also like Graber.

Like you, I tried to read a little before residency. It was helpful. However, my reading during residency is so much more effective. I have actual cases to reflect on I pour through the pages. Good luck, Ramzi.
 

Bifid Uvula

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Things to throw out, give away, or completely forget about:
1) Syringes/Needles/Anesthetic
2) Scalpels
3) Anything dental-related that could be considered having to do "physical work." :laugh: :laugh:
4) 97% of what you learned in dental school.


Things to consider buying:
Dr Proffit's textbook, Alginate, Mixing Pads and Bowls, Impression Trays, and funky little pliers.
 
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ortho07

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Things to throw out, give away, or completely forget about:
1) Syringes/Needles/Anesthetic
2) Scalpels
3) Anything dental-related that could be considered having to do "physical work." :laugh: :laugh:
4) 97% of what you learned in dental school.


Things to consider buying:
Dr Proffit's textbook, Alginate, Mixing Pads and Bowls, Impression Trays, and funky little pliers.

I cant wait!
 

Jaybe

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Things to throw out, give away, or completely forget about:
1) Syringes/Needles/Anesthetic
2) Scalpels
3) Anything dental-related that could be considered having to do "physical work." :laugh: :laugh:
4) 97% of what you learned in dental school.


Things to consider buying:
Dr Proffit's textbook, Alginate, Mixing Pads and Bowls, Impression Trays, and funky little pliers.

Plus, a coffee pot for the mornings and some golf clubs for the afternoons, right? 'Cause the only thing orthos do is make coffee and play golf, right?

Oh, and a comfy chair for '"sittin' around". Orthos do plenty of sittin' around, don't they?
 

vorosvirag

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One can sit on his/her hindquarters as much as he/she wants during an ortho residency. Some programs are more strict and regimented than others. Yet, regardless of the nature of your program, so much learning still comes from self-motivation.

I am grateful for the elements found in ortho that keep much of the stress and tension relatively low. We still face our demands. They're just different.

Good luck. Bishara's book is a great choice.
 

Jediwendell

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If you don't do anything else, get the new Proffit and read it. It is a really good update of the previous one. If you can read most of it, particularly the treatment sections, you will be up to speed in the academic regard. Proffit is so thick with information that I read it prior to my residency and it helped a TON. Graber is so-so but may tell you about Speed, Damon, etc. Graber is very thick but not enough really useful clinical information. Another good book is the MBT book by McLaughlin. It basically explains appliances to you. I wouldn't really read the McNamara book. It is too biased and old. Okeson's text is also a good read. It sucks, but you will have to know about TMJ and TMD and it is heavy on boards.


Or you could get a few six packs and drink a little. No matter what the OMS guys say, you will be busy. Take out call and I'm probably as busy in ortho as I was in OMS.
 

boobah

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Seriously though, what is a typical day like for an ortho resident? What time do you start every morning? How much time do you spend in lecture/seminar? How many patients do you see? What time do you go home? How much time do you spend reading/studying every night? Any comments from current ortho residents would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

Ramzi

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If you don't do anything else, get the new Proffit and read it. It is a really good update of the previous one. If you can read most of it, particularly the treatment sections, you will be up to speed in the academic regard. Proffit is so thick with information that I read it prior to my residency and it helped a TON. Graber is so-so but may tell you about Speed, Damon, etc. Graber is very thick but not enough really useful clinical information. Another good book is the MBT book by McLaughlin. It basically explains appliances to you. I wouldn't really read the McNamara book. It is too biased and old. Okeson's text is also a good read. It sucks, but you will have to know about TMJ and TMD and it is heavy on boards.


Or you could get a few six packs and drink a little. No matter what the OMS guys say, you will be busy. Take out call and I'm probably as busy in ortho as I was in OMS.

That was very helpful! thx a lot :D
 

gryffindor

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I like the new Proffit. The color pictures are really nice. If I were a pre-ortho resident trying to plow through Proffit, I would read Chapter 1, and then skip ahead to Chapters 6, 7, and 8. Then I'd read the rest. The Graber book is good but the chapters are really really long to get through compared to Proffit, IMO.
 

Bifid Uvula

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Don't get me wrong... I love orthodontics as a specialty, especially the dento-facial orthopedics aspects of it. The only interest I personally hold in it though is on the surgical end...orthognathics.

Everytime I had to get up in the middle of the night, I always thought of my ortho buddies snug asleep in their beds.

Its no secret that the lifestyle of an orthodontist far exceeds that of just about any other dental specialty, with endo coming in a close second. The problem is, that us OMFS people are too stupid to realize that... Instead of playing out on the golf-course, taking vacations to exotic islands or simply sleeping through the night in our own bed we chose a harsher lifestyle (at least for the first 6-10 years after dental school) because that is where our hearts and passions are.
 

butch1

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^^^^^ Ill take the exotic islands (antigua), own bed (Ritz), and golf (Pinehurst) for three hundred million Alex !
 

ItsGavinC

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The problem is, that us OMFS people are too stupid to realize that... Instead of playing out on the golf-course, taking vacations to exotic islands or simply sleeping through the night in our own bed we chose a harsher lifestyle (at least for the first 6-10 years after dental school) because that is where our hearts and passions are.

Doesn't sound so stupid to me.
 

Jaybe

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Try a little old book called Fetus into Man, Physical Growth from Conception to Maturity, by Tanner.

Its got some pictures in there that would make the most deviant among us feel a bit "icky". You know.:barf:
 

LonestarYankee

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Doesn't sound so stupid to me.

it's called "quality of life." quality of life, people! i totally agree to pursue your passion. there is nothing worse than doing something for the next 30 years you absolutely despise. however, consider the bigger picture: the happiness of your family along the journey, the quality of your education and training, and where all of this time will put you at the end of the process. i think that too often we are too consumed with our own motivations and desires and don't realize the stress and heartache we place on others, let alone the heartache we place on our own cardiovascular system!
 

tinker bell

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None of the description above applies to the ortho residency at my belove ucsf. I saw residents using syringe, putting in mini implants, etc....And they work pretty hard and very busy. So, check where you go first before buying the golf club & the coffee maker. I certainly didn't see them doing any of those sitting around.
And the ortho clinic has coffee maker for their residents...
 

Jaybe

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None of the description above applies to the ortho residency at my belove ucsf. I saw residents using syringe, putting in mini implants, etc....And they work pretty hard and very busy. So, check where you go first before buying the golf club & the coffee maker. I certainly didn't see them doing any of those sitting around.
And the ortho clinic has coffee maker for their residents...

If they are using a syringe, they crazy as a 'Sac a Nuts'. Orthos don't use syringes, or even own them.

Baylor and others are having pharmacists compound a special topical anesthetic formulation that works well for placing miniscrews. I've been ridiculed for posting about this before, but its true.
 
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