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Prereqs for non pre-med background

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Engg to Doc, Jun 12, 2002.

  1. Engg to Doc

    Engg to Doc Member
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    I am a software engineer with a non pre-med backgound. I have an MSCS degree. I was told that the State of California requires certain prereqs to be filled for the purposes of licensure - One year each of Bio, inorg Chem, org Chem and Phy each with lab. Can these just be general /introductory Physics, Chemistry and Biology, or will they be looking for specific topics to be covered? I am thinking of enrolling in a community college, and most of their courses seem basic. I am planning to take them just to satisfy the prereqs, I will prepare for the MCAT using different study material. Does this seem alright?
     
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  3. paean

    paean Senior Member
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    General Pre-reqs (for most schools) are 1 year of Bio, Chem, Organic Chem and Physics, all with labs. The classes need to be aimed at science majors, i.e. General Chem for Chem majors, not General Chem to fulfill a science general education req. for humanities majors. Many schools prefer that you take your premed reqs at a four year school, although some will accept community college credit. Even if they accept it, you may be seen as less competetive because all schools take the difficulty of your undergraduate college work into account, along with GPA, to evaluate your academic potential.

    I don't know what an MCSC degree is. You will need a bachelors along with the pre-med reqs. If you don't have one, or your degree is from a non-english speaking country, you may be asked to complete one in the US. If that is the case, you should be able to transfer course credit from your previous degree, allowing you to graduate in well under four years.
     
  4. Student247

    Student247 Member
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    The Community Colleges are not all that bad when it comes to the sciences. In fact, I know of a few professors who teach at both the CC and university, and say that they teach the classes identically. So, how can the medical review boards judge a students records based on where they took the classes when they havn't a clue as to who taught the class, or the degree of difficulty the material might have been?

    Regards,
    Student247
     
  5. rxfudd

    rxfudd 1K Member
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Student247:
    <strong>The Community Colleges are not all that bad when it comes to the sciences. In fact, I know of a few professors who teach at both the CC and university, and say that they teach the classes identically. So, how can the medical review boards judge a students records based on where they took the classes when they havn't a clue as to who taught the class, or the degree of difficulty the material might have been?

    Regards,
    Student247</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">It's not that the teaching is necessarily bad, it's that the competition is usually much less intense. A class can be tremendously difficult even if the material is not very challenging. For the average premed student, this would not be the case at a CC because they would not be competing with others who would mug their own mother for an A. Hence, it is an "easier" course.
     
  6. I assume that MSCS is Masters of Science (Computer Science). I am getting my Bachelor's in IT right now, so while taking those courses, I am also taking the required Science classes.

    I have noticed that several people with computer backgrounds are interested in becoming a physician. Are you going to take the MCAT next Spring? Best of luck! :)
     
  7. Engg to Doc

    Engg to Doc Member
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    MSCS is Master of Science in Computer Science and Engg. I have a Bachelors in Engg from India and a Masters in Engg from Florida with a GPA of 3.8. So I am assuming that my grad school GPA is proof enough that I have what it takes to handle competitive course load, right? Yes, I am taking the MCAT in Apr 2003. In the mean time, I plan to take classes in a nearby comm college. Thanks for all the input folks!
     
  8. ellerose

    ellerose Member
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    Don't forget that many schools require courses beyond the basics. Depending on what schools you are looking to apply to, you many also need to take biochem, molecular bio, physiology, statistics, etc. If you haven't already looked into what schools you want to apply to, you may want to start so that you know up front what other classes you may want to take.
     

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