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Prison rehabilitation and psych

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BaylorGuy

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Does anyone really think that the penal system can rehabilitate inmates?? I remember reading some paper (or hearing about it) that there is some large number of criminals, who get jail time, who after they are released into society, who tend to later get sentenced to more jail time (from other crimes).

Part of the reason why this comes up is because my brother was recently released from a 3-year term in prison. Its good to see him back, but honestly, I really see him as no better than when he went in. He seems to be institutionalized, which is more than understandable considering those who get jail time are pretty much following a set routine day after day for 'X' number of years.

To keep this medically relevant, I think that inmate psych, and pretty much psychiatry in general, has fallen behind the learning curve. I respect those who do psych beacuse i know that i could never do that, but i feel that it is almost as a vague science...kind of how medical training was like 200-300 years ago. I know neuroscience is making huge strides, but will it ever catch up? Thoughts??
 

cfdavid

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Sorry to hear about your bro.

I agree that neuroscience and psychiatry seem to lack behind the other disciplines in terms of mechanisms, and overall specificity of knowledge.

Regarding rehabilitation, it's an interesting topic. One example is for child sex offenders that have very high rates of recitivism. Even one's that have gone through extensive therapy, versus just being locked up in solitary confinement. So, if rehabilitation is not possible for those people, I sometimes wonder if rehabilitation is truly realistic with respect to violent criminals.

I'm sure there are some stats on this stuff, actually. I just don't know em.
But, I feel strongly that crimes of passion, though serious, don't necessarily define the individual. So, perhaps it depends highly on the person's history, as well as the offense that would determine successful rehab etc.
 

prana_md

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I trust that you're not a troll.
I was a journalist and I did a lot of work about prisons and incarceration. People who get rehabbed ... ie have an active social worker or psychiatrist/therapist do really well, statistically. Behavioral and cognitive therapy (DBT or CBT) are the best modality.
If you're not happy with the current treatment, maybe a more aggressive (or progressive) therapy?
Support="1", or "2" after safety. I (nearly) absolutely believe in rehab :love:
 

BaylorGuy

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No troll here, I'm just kind of fed up with prison tactics (can i call it that??). I know that psych and the penal system has come a long way, but it seems that they are still stuck in a backward sort of mentality...my opinions. There is so much room for improvement, but it almost seems as if these fields are kind of taboo...like they need to be swept under the carpet. Because of this, no progress can openly be made...unlike other diseases/disorders which have garnered lots of publicity and funds and have made great strides. Perhaps the only way I'm feeling this way is because i have first-hand knowledge of these fields and personally feel that they are inadequate. Again, no troll, just wanting other's opinions.
 

ShyRem

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Wife of a cop here. The recidivism rate for convicted offenders is about 80%. He sees the same folks committing the same crimes day in and day out. It's sad... no it's pathetic. He knows them by first name and knows all about their families.

I used to work for a criminal defense attorney. Yes, some of those folks were truly innocent, but several of them admitted to committing crimes specifically to get back to prison - the food was good, the healthcare was free, there was cable TV, a gym, and education. And all of it was free. So they committed more crimes to get back to jail to have "the good life". (hey, not my words - theirs. I'd rather die than go to prison.)

I think based on these two experiences that the only way to deter crime is to really truly enforce a punishment. Jail shouldn't be comfy. They should not have more privileges than I do. I pay a LOT for cable TV. I pay for my magazine subscriptions. I pay for my healthcare. I pay a whole heck of a lot for a gym. Whatever happened to chain gangs cleaning the roadsides? Why do we pay an outside firm to mow the jail grass? whatever happend to punishment for a crime? Even worse, many convicted offenders freely admit they had gotten away with crimes many times in the past (especially DUI), and when they finally do get caught the penalty isn't really THAT high to make them stop.

So, based on my experience, can we reform prisoners? No. Not unless we reform the legal system first. If we keep making people think they can have three, four, five chances before they get punished (i.e. jail time), then that's not much of a deterrent, is it? And isn't that what jail is supposed to be? A deterrant to crime? It's not working. Not working at all.

Ok. I'm done. (ducking for cover)
 
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