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Pros/Cons of DO schools

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by msd848, Jan 5, 2009.

  1. msd848

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    I have heard quite of assumptions of the pros/cons of DO schools... I just wanted to know what you guys all thought
     
  2. theserbatron

    theserbatron put mo' chamomile on it
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    pros: you're a physician.

    cons: pre-meds on SDN think you're not.
     
  3. RySerr21

    RySerr21 i aint kinda hot Im sauna
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    If you are looking for pro/cons between chooosing MD and DO, just do a search and youll find many hits with useless debates. Really the ONLY con about going DO is if you are dead set on a super compettiive specialty, you will have trouble matching into an MD residency. Thats just the way it is. But keep in mind there are also DO residencies so if arent worried about the MD residency, then that fact wont matter.

    If you are looking for pros and cons for specific DO schools, this thread will be useful.
     
  4. NPEMTIV

    NPEMTIV Accidentally Accepted
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    Read the other 1,000s of threads on this issue.
     
  5. slim78

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    There are cons?
     
  6. In the prisons (prions) ?
     
  7. engineeredout

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    Pros: Women will hump your junk.

    Cons: Men might hump your junk.

    If gay or a woman, switch those two.

    If bisexual then for the love of christ get into a DO school STAT.
     
  8. Chocolate Bear

    Chocolate Bear Moderizzle Fo'Shizzle!
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    New FAQ in the sticky: Why should I go to a DO school?

    Answer: Link to your post


    **MD/DO debate settled**
     
    #8 Chocolate Bear, Jan 5, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2009
  9. Cp22kjer

    Cp22kjer Bottom of the Food Chain
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    To me it would be more important to weigh the pro/cons of being a physician not the letters that follow your name. In the real world md/do's are much much more alike than different. Actually many times the only difference that I notice is the two letters.
     
  10. JaggerPlate

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    pros: you're a doctor

    cons: some 18 year old, world of warcraft fan will tell you it's impossible to become a dermatologist over the interweb.
     
  11. FrkyBgStok

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    pros: you are the same as an MD.

    cons: when you assign numbers to the letters (a=1, b=2, etc.) than DO is 4+15 or 19 and MD is 13+4 or 17. As you can see 19>17. The problem is no one knows if its like basketball so you want high numbers, or golf so you want low numbers. But using the above statement of DO = MD that would infer that 17 = 19. So the con is that it proves all mathematics incorrect.
     
  12. TeamZissou

    TeamZissou jaferd
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    Hahaha depends on if your a basketball fan. Thats great:thumbup:

    In all seriousness here is some information in a different thread on some of the differences between MD's and DO's. Some of it is pretty details but give the sticky thread a read and then this might clarify some things.

    First off the biggest difference between DO and MD is that the DO's get trained in OMM. This leads to some differences in their boards. The USMLE puts more attention on biochemistry than the COMLEX does. Other than that there is little difference. Many DO schools and MD schools share the same rotation sites so (Mayo Clinic, Cook County etc.) DO's have the same structure as the majority of MD schools; science courses for the first two years and clinical rotations for the second two. DO's have their own residencies that they apply to IN ADDITION to being able to do MD residencies. Most MD residencies in Neurosurgery, Plastics, Orthopaedics, ENT, and Dermatology are filled by MD's however occasionally some will go to DO's. Whether it's because DO's aren't as qualified as the MD's that apply to the program or they prefer to up their chances to match in the DO residencies (which takes place earlier than the MD match and if they match they are automatically withdrawn from the MD match) will be debated till the end of time so don't bother.
     
  13. nascardoc

    nascardoc Daddy to 2 kiddos
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    Pros: Same education as MD plus OMM....that means you're a doctor that can do everything an MD can, there is no difference.

    Cons: Not as research oriented (pro for me b/c I don't care about doing research)

    In terms of your uber-competitive specialties, those are competitive no matter where you go, so unless you are at the top of your class and rock your boards, you aren't gonna match

    Best.....post......ever

    :highfive: :claps:
     
  14. swamprat

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    i hate these threads theres a new one everyday
     
  15. Chocolate Bear

    Chocolate Bear Moderizzle Fo'Shizzle!
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    Many applicants begin to research Osteopathic medicine after unsuccessfully applying to Allopathic schools. It's just that time of year. :)
     
    Femur likes this.
  16. COMedic2Doc

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    Pros: You're still a Doc, the field is not as discriminated against anymore (except for some that are pretty much ignorant on the topic), most DOs are more down to earth and friendly (but I think it's just the person many times), OMM (there's discussion on this as well with the current trends), seeing the patient as a whole person (discussions on this as well), accepts those that are non-traditional students more frequently it seems, get to take two licensing exams if you choose to do so, etc.
    Cons: Might occasionally run into the individual who's still ignorant on DOs vs MDs, might run into issues with matching for residencies for some specialties (can be overcome by applying vastly with my understanding), can't really think of many others
     
  17. hopefuldoc87

    hopefuldoc87 Killer tofu
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    Jagger, you seem to forget that his uncle IS a radiologist, and thus a leading expert on professional perception of all DO's in the medical field.
     
  18. hopefuldoc87

    hopefuldoc87 Killer tofu
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    I always wondered how different could they be? I always hear how people have to study for both, but if both are tests on the knowledge of medicine, shouldn't they be pretty similar? And shouldn't you only have to study for just one??

    Any DO students who are studying for both, please explain...
     
  19. aterry

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    Why don't you read the book The DOs by Norman Gevitz. Its a great history on osteopathic medicine and its relation with allopathic medicine. The difference mostly just boils down to politics.
     
  20. MossPoh

    MossPoh Textures intrigue me
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    As is my dad, so father trumps uncle. I still win.
     
  21. CrewBHB

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    Here is a real answer to the OP's question (some of these might have already been said, or all of them)

    1) Osteopathic Physicians learn OMM (Manipulative Medicine) as apart of their core curriculum (in addition to all the other classes that MDs and DOs share) while the vast majority of MD schools do not teach this period. This leads to the board exams being slightly different, because they have to test on this subject.

    2) Osteopathic schools do seem to be a little behind on the research curve, but of course that depends on the school. However, many of the schools are increasing this every year, and of course there a MD schools that are less research focused as well. So this isnt a big difference in my opinion.

    You can find some research at any school.

    3) This is what the OP is probably wondering: Is there a stigma against DOs?

    Well, depends on who you ask. As far as your educational value, your the same as a MD. Period. DOs dont learn less, they arent inferior, and they are fully licensed.

    However, you will find not only ignorant pre-meds, but ignorant doctors, nurses, etc. Most of these are in the older generation, but everyone knows how this can be passed down. I have met doctors that say things like: "Oh your applying to DO schools? Well, try to get into an MD if you can" or "You will get a better education at MD schools".

    Bottom line, it comes from ignorance. But if you cant handle it, then its a factor to consider. In my opinion, if you cant handle any ignorance or criticism, then dont go into the medical field.

    4) Most DO schools dont have a hospital on campus (but one is nearby). Not really a factor at all to me, but it may be worth noting.

    5) If people are actually still reading this, realize that many pre-meds search these threads and find 100 other threads where everyone says its already been answered, is sarcastic, and does not give a real answer. Therefore I would encourage to give an answer, rather than contribute to this. I may be guilty of this as well, but its worth noting.

    That is all.
     
  22. rkaz

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    I agree with you. People are wayyy too sarcastic on this site.... like they have nothing else to do but to kill time posting silly comments on this forum. While it may be amusing and humorous at times, it is a huge time waste for those of us who are busy, and have to go through multiple cynical posts just to get a real answer to a question. Some of us do come to this site to find real answers (and gladly share our knowledge with others as well), not simply out of boredom. I don't want to be hypocritical, as I'm sure I may have a cynical post or two from the past, but I try to stay fairly helpful.
     
  23. JaggerPlate

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    But has he shadowed over two physicians and spent over 6 hours volunteering in an ER?? :smuggrin:
     
  24. engineeredout

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    poppycock!
     
  25. dozitgetchahi

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    I had the same impression when I first started browsing SDN's boards, but the situation seems to have improved lately.

    As for the DO question: with the possible exception of OMM, I really feel that no appreciable difference exists between the MD/DO professions at this point in time. Sure, there is some buzz here and elsewhere about how osteopathic physicians emphasize the "whole person" and engage in "holistic" and/or preventative care more than MDs, but in practice there is really little difference in how an MD works/diagnoses/behaves/practices when compared with a DO. Even the use of OMM doesn't even really distinguish DOs from MDs anymore; many DOs don't utilize OMM whatsoever, and some MDs choose to learn OMM anyway.

    Bottom line: Want to become a doc? You have 2 routes: DO or MD. Get into any school that grants either of the above degrees and you will become a physician. Furthermore, you'll be able to specialize in whatever you want, since institutional biases against DOs by residency directors, etc. have been weakening steadily over the last few years.
     
  26. Bacchus

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    DO allows you to manipulate and palpitate the goods, aka your classmates. Only if the butcher shop let you massage the rump roast before buying it.
     
  27. JaggerPlate

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    People in the DO boards can be sarcastic (myself included) but it's usually a few quick comments in :rolleyes: threads and then are extremely helpful throughout the rest of the thread/other threads. I've always found the people in pre-DO extremely helpful, and I'd deal with some sarcasm opposed to the '3.9/38 - am I screwed ??' threads on the other side any day.
     
  28. Semicolon

    Semicolon OMS II
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    Is that really a pro? :D

    Oh, and don't forget that DOs are not globally recognized like MDs are, although this would probably not become a factor unless you actually want to practice outside of the US.
     
  29. katarina90

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    :laugh: Well, that settles it for me...

    But seriously, the only major con I can think of is that DO school often costs more (not in all cases. But here TouroNV is about 33 K/yr and UNR is 13 K/yr for instate). Pros for me would be that there seems to be more nontrads, I would love to learn OMM, and being able to go for either a DO or MD residency.
     
  30. RySerr21

    RySerr21 i aint kinda hot Im sauna
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    If you are comparing to public MD schools for IS applicants, then yes DO is going to be more expensive, but you can also say that for private MDs or OOS public MDs. If you compare private MD with private DO, they are very similar.
     
  31. Ibn Rushd

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    One of the cons in going down the osteopathic route is the lack of recognition/acceptance of the degree outside the states. My understanding is that a DO would have significant hurdles to jump if he/she wished to practice abroad.
     
  32. dozitgetchahi

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    Depends on the country. Britain, for instance, will readily grant full licensure to an American DO. So will many Canadian provinces.
     
  33. JaggerPlate

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    Actually not true/fading all the time.
     
  34. RySerr21

    RySerr21 i aint kinda hot Im sauna
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    False. If there was trouble going abroad, schools such as DMU wouldnt have global health programs. Thats just one example.
     
  35. cliquesh

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    I wouldn't say its false. DO's can practice in about 1/3 the amount of countries MD's can.
     
  36. cliquesh

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    Average allopathic debt is 111k and average osteopathic debt is 155k.
     
  37. spicedmanna

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    This is a confusing issue, though. If you mean practice abroad as in doing medical mission type work through an established organization such as Doctors without Borders, or the like, then you are going to be fine no matter which country you do the work in. You aren't going to be limited by degree for medical mission type work. However, if you want to live in another country and practice permanently there, then, yes, your ability to have your degree recognized can vary. It could be a significant consideration, depending on what country you are talking about. Nevertheless, the list of international practice rights for DO's, continues to grow.

    Keep in mind, though, that it takes a bit a work to actually get licensed and to establish a practice in another country, no matter whether you are an MD or a DO. It is a misconception to think that you can just walk in with your MD or DO degree and start practicing permanently in another country. There are usually specific guidelines that must be followed and probably licensing exams that need to be taken, and other hoops that need to be jumped through, etc.
     
  38. JaggerPlate

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    Exactly what I was shooting at. :thumbup:
     
  39. JaggerPlate

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    I'd guess this is because of far more public MD schools, ie cheaper tuition. However, I'm fairly sure that private DO schools (majority) and private MD schools are quite comparable. I suppose you can factor in travel, living away etc if you do away rotations, but once again ... I wouldn't use this to generalize.
     
  40. p30doc

    p30doc Ever true and unwavering
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    Pros: Unlimited supply of shrunken heads and newts.

    Cons: Your becoming a doctor which only a lunatic would consider doing.
     
  41. hopefuldoc87

    hopefuldoc87 Killer tofu
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    Is it me or do a large number of people that compare the differences between MD/DO always bring up the ability to practice internationally. I don't know about you, but all the pre-meds at my school (including myself) don't care about international licensure. Besides mission work (which DO's are granted to do), how many of those people that cite this difference actually intend on living outside the US? Yes, it is a difference (which as someone posted is diminishing day by day), but is it really that much of problem? Are MDs/DOs graduating and moving abroad? If so, why are so many IMGs/FMGs coming into the US to practice?

    To me is just seemed like another justification to not go the DO route.
     
  42. COMedic2Doc

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    Well put, and does this really count as a justification, since the US is still one of the most highly respected countries in terms of our medical practices? I don't know about many others, but I have a feeling that by the time I really, truly care about moving to say Britain or Ireland things will already be resolved in terms of the DO route. For that which interests me the most, WHO and the like (Doctors without Boarders), both both respect the DO as being an equivalent to an MD. Personally, I'm starting to wonder if they are just grasping for straws in this debate and not finding much to grasp for in terms of disqualifying the DO route.
     
  43. MossPoh

    MossPoh Textures intrigue me
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    The ONLY reason premeds don't like it is because it is different letters and people don't like "different". If it is different then it MUST be inferior. duh

    My biggest thing was that I really don't care about OMM. I am slightly intrigued in it but the level I hate people touching me is ridiculous.
     
  44. JaggerPlate

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    Of course .01% of people who say they actually want to live/practice outside the US will ... it's just young dreaming. Kinda like how every 18 year old is worried about how to become a dermatologist who also lectures at an Ivy league University during some days of the week and does Neurosurgery on the side. Just big thoughts that will fade when reality kicks in ...
     
  45. JaggerPlate

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    poke ...
     
  46. RySerr21

    RySerr21 i aint kinda hot Im sauna
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    man you are gonna have a blast your first two years!
     
  47. andexterouss

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    May be they saw Sanjay Gupta? I mean the guy does TV reporting and occasional neurosurgery on the side. :scared:
     
  48. slim78

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    I find it much less awkward to be touched than to do the touching.
     
  49. Phenol312

    Phenol312 That's no moon...
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    I would just like to say that this thread made my day. You guys are too much. :laugh: Thank you for bringing humor to an otherwise miserable day at the office.
     
  50. JaggerPlate

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    Hahahah ... touche. That was awesome.
     

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