Apr 25, 2010
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Hey,

I had a random question. When you are in a clinical psych program and learn the WAIS, Wisc, Rorsch, NEO, etc. what is your school's rules about what to do with the testing materials when you are done? Like the scoring sheets and profile sheets (the ones that come from the test publisher for recording answers and scoring).

At my school, they let us keep those forms. Someone told me that apa guidelines say to shred them.

Who is right?

(My school is apa, btw)
 

erg923

Regional Clinical Officer, Centene Corporation
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Apr 6, 2007
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Hey,

I had a random question. When you are in a clinical psych program and learn the WAIS, Wisc, Rorsch, NEO, etc. what is your school's rules about what to do with the testing materials when you are done? Like the scoring sheets and profile sheets (the ones that come from the test publisher for recording answers and scoring).

At my school, they let us keep those forms. Someone told me that apa guidelines say to shred them.

Who is right?

(My school is apa, btw)
You (as a graduate student) are bound by the APA ethical guidelines regarding maintaining test security and integrity. Its your assessment data, thus its your responsibility, not your programs. I would recommend shredding them if you chose to dispose of them.
 
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AcronymAllergy

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As erg mentioned, APA guidelines stipulate that you do all in your power to ensure the integrity of the testing materials. Thus, I don't believe you'd be specifically bound from keeping the protocols for your own records/future reference; however, if you disposed of them, shredding would be one proper option. Conversely, simply tossing them in a trash can or recycle bin at your school would be inappropriate.
 

Therapist4Chnge

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You can sell unused protocols to licensed psychologists, which is pretty common for people to do if they shift their focus. A quick verification with the state licensing board ensures that you aren't handing over the material to someone who should not have it.