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Psychology in the UK

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by PsyMoose, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. PsyMoose

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    Just out of curiosity and insatiable wonderlust:

    Anyone considered taking a Msc in Clinical Psych abroad? I am up against a couple of waitlists and should they hand me lemons, I am trying to consider the finest route to an excellent lemonade. I have done a little nosing about the internet, but I am just certain in this group of hopelessly overachieving someone probably is an expert on the subject.

    Ok, experts and clever psychology fans, fess up! :bow:
     
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  3. terrybug

    terrybug happy
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    I considered it. First you have to submit your undergrad transcripts to the clearinghouse, along with a check. They evaluate if your American education matches the UK equivalent. They decided mine did not. I think they wanted to see half or more of my classes were psych related.
    So, oh well. They sent me a note with a full refund.
     
  4. MeghanHF

    MeghanHF Member
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    You may try a search of old posts. I believe we did at one time have someone on the board who was knowledgeable about this.
     
  5. LaLuna123

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    In order to be a clinical psychologist in the UK, you would normally complete a 3 year doctoral degree, giving you the title DClinPsy. The programs are mainly focused on clinical work, although there is some research also. Normally students who enter the program have worked for at least a year as an Assistant Psychologist (although I'm sure there is lots of variety between the students), and people don't tend to be accepted without any work experience.

    The clinical programs are funded by the National Health Service (NHS), whereby there are no fees and all students receive a "salary". Because of this funding, and because the NHS expects you to work for them after graduating (and they invested all that money in you), UK programs tend to not take students who aren't intending on staying in the country after graduating. Although I have heard that there have been a few exceptions, students without a working permit (an EU passport or married to a British citizen etc) may find it very difficult/impossible to be accepted. Even with these documents, a foreign national would often be expected to have some experience working for the NHS in the UK (partly to demonstrate interest in living in the country).

    I don't know much about equivalence of undergraduate degrees, but when you get you BA in the UK in psychology, most students have focused entirely on psych courses, whereas in the US students tend have taken other courses also, often resulting in fewer credits in psychology.

    Also, I'm not sure whether you could be licensed here if you decide to return...but I'd be interested to know if anybody knows!

    There's an awesome clinical psych forum for UK students (much like this one), which has been around for ages. Maybe they can be more helpful: http://www.psyclick.org.uk/

    I hope that helps!
     
  6. LaLuna123

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    Oh and additionally, it seems to be no less competitive to get into a program than it is over here! I have few British friends who have done this, and most of them have at least two years of clinical work experience after college, or masters degrees+part time/voluntary experience.

    I don't mean to discourage anyone though, I'm sure it could be done somehow!
     
  7. PsyMoose

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    Thanks for the terrific information! I was aware of some of the points mentioned, but it looks as though I will have to delve a bit deeper. I was just curious, as I've seen a few of the Msc degrees in the U.K. offer one year full-time programmes and it might be an interesting cultural and educational experience to learn about clinical psychology from a broader international standpoint. It would be my intention to return to the U.S. to apply yet again for a doctoral program on completion of the masters. As most of the clinical doctoral program in the states will only accept a limited number of master's credits anyway, I thought it would behoove me to take a master's that is:
    1) only a year long,
    2) provides unique practicum
    3) includes a thesis/master's dissertation

    Thoughts, suggestions, advice?
     
  8. PsiKo

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    Meghan is ever so disingenuously referring to her compatriot and former SDN Moderator (now banned from these fora), psisci*, who earned one of his graduate degrees from the University of London.

    *Search Psisci: his posts are now archived under the generic name Guest
     
  9. Livethedream

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    psici was banned??? but he was the best in here!!!
     
  10. LaLuna123

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    I wasn't aware that you could do an MSc in clinical psych in the UK. I know most universities used to have masters level clinical degrees back when a doctorate wasn't needed to practice (I'm not sure when this changed..80s, early 90s maybe?), but now most have been discontinued. That's cool though if you can find one, especially if you get some clinical practice with it too! I only know people who are doing MSc degrees in psychological research or health psych, but I haven't looked much into the masters degrees. I'd be interested to know what you find out. I'm sure it would be a great experience!
     
  11. joetro

    joetro Senior Member
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    I'm currently on an MSc Neuroscience course in the UK. I don't think there's an MSc Clinical Psych offered here but there is certainly a D.Phil which is very clinically oriented and offered through NHS. I like the idea of a terminal one-year Masters degree and quite honestly wish more places in the US would offer such a thing. I'm happy to answer questions but I don't know exactly how helpful I'll be since our courses are not the same. We offer an MSc Research in Psychology which seems to be good.
     
  12. PsyMoose

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    I agree completely. The thought of undergoing a 2-3 year Master's in the U.S. and then turning about to retake a good deal of the same coursework again in a ph.d program seems counterintuitive. I was considering an Msc in research, but for CV purposes I need practicum badly as I am research heavy and practicum light. I looked into a Ph.D. in the UK, but they require GBR and a Master's for consideration. I'm afraid that no U.S. undergraduate program provides sufficient basis for GBR, I'm hoping that my coursework will at least make me eligible for GBR, which apparently is a requirement through the British Psychological Society for entrance to a Msc programme. Another interesting question might be, if I do succeed in entering a Msc program in the UK, do I stay in the UK after graduation and complete a doctoral through NHS or return to the states? Do you think that licensure in the US would be very difficult with a PhD from abroad? Most of the universities claim wide transferability of credentials...

    I will master (pun intended) this process yet!
     

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