Faebinder

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Had to ask this question....

How intimidating is the publication section to community hospitals that don't do much or any research... lets say if you have 10+ national publications, 5+ abstracts and 10+ presentations. I realize this is extremely atypical to the average applicant who usually has zero, and I understand that at best case scenario it can be just 'not important' for community programs....but I am told that someone with this sort of setup would be highly undesirable by community programs who dont want anything to do with research.

Any insights please?
 

dynx

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They will be terrified. You see, community programs are filled with people who were afraid to do research. They wormed though 8+ years at a university without setting foot in a lab and hid from those super smart people that could figure out a p value or stand next to a poster in a resort town. My guess is any community program director would immediatly urinate upon himself when he sees your list of research experience.
 

p53

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Faebinder said:
Had to ask this question....

How intimidating is the publication section to community hospitals that don't do much or any research... lets say if you have 10+ national publications, 5+ abstracts and 10+ presentations. I realize this is extremely atypical to the average applicant who usually has zero, and I understand that at best case scenario it can be just 'not important' for community programs....but I am told that someone with this sort of setup would be highly undesirable by community programs who dont want anything to do with research.

Any insights please?
Easy Solution.

Write two personal statements for your ERAS. One for the community programs (don't bring up research interest). Write another one for the academic programs (bring up research interest).

As for intimidating. Who cares? You have no control on the other end. It is going to be on your CV so why worry about what may or may not be offensive? What are you going to do? Leave it out?

Keep in mind You can only turn in ONE CV for ERAS but you can turn in more than one personal statements.
 
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Faebinder

Faebinder

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p53 said:
Easy Solution.

Write two personal statements for your ERAS. One for the community programs (don't bring up research interest). Write another one for the academic programs (bring up research interest).

As for intimidating. Who cares? You have no control on the other end. It is going to be on your CV so why worry about what may or may not be offensive? What are you going to do? Leave it out?

Keep in mind You can only turn in ONE CV for ERAS but you can turn in more than one personal statements.
Thanx, good advise.
 

MacGyver

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My uneducated guess is that if community hospitals may like you as a candidate but say to themselves "yeah this guy is great but he wont like it here because we arnet a big time academic center. Our shot at getting him is low so we should probably rank other peopel higher who would be happier in a community hospital environment"
 

kittycat_642

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I have a pretty heavy research background and applied to both community and academic places last year. I found that both places seemed to be happy about my background. I matched at a community program.
 

Gfunk6

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There are plenty of community programs that have very strong research. Although they cannot possibly match the "big-name" research institutions in terms of sheer research dollars, they often have some other beneifts. For instance, since their funding is often largely private you do not have to go through all the red tape of federal (NIH) funding.

In addition, the harsh reality is that many, many med school grads (including some MD/PhDs) completely lose interest in basic research after graduation. The reasons are personal and myriad but include lab burnout, significantly less compensation than private practice, the headache of getting grants/getting tenured, the lack of infrastructure at many departments to accomodate physician-scientists, etc.

I can tell you from personal experience that I had research experience similar to yours and was invited to interview at plenty of community programs.
 
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